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Clean and Wax a Table Saw

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Blog entry by Mike posted 11-16-2015 05:15 AM 1368 reads 1 time favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

In this video I’ll show you how to remove rust and debris from your table saw’s cast iron top. This technique can also be used on any other cast iron tool surface. I’ve used this method for quite a while and it works well even in humid environments.


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-- look Ma! I still got all eleven of my fingers! - http://www.lepelstatcrafts.etsy.com - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCppWfrYGXCr5lm9uW-Fpqqw



11 comments so far

View punk's profile

punk

181 posts in 1881 days


#1 posted 11-16-2015 01:32 PM

mike I no you said to use w d 40 that’s what I used. then I tried stuff, yes that what the name is it dose wonders, you can get it at Lowe’s have a good day thanks for the tip

-- Punk in PA

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 642 days


#2 posted 11-16-2015 01:41 PM

Thanks for the video.

Is there a particular reason you use steal wool instead of a cloth or paper towel?

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4456 posts in 3426 days


#3 posted 11-16-2015 04:01 PM

Auto wax? Silicone is gonna make for some finishing prob?
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Mike's profile

Mike

406 posts in 2152 days


#4 posted 11-16-2015 05:32 PM

@ Punk – Yes it does do great stuff. Thank’s for watching the video.

@ WoodNSawdust – I find that when I use the steel wool it allows the wax to lay down more evenly. I’m speculating that it is because it has voids were excess wax can move into unlike a paper towel. I don’t see a reason why you couldn’t use paper towel to apply the wax. All I know is that the steel wool works and works well so I use it. Thanks for watching and commenting.

@ Bill White – I haven’t had finishing problems due to the auto wax I use as long as I wait for the wax to setup (harden) and I buff off the excess. The only time I can recall having a problem was if I rushed and didn’t let the wax setup. I shot the video on a cold day in the shop and I think I waited no more than 20 minutes from the time I finished applying the wax till the time I started to buff the wax off. Great question. Thanks for watching and commenting.

-- look Ma! I still got all eleven of my fingers! - http://www.lepelstatcrafts.etsy.com - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCppWfrYGXCr5lm9uW-Fpqqw

View RonGoldberg's profile

RonGoldberg

44 posts in 1823 days


#5 posted 11-17-2015 02:46 AM

Thanks for the video. What grit sandpaper did you use. It appeared to be that wet/dry type and the grit looked like 2000. Was that correct. Do you think using 600 grit would be too course?
Thanks,
Ron
McLean, VA

View Mike's profile

Mike

406 posts in 2152 days


#6 posted 11-17-2015 08:57 AM

Ron,

Yes I was using 2000 grit wet / dry sand paper. I wouldn’t really recommend 600 grit because it may be to course for the cast iron. The goal is really to just remove the surface rust and dirt and not to re-grind the surface. If the top is really rusted out or really dirty, you may need to use a different, more aggressive method.

Remember they are your tools :)

Thanks for watching and asking a good question.

-- look Ma! I still got all eleven of my fingers! - http://www.lepelstatcrafts.etsy.com - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCppWfrYGXCr5lm9uW-Fpqqw

View RonGoldberg's profile

RonGoldberg

44 posts in 1823 days


#7 posted 11-17-2015 11:54 PM

Thanks for your quick response. What is your opinion (as far as first step) – I don’t have any 2000 grit wet/dry sand paper. I could always purchase if I had too. What about using 000 or 0000 in the first step (with the. Wd40).

View Mike's profile

Mike

406 posts in 2152 days


#8 posted 11-18-2015 10:06 AM

Ron,

It really depends on how dirty or rusty the table saw is. I had a bit of sap and dirt as well as a little bit of rust on mine. I used the 2000 grit sandpaper to remove that and to bring it back to a “flat” and smooth surface. If you don’t have those issues you certainly can jump to the waxing phase. I don’t think there is a significant difference in the 000 versus the 0000 steel wool in this application. You can always give it a try and if it works, great! If not, you can try again with the 2000 grit sandpaper and WD-40. Experimentation is good! Take some before and after photos if you have time. I’d love to see the improvement!

Mike

-- look Ma! I still got all eleven of my fingers! - http://www.lepelstatcrafts.etsy.com - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCppWfrYGXCr5lm9uW-Fpqqw

View Don Broussard's profile

Don Broussard

3022 posts in 1717 days


#9 posted 11-19-2015 03:20 AM

Nice video, Mike. Did you do anything special to the miter slots?

-- People say I hammer like lightning. It's not that I'm fast -- it's that I never hit the same place twice!

View Mike's profile

Mike

406 posts in 2152 days


#10 posted 11-19-2015 05:17 AM

Don,

No I didn’t. I just really cleaned them out.

Thanks for watching!

-- look Ma! I still got all eleven of my fingers! - http://www.lepelstatcrafts.etsy.com - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCppWfrYGXCr5lm9uW-Fpqqw

View Josh's profile

Josh

1201 posts in 2035 days


#11 posted 12-20-2015 05:52 PM

Mike, nice video. I wouldn’t have thought that auto wax would do the trick, but it’s good to know. I think you should’ve used a miter gauge at the end while demonstrating on your saw, though. I realize that we don’t always do the right thing when working in our shops, but it would be safer to demonstrate by-the-book safety procedures when publishing online. Great video, though. I also wouldn’t have thought to use the WD-40. Hey, the more you know….

-- Tree, wood, and box lover from Pennsylvania

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