LumberJocks

Wood Gloat

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Kerux posted 06-06-2008 11:27 PM 1009 reads 2 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Picked up Josh from the last day of school and then dropped by the grounds crew to see if they had cut any tree’s down lately. They did, One HUGE Maple. I can have as much as I want, but I’ve learned to only take a little bit at a time. When I get this stuff turned/roughed out, I’ll go get some more.

The crew is really nice, they are so loaded down with fallen tree’s that they are glad to get rid of it. I’ve got my eye on a giant piece that looks very quilted. So when I get this done, I’ll be back out there.

Here is some really nice spalted pieces I received.

/

/

And here is one of two bowls I’ve roughed out and is soaking in the DNA.

/

-- http://caledoniachurchofchrist.yolasite.com/



4 comments so far

View ben's profile

ben

158 posts in 2614 days


#1 posted 06-06-2008 11:56 PM

Question from the ignorant—I recall having heard this someplace, but not sure where… is the spalting a toxic fungus? And is that the purpose of the DNA?

-b

View Kerux's profile

Kerux

812 posts in 2628 days


#2 posted 06-07-2008 03:06 AM

Spalting is not unnecessarily ‘toxic’ but the mold spores can cause some harm if breathed in and you are allergic.
The DNA is for faster drying time. There is a process of soaking in DNA, then bagging of the bottom of the bowl and then letting it air dry. You can go from 6-9 months drying to as low as 3-4 weeks. Then the item can be turn to desired size and shape.

You can probably web search “DNA Drying” and get a better idea.

-- http://caledoniachurchofchrist.yolasite.com/

View ryno101's profile (online now)

ryno101

380 posts in 2408 days


#3 posted 06-18-2008 03:20 PM

I also have a question… what do you use to coat the rough pieces to reduce checking?

I was coming home the other day from picking up the kiddos from daycare, and saw that a road crew had finished cutting down a giant sugar maple that was standing the day before, and I was able to grab a few chunks, in particular a nice crotch section with some obvious burls. I figure there’s bound to be some nice grain patterns in there.

My father told me when I started getting into woodworking that I’d be stopping on the side of the road to pick up wood, but I never imagined I’d be doing it in the dark by flashlight with two little ones in the car (“Daddy, why do you need that flashlight? What are you doing with that tree, Daddy?”)...

I’ve just got them sitting in the shop drying out, and after only a week, I’m already seeing checks starting in the ends… Any advice would be appreciated!

-- Ryno

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

3971 posts in 2808 days


#4 posted 06-18-2008 05:56 PM

That is an astounding load of lumber. Quilted and spalted…yeah baby!

And for those of you (like myself) who thought they would have to strike up a friendship with Gil Grissom to get some dry blanks – try Googling DeNatured Alcohol. Here's a good hit.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase