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Box Building #1: Thin Strip Sanding.

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Blog entry by Kent Shepherd posted 1203 days ago 4523 reads 8 times favorited 19 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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In my box bulding, I have been using a lot of thin strips for accent pieces, including miter splines.
Since they need to be accurate and consistent, I need an easy way to sand them. Although I own a Timesaver wide belt sander at my door shop, I do this work at my shop at home, so I don’t want to make the trip unless I’m really doing a lot of pieces.

I have a floor model Jet spindle sander, so I built a simple jig that bolts to the top.
It is simply a fence with a pivot hole at one end, and a slot at the other to adjust the thickness.
I feed the piece from one end—be sure to hang on—it will shoot out the back side. After getting the piece fed far enough, I reach over with my left hand and pull it through. It is important to maintain a steady feed speed, as it will dip if you slow down or stop. It is usually better to set it a little thick and make several passes.
Doing both sides will clean up your saw marks.



I drilled and tapped two 5/16” 18 hole in the top to accept the bolts

The jig can easily adapt to a bench top spindle sander, or even a sander on a drill press.

Thanks for looking

-- She thought I hung the moon--now she just thinks I did it wrong



19 comments so far

View Mike Gager's profile

Mike Gager

615 posts in 1900 days


#1 posted 1203 days ago

good idea, thanks

View lew's profile

lew

10002 posts in 2388 days


#2 posted 1203 days ago

I like this.

I, too, use some thin strips for my rolling pins. I was using my single point bandsaw re-sawing jig as a fence but am unsatisfied with the “smoothness” of the finished strips. Hope you don’t mind if I “borrow” this idea.

Lew

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7683 posts in 2685 days


#3 posted 1203 days ago

That is SO simple, effective, and just plain COOL!

Thank you very much!

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View Walt M.'s profile

Walt M.

243 posts in 1643 days


#4 posted 1203 days ago

That’s a good idea I don’t have a spindle sander but I bet you could do the same on a drill press with a DP table and a sanding drum

Thanks really good idea.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9492 posts in 1722 days


#5 posted 1203 days ago

I have the wood for the fence, so now I just need the tool…
Really nice idea.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Karson's profile

Karson

34870 posts in 3033 days


#6 posted 1203 days ago

great suggestion. I’ve sanded the sandpaper on my feed belt on my wide sander when going too thin. I’ll have to make one of these.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View bigike's profile

bigike

4031 posts in 1921 days


#7 posted 1203 days ago

You could do this with your drillpress too, but this seems like a better idea. I just hate drilling my tools though.

-- Ike, Big Daddies Woodshop, http://www.icombadaniels@yahoo.com

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13337 posts in 2305 days


#8 posted 1202 days ago

Neat idea.

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

View Kent Shepherd's profile

Kent Shepherd

2697 posts in 1919 days


#9 posted 1202 days ago

Ike, you could mount it to a piece of plywood and c-clamp that to your sander.
Then you wouldn’t have to drill into your machine.

-- She thought I hung the moon--now she just thinks I did it wrong

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

19393 posts in 2483 days


#10 posted 1202 days ago

Kent, you just gave me an idea for my drum sander on the drill press.
I can see it would work on it as well. Thanks for the heads up.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View RKW's profile

RKW

326 posts in 2080 days


#11 posted 1201 days ago

good idea Kent, i was planning on building an auxillary table for my thickness planer to achieve this. I may reconsider now.

-- RKWoods

View lanwater's profile

lanwater

3076 posts in 1566 days


#12 posted 1200 days ago

Great idea Kent.

Sanding those strips has been a challenge.

-- Abbas, Castro Valley, CA

View stefang's profile

stefang

12940 posts in 1967 days


#13 posted 1197 days ago

This looks good Kent. I presume you are pushing the strip through against the rotation of the sanding sleeve and that the ‘back’ you are referring to is where the operator would be standing? Just checking because I tend to misinterpret back and front on machines.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Kent Shepherd's profile

Kent Shepherd

2697 posts in 1919 days


#14 posted 1197 days ago

You are right Mike. I’m standing on the right side of the machine, feeding right to left.
I let go of one piece and it shot back out of the sander to the right. Of course I wasn’t directly behind it. There is not a lot of force, but I would rather not be hit.

-- She thought I hung the moon--now she just thinks I did it wrong

View rance's profile

rance

4130 posts in 1793 days


#15 posted 1195 days ago

I like the fact that you are not afraid to modify your tools to accomodate your work. Tools are meant to help you, and if it means drilling a small hole in the surface, then so be it. IMO, tools are meant to be used, and sometimes used up. I see folks building workbenchs using Paduk and such. I would never want to work on a bench like that, I’d be afraid of scratching it. LOL!

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

showing 1 through 15 of 19 comments

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