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Conference table / work bench #2: Construction Details

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Blog entry by Lee A. Jesberger posted 2545 days ago 2052 reads 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Wenge and White Ash Table Part 2 of Conference table / work bench series no next part

I thought I would include a few more photos, showing the construction details.

I’m not sure why I always end up with the photos in reverse order, but maybe you should start from the bottom!

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Completed top, waiting for the edge shaping and butterflies.

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My stepson, Evan, inspecting our work.

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Lee and Evan installing 1/8" thick, Wenge edge banding.

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The underside, fitted and stained. The holes allow attaching the top to the frame.

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Evan measuring for the stainless inserts.

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Lee, still installing the saus hinges.

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Lee, installing the saus hinges.

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Both slabs veneered.

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Bruce "laying up" the ash veneer.

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One side out of the vacuum bag.

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One side in the vacuum bag.

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Bruce working on the frame.

Note the full sized drawing on the M.D.F. sheet, complete with the joinery drawn in. This allows us to make the parts, and test them against the drawing.

Once this was done, we added the felt, sanded and finished the table with conversion varnish.

Hope you enjoyed this.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com



14 comments so far

View Damian Penney's profile

Damian Penney

1140 posts in 2618 days


#1 posted 2544 days ago

Lee can you explain the construction of the core a bit more. I think I get how it’s put together but I don’t quite see it when I look in the pics. There is a honeycomb core, with some thin mdf on top, is that mdf rabbetted into the frame, if not how is the core attached to the frame.

(Also they are Soss hinges :)

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 2615 days


#2 posted 2544 days ago

Nice looking table. I like the versatility.

Looks heavy?

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2664 days


#3 posted 2544 days ago

Thanks, Lee. Your skill at doing this type of work is really great to have documented.

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View Karson's profile

Karson

34870 posts in 3028 days


#4 posted 2544 days ago

Great design and construction details. Yes why do you put it backward.

Wait I know; you are not in construction you are in demolition. You take things apart.

This whole thing has been a sham. LOL

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2788 days


#5 posted 2544 days ago

he always said that he just makes this up :)

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6646 posts in 2607 days


#6 posted 2544 days ago

Hi Damian;

I knew that spelling was incorrect, but let go. Thanks for the info. Now I have to go build something and use some soss hinges, so I can write an article!

Anyway, you have it right. We route rabits on the frame work, and install 1/4” m.d.f. flush with the rails. I believe the dining room table project has the details shown.

Any cross pieces used are the thickness of the solid stock, minus 1/2”. The thickness of the cardboard we generally use is 3/4”, or 1”.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6646 posts in 2607 days


#7 posted 2544 days ago

Hi Mot and Gary,

Thanks for the kind words..

The table top is really not that heavy. The gent was 65, I think, and was in failing health, but he had no trouble flipping the top over..

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6646 posts in 2607 days


#8 posted 2544 days ago

Karson,

I was going to make a wise crack about the demolition business but I resisted. But I am glad you didn’t.

Ask Ms Deb, she knows!

I’m going to resist dismanteling any more furniture until after the picnic.LOL

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4435 posts in 2589 days


#9 posted 2544 days ago

Hey Lee,
I still like the table. It is great that you are willing to detail”How it was done” for all the rest of us. It sure helps if something comes up of a siomilar fashion. Great blog.
Tom

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6646 posts in 2607 days


#10 posted 2544 days ago

Hi Tom , my pleasure.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

3962 posts in 2691 days


#11 posted 2543 days ago

Once again, another home run! Thanks for the detailed blogging, Lee.
Will you be covering any finishing details? With the ash and wenge both being open-grained I am wondering what finish was used and whether you used a grain filler.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

View jockmike2's profile

jockmike2

10635 posts in 2874 days


#12 posted 2543 days ago

Beautiful table Lee, complicated but very nice looking. Mike

-- (You just have to please the man in the Mirror) Mike from Michigan -

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6646 posts in 2607 days


#13 posted 2543 days ago

Hi Doug,;

I checked with Bruce, he’s the finisher.

It’s conversion varnish, with no filler. Referred to as an open pore finish.

With the application of several coats, and sanding between, it becomes fairly smooth., yet still leaves the wood texture.

Bruce is not a big fan of grain fillers. (I think it’s because it’s an extra step, but don’t tell him I said that)

Thanks,

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6646 posts in 2607 days


#14 posted 2543 days ago

Hi Mike,

It just looks complicated. Really pretty straight forward. (except for the curves).

Thanks,

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

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