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Mixer stand build #2: Legs and "joinery"

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Blog entry by Lalen posted 12-06-2016 02:55 PM 834 reads 1 time favorited 3 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Getting Started: Legs and top Part 2 of Mixer stand build series Part 3: Updated drawing, lower shelf and dowel holes »

Tapering of the legs went pretty well. The tapering jig in the last post failed a little because all I had done is shoot brad nails in the cross braces. ( Duh!) had to reset the angle and re-cut a few sides but not too bad. (lesson #1: secure the jig!) Since this was a 4 side taper, I cut 2 sides, then used the off-cut as a wedge to fill the gap when I cut the other 2 sides. I cut the notch (dado?) for the shelf in my table saw sled before I did the taper so it would be perpendicular to the floor and leg would be stable for the cut.

I cut the mortises on the router table. 1/2” bit, about 1.25” deep, 2.5” long using several passes. (lesson #2: do this before you taper the legs! Duh x2) I had about 5 inches on the end that was square and had to really be careful to hold that flat to the table. Picture is just a test cut.

I made up a tenon jig for my table saw fence to cut the tenons.

I found it easier to carve the tenons round to fit the mortise compared to chiseling out the mortise.

Glued it then stood it quickly on the only known flat/square surface I had. Squared up the legs then put a gravity clamp on the top to hold it. (man that scroll saw is heavy!)

Out of the ‘clamps this morning.

Definitely some needed improvement in my M&T joinery. For those that were loose I glued in shims to tighten them up (during assembly so the gaps at the top are not all the way down. I am going to run some dowels through the legs into the tenons for extra strength just to be sure.

So here is where it stands now.

Next steps
1. Dowels through legs/tenons
2. Make the lower shelf
3. Make the towel bar.. (?) still figuring this one out
4. Sanding, Sanding, Sanding

Observations, critiques, suggestions all welcome! Thanks!

-- Lalen, Texas. "If it looks straight, it is straight" Jimmy Diresta



3 comments so far

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1489 posts in 3310 days


#1 posted 12-06-2016 03:07 PM

Very nice! I love seeing it go from SketchUp to wood.

You could slice up your top on the table saw, rotate all the pieces, glue them back together and have an end grain butcher block top.

Dowels for pinning the mortises could be of a contrasting species.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View Lalen's profile

Lalen

120 posts in 362 days


#2 posted 12-06-2016 03:21 PM

Thanks Captain!

Thinking through slicing up the top to make it end grain. I’ve already cut it to size and the frame is set so I might loose too much dimension by doing that now from blade kerf and re-surfacing the top. Definitely something to consider because it would make it a lot tougher.

Great note on contrasting wood for dowels! I will definitely take that one and incorporate when I pin the lower shelf also.


Very nice! I love seeing it go from SketchUp to wood.

You could slice up your top on the table saw, rotate all the pieces, glue them back together and have an end grain butcher block top.

Dowels for pinning the mortises could be of a contrasting species.

- CaptainSkully


-- Lalen, Texas. "If it looks straight, it is straight" Jimmy Diresta

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1489 posts in 3310 days


#3 posted 12-07-2016 03:11 PM

Since it’s purpose-built as a mixer stand, your top is perfect. The design just made me think of butcher block tops.

Check out how to “ebonize” wood with steel wool and vinegar.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

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