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Perfect 90° on the router table

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Blog entry by KnickKnack posted 463 days ago 960 reads 1 time favorited 3 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I do almost everything on a router table – it’s the only precision tool I have.
A huge amount of woodworking seems, to me, to involve making one edge of a piece of wood at a 90° angle to another edge, so I made (a couple of years ago, in fact), this jig to make me perfect 90s.
The schematic goes …

Basically a baseplate – I use mdf floorboards – thin, fairly strong, parallel edges and, unlike everyone who “scored a bit of walnut burl in the borg yesterday”, is one of the few useful things that ever appears in the bins at my local DIY – great for jigs.
On the baseplate I’ve glued a another piece of MDF at exactly 90°. It took me 2 attempts, but, unless you’re really really close to 90, it’s going to do you no good. (Although, as an aside, I have several very similar jigs at non-90° angles to make the “slight angles” I’m so fond of)
The key is the rectangular slab that’s taken out of the baseplate – this allows you to have your wood protruding into space, yet still be able to run the straight edge of the baseplate against the straight edge of your router fence.
You need a hold down mechanism – I tried those clamps you can attach to jigs, but they were a hassle and they were always wanting to bend my mdf, so, instead, i have any old piece of wood, with 2 bolts coming up and butterfly nuts to hold down. You can have as many holes as you like, depending on the width of your piece, but at any one time you’re only using 2 of them. It’s particularly good for small pieces – once they’re clamped down you are still guiding a big chunky thing rather than a small thing.

This is mine in use edging (on the end grain) a panel of bookmatched jatoba…

and, bingo…

Never know – this might be useful to someone.

-- "Do not speak – unless it improves on silence." --- "Following the rules and protecting the regulations is binding oneself without rope."



3 comments so far

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AaronK

1389 posts in 2062 days


#1 posted 463 days ago

hmm, basically a power version of a shooting board – one that could take a lot more abuse than a hand powered version, since cutting end grain is tough on blades and ideally requires a steep edge with dedicated plane. i wonder – why did you choose to use a baseplate instead of a miter gauge running in a slot?

View KnickKnack's profile

KnickKnack

965 posts in 2164 days


#2 posted 463 days ago

i wonder – why did you choose to use a baseplate instead of a miter gauge running in a slot?

…”miter gauge running in a slot”
I presume by this you’re meaning something along the lines of…

This seems great for a piece of wood held basically vertically, but I don’t see how you hold a flat piece of wood 9” wide to it? And maybe you could, but then you need to run it again 1mm closer to the blade – so what do you move to make that happen?
I may have misunderstood – in which case apologies.

I like that I’m pushing a big solid thing against the fence.

-- "Do not speak – unless it improves on silence." --- "Following the rules and protecting the regulations is binding oneself without rope."

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1389 posts in 2062 days


#3 posted 462 days ago

good point. i have seen lots of jigs for router tables (box joint, etc) that use a base plate in a miter slot… any ideas about this vs. riding against a fence?

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