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Heritage Bookcase from Estate Wood #4: The Final Photo Session

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Blog entry by Lee Barker posted 02-11-2011 09:23 PM 1172 reads 1 time favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Dealing with Twist and Stealing the Undesirably-Angled Feature Part 4 of Heritage Bookcase from Estate Wood series no next part

Finish was two coats of my own OV Secret Formula (one part Watco Natural, one part Satin polyurethane) followed by Watco Satin Wax applied ambitiously with 000 steel wool.

I am pleased with the overall project but it seems slightly out of proportion to my eye. I think if it were an inch or inch and a half shallower I’d be doing handsprings throughout the asphalt. As it is, I am smiling beatifically and ready to see it escorted to its new home.

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"



14 comments so far

View superstretch's profile

superstretch

1530 posts in 2160 days


#1 posted 02-11-2011 10:08 PM

Wow looks sharp. Do you find that mixing the Watco + poly gives the surface the same amount of protection as Watco then poly?

-- Dan, Rochester, NY

View Luke's profile

Luke

289 posts in 2153 days


#2 posted 02-11-2011 11:27 PM

love the live edge

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4607 posts in 2503 days


#3 posted 02-12-2011 12:19 AM

Get some books on it and the proportions will look fine, Lee. An elegant piece of work.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2317 days


#4 posted 02-12-2011 12:21 AM

Dan, I think poly over Watco would be better protection if the number of coats is the same in the comparison. In the final analysis, both products are basically a varnish. What the blend gives me is more build than just Watco and the wiping ability that pretty much precludes drips and runs. On a piece like this, where there are always vertical surfaces no matter how you flop it, I prefer a wipe on finish.

If there were high friction areas, I’d give them extra coats horizontally. A bookcase is essentially inert, very little activity, so I’m quite comfortable with the two coats plus the wax. Felt nice, too.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View steliart's profile

steliart

1817 posts in 2155 days


#5 posted 02-12-2011 01:39 AM

I like it, I wonder how it would look with all shelves been live edge

-- Stelios L.A. Stavrinides: - I am not so rich to buy cheap tools, but... necessity is the mother of inventions - http://www.steliart.com --

View Vasko's profile

Vasko

271 posts in 2153 days


#6 posted 02-12-2011 01:46 AM

I do love live edges, and that streak of sapwood in the shelf below it is sharp! That the dowels match the light wood is eye-catching, too. I love this piece.

-- - Cindy, texture freak -

View Vasko's profile

Vasko

271 posts in 2153 days


#7 posted 02-12-2011 02:04 AM

Excuse the beginner’s questions, but I just went back to read your blog series on this. You talk about cutting kerfs to aleviate twist in some of the boards. Am I right in thinking a kerf is the same as a simple straight cut made on a table saw? Does a kerf reduce stress by adding more surface area, or because it cuts through the grain (breaking tension?). Sorry for the dumb questions, but this is a good chance for me to learn something ; )

-- - Cindy, texture freak -

View Chris Matthews's profile

Chris Matthews

21 posts in 2247 days


#8 posted 02-12-2011 04:11 AM

I find the cherry kicker and the cherry top piece causes my focus to constantly shift back and forth – I can’t seem to land on something. I think it would have been better to make the kicker out of walnut and then the top piece would have been a focal point – especially once full of books. But what do I know.

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 3139 days


#9 posted 02-12-2011 04:14 AM

Nice bookcase.

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2317 days


#10 posted 02-12-2011 04:32 AM

Well that’s a valid point, Chris, well taken. And I’ve seen your stuff, and I trust your eye.

Cindy, the kerfs with the grain essentially make the wood thinner, so it’s easier to bend flat. On the ash shelf, I had much more movement to achieve, so I cut the kerfs cross grain to sever a bunch of the fibers. In both cases I was making cuts that did not go all the way through the board.

“kerf” refers to the slot the saw blade makes, or it may refer to the amount of material that goes away in the cutting. ex, “Once I cut the 36” board in two, I lost an eight of an inch to the kerf.”

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View superstretch's profile

superstretch

1530 posts in 2160 days


#11 posted 02-12-2011 05:06 AM

Lee Thanks for the response to my question. With a zillion different ways to finish a piece, its nice to know the rationale for ways things were done.. one of those “catch a man a fish and he eats for a day” sort of things.

Thanks

-- Dan, Rochester, NY

View spunwood's profile

spunwood

1198 posts in 2303 days


#12 posted 02-12-2011 04:27 PM

Long live the live edge!

-- I came, I was conquered, I was born again. ἵνα ὦσιν ἓν

View Vasko's profile

Vasko

271 posts in 2153 days


#13 posted 02-14-2011 09:28 AM

Thanks Lee, that was very informative!

-- - Cindy, texture freak -

View Terry Ferguson's profile

Terry Ferguson

203 posts in 2134 days


#14 posted 02-26-2011 05:51 AM

Very nice. Like the live edge. If it seems out of proportion to you, could it be the shaped front edge of the sides that causes us to question it a little compared to what we’re used to seeing a bookshelf. It seems to visually undulate in and out and maybe appear to swell out a little in middle.
Those are small things compared to how good it looks and I like a bookshelf that looks very substantial.
Also like the rich natural color.

-- Terry Ferguson, Bend Oregon

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