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Craftsman Table Saw 28462 #1: Craftsman Table Saw Miter

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Blog entry by LegendInMyOwnMind posted 05-15-2011 08:21 PM 6255 reads 1 time favorited 19 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Craftsman Table Saw 28462 series Part 2: Throat Plate pains »

Like many people my first big shop tool was a table saw. Not knowing any better I bought a Sears Craftsman saw, model 28462. I’m sure there are good Craftsman saws, but the low end saws have a non-standard miter gauge slot. What does that mean? It means you can’t buy any standard tools such as featherboards, tenon jigs, etc. I really need a cross-cut sled and I am left to come up with a custom track to fit. Adding insult to injury this table saw has notches which mean that a square block can’t be used.

The saw came with a miter gauge which is T-shaped. Here’s what I measured with my calipers.

Lots of articles say to cut a piece of hardwood to use as tracks. Sounds good in theory but the T shape makes this really difficult.

I am hoping I can get a piece of 5/8” stock that is 5/32” or less thick.Then I think I will use a standoff to space up from the bar to the table top edge. If I can do that, then I will have a workable miter slat to use for jigs (like the crosscut sled).

-- Doug - When all you own is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.



19 comments so far

View juniorjock's profile

juniorjock

1930 posts in 2511 days


#1 posted 05-15-2011 09:24 PM

Welcome to LJ, Doug. I had the exact same problems with my first table saw (Hitachi). I didn’t notice it until I bought a tenoning jig. There was no way that jig was going to work with the saw I had. I started to send the jig back but I decided that I would eventually buy another saw that had standard slots. I’m glad I kept it. When I bought it, I paid about $50 for it. Now, they go as high as $100.
Trying to build a cross-cut sled almost drove me crazy. Good luck. Maybe you’ll be able to upgrade soon.
- JJ

View intheshop's profile

intheshop

48 posts in 1584 days


#2 posted 05-15-2011 10:00 PM

Doug,

Don’t worry about the T-slots. Just use a rectangular strip for your runners. If you have a thickness planer they can be quite easy to make. If not, you can use a hand plane (assuming you have one) and it’s not too much more difficult. Also, you can deliberately make the runners a little narrow, then as you screw them to the sled, shim them with business or playing cards so that they run against the inside (or outside) of the slots – as long as both of them reference the inside (or outside) of the slot they will take any play out of the sled.

Finally, make them a little shallow and place dimes in the bottom of the slot and place the runners on top of the dimes. That raises the tops of the dimes above the table, and the sled sits on top of the runners as you screw them in. When you remove the dimes the sled sits on top of the table. Then wax the sled, runners, table and slots, and it will slide like a dream. You could also use pennies if you’r a real cheapskate. ;-)

-- Cole - Rydal, GA

View RKW's profile

RKW

326 posts in 2193 days


#3 posted 05-16-2011 02:56 AM

i had this problem with my first table saw. If i remember right i cut a rabbit on both sides of my runners which created a t-shape that worked. I no longer have the saw or the sled so i cant get any more specific, but i know i did it once and it worked great.

-- RKWoods

View dpwalker's profile

dpwalker

265 posts in 1577 days


#4 posted 05-16-2011 07:59 PM

Hey Doug, I had the same problem with my cheap Craftsman. If you check Sears Parts direct http://www.searspartsdirect.com/partsdirect/index.action?intcmp=xsite_Sears you should be able to find metal miter rods to fit your saw (about $5 each). I bought 4 & use them for sleds. I also used a grinder attachment on my hand drill to shave the notches flush with the slot. It works well.

-- You have not really lived until you do something for someone who can never repay you.

View LegendInMyOwnMind's profile

LegendInMyOwnMind

198 posts in 1332 days


#5 posted 05-17-2011 10:20 AM

@dpwalker – I’ve been part of the way down that road. Problem is I want the slides to be longer than the one mounted to the miter. Ideally, I’d like them to be 1.5x times the table depth to make a solid sled runner.

I’m trying a crazy idea and will post if it works or not. Ordered two pairs of 4 ft long bar stock pieces. One that fits into the lower part and one that will mount above. If I can drill/attach them together I should have a track that will be long and fit well.

i like the idea of using the sears part for particular jigs like a custom tenon jig.

I think all of this is an attempt to make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear.

-- Doug - When all you own is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1386 days


#6 posted 05-17-2011 10:45 AM

Yeah, but if you make that silk purse out of a sow’s ear, will the Saw Stop cut it anymore ? lol

Why in the world would you want the your runners on your sled to be a t ? Like Cole suggested, just make them fit the full depth and the narrowest width. Are you wanting to have to slide your sled in from the ends every time you use it ? I have standard slots on my ridgid, but I assure you my sleds do not and will not be t’s. Does anybody do that?

Now if I misunderstood and you are trying to make runners for hold-downs, feather boards, etc. then it makes sense.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View LegendInMyOwnMind's profile

LegendInMyOwnMind

198 posts in 1332 days


#7 posted 05-17-2011 11:19 AM

@David – Thoughts greatly appreciated. A few of my reasons and these might be answerable but here goes anyway.

The narrowest width is .454 inches – a non-standard width. 3/8” wide bar stock would be .375 resulting in way too much slop. It’s true that I could sandwich between both tracks and snug it inside or outside, but I don’t want to have to span the blade since it complicates any jigs I want to build.

The bigger reason is that the top of the T is tabs not a slot and doesn’t run the entire length. In fact, there are only two tabs (see picture). So unless I want to put a very long front end on the runners it just won’t work.

The bottom of the track is a very convenient 5/8”. I can buy bar that fits that track and has very little slop.

-- Doug - When all you own is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

View LegendInMyOwnMind's profile

LegendInMyOwnMind

198 posts in 1332 days


#8 posted 05-17-2011 03:21 PM

Here’s what I am going to do at this point in time.

-- Doug - When all you own is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1386 days


#9 posted 05-18-2011 05:52 AM

Dear Legend,

Wow. I have learned something here (again). What was/is the purpose for those tabs? I’ve never seen those before. I just retired a 17 year old Craftsman saw that did not have those tabs.. although it did have the non-standard miter slot and a very disgusting miter gauge.

Good luck. You are a more persistent and patient man than I.

DG

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12302 posts in 2843 days


#10 posted 05-18-2011 05:55 AM

I had a similar saw. I tried to taper some 2” oak on it. Scared me to death or at least enough to go buy a unisaw. New saw would be my recommendation.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View LegendInMyOwnMind's profile

LegendInMyOwnMind

198 posts in 1332 days


#11 posted 05-18-2011 11:40 AM

David G – No, I think I’m just the most cheap, although I am learning that cheap isn’t better in the long run and I am sure I will eventually bow down and get a new saw.

@Wayne – that seems to be the common thread in most of the solutions, but I got some crazy in me that wants to come up with a “better” solution and I do tend to over Engineer everything I do.,

I have a buddy who offered me $50 for the saw. Don’t know if he wants the saw or just wants to shut up my complaining about it. If he was less of a friends, I’d go for the deal in a second.

-- Doug - When all you own is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

View LegendInMyOwnMind's profile

LegendInMyOwnMind

198 posts in 1332 days


#12 posted 05-18-2011 11:44 AM

@David G – The tabs appear to be there to hold in the miter slot. My theory is that they hired a group of high school dropouts who have never used a table saw before and gave them the opportunity to be a tool designer.

I can’t imagine that tool is cheaper to manufacture with the tabs than it would be without them.

Best idea here is to take a grinder to the tabs. Then I could just use 5/8×1/2 bar stock and be done with it.

-- Doug - When all you own is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

View bubinga's profile

bubinga

861 posts in 1413 days


#13 posted 05-19-2011 10:25 AM

I know what i would do, for sure ! I would get out the die grinder ,and very carefully remove those tabs, finish up with files and fine sand paper.
I use steel bar stock for my sled ,and jigs, in my standard miter slots

-- E J ------- Always Keep a Firm Grip on Your Tool

View LegendInMyOwnMind's profile

LegendInMyOwnMind

198 posts in 1332 days


#14 posted 05-19-2011 01:14 PM

I think the table top is plastic, not metal.

-- Doug - When all you own is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

View derosa's profile

derosa

1557 posts in 1582 days


#15 posted 05-19-2011 04:10 PM

I will second those who say to get a new one. I had that saw and filed the tabs off with a metal file, about a hour’s worth of work overall. I’d used the saw for minor cuts around the house like plywood and such and it served well until I decided to make my kid’s crib. I spent about 4 hours making everything perfectly square and milled down some ash to make runners, built a perfectly square crosscut sled and had the motor sieze on the firs piece of 2” thick purpleheart I tried to run through it on the sled. Spent 400 on a closeout hitachi and have been way happier.

-- --Rev. Russ in NY-- A posse ad esse

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