LumberJocks

A Piece of wood, A Story and a Pen --New found name Ekki

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Blog entry by Karson posted 1336 days ago 6171 reads 1 time favorited 33 comments Add to Favorites Watch

A had a friend that owned a sawmill in New Jersey. He was contacted by a railroad and asked him if he could make a special railroad tie that was connecting a couple of tracks and a switch mechanism.

They had gotten prices from other people that was in the range of $5,000 and more. Ernie said he’d do it for $1,500 and they supplied the wood.

When I got to the mill the ties were gone but there was an extra piece of wood that was cut off the end of one of the ties. I’ve had this piece of wood for about 10 years. It was found in the corner of my shop up on a high shelf.

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I have no idea what the wood is. This piece is 4 1/2 X 7 3/4 X 14 1/2 and there is only a couple of small cracks. (Name now found – Ekki)

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The wood is not Sapele

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The board on the left is Sapele and the sanding dust is brown. The unknown wood has an orangish sanding dust. The grain structure has something that is a little like White Oak ray flecks.

DSCI0060

So I have a piece of very heavy dark brown wood with no identified name. I’m assuming that the wood is probably a very outdoor wood. I don’t know if it was coated with tar before being placed in use.

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This picture shows the wood with Alcohol on it.

I cut off a strip of wood and made some pen blanks.

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So this is the pen made from the unknown wood.

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-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †



33 comments so far

View lew's profile

lew

9827 posts in 2253 days


#1 posted 1336 days ago

Karson,
It might be locust although I didn’t think it would be quite that dark.

Lew

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Karson's profile

Karson

34795 posts in 2899 days


#2 posted 1336 days ago

The Locust that I have is a little darker white wood

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View lew's profile

lew

9827 posts in 2253 days


#3 posted 1336 days ago

I have a little honey locust that has a grain pattern that is similar to the picture. But not quite as dark as your picture.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View rikkor's profile

rikkor

11295 posts in 2373 days


#4 posted 1336 days ago

Jatoba…?

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1613 days


#5 posted 1336 days ago

Karson excuse me for asking a little stupid
cuold it be so that he had some iron-wood around from something ells
I no its not lightly, but it sure looks like what they used last year in one of the harbors here on Ærø
does it sink if you try to put in water , then there is a chance of it is iron-wood

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

4614 posts in 2380 days


#6 posted 1336 days ago

I don’t know what it is, but that is a lot of pretty pen blanks.

Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View Karson's profile

Karson

34795 posts in 2899 days


#7 posted 1336 days ago

One of the web site state that Jatoba has an oily touch. This wood doesn’t seem to have that property.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Karson's profile

Karson

34795 posts in 2899 days


#8 posted 1336 days ago

The wood sunk like a rock. It didn’t even pretend to want to float.

The first piece of wood that I’ve ever tested like that.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6642 posts in 2478 days


#9 posted 1336 days ago

Sure looks good Karson.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View grizzman's profile (online now)

grizzman

6454 posts in 1802 days


#10 posted 1336 days ago

well whatever it is..it sure is perrty….lol..i would say you have gotten another small gold find…i think you have had some pretty good luck in your life with wood karson…the green thumb of a wood worker….beautiful pen..

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View lightweightladylefty's profile

lightweightladylefty

2482 posts in 2211 days


#11 posted 1336 days ago

So, Karson, does your test confirm ironwood? It certainly is pretty. Did you check that wood identifier site?

We’d love to know what you determined it to be.

L/W

-- Jesus is the ONLY reason for ANY season.

View mmh's profile

mmh

3242 posts in 2220 days


#12 posted 1336 days ago

The Jatoba I’ve worked with has more of a tan w/ dark brown stripped grain but is also very dense. It’s not oily like Cocobolo so it readily takes a tung oil finish.

The color of the long grain photo looks like Macawood aka: Trebol, Christobal, Granadillo among a few, but I’ve found differences in the Granadillo found at a different source so these common names are quite useless. The porous grain looks alike that of Padauk but denser. Macawood has a very fine grain and the pores of this look larger. If you burn it, what does it smell like? Padauk has a nasty smell, but Macawood is sweet.

-- "They who dream by day are cognizant of many things which escape those who dream only by night." ~ Edgar Allan Poe

View jack1's profile

jack1

1898 posts in 2525 days


#13 posted 1336 days ago

They used to get a lot of woods from south and central america years ago. I’ve heard in fact, that mahogany and ironwood were not uncommonly used as well as some others of what we would call high end woods of today. I believe they cut down anything they saw and shipped it north or east. If the wood still sinks, it’s from a rain forest I bet. I imagine you could get someone to do a test at the closest university with a decent biology or forestry department.

-- jack -- ...measure once, curse twice!

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1262 posts in 2235 days


#14 posted 1336 days ago

It could be Masaranduba. It has been widely used as railroad ties for decades in Brazil. The stuff is very hard and heavy. It is used as a demolition recycle wood for post and beam homes. The wood is generally not treated. It is now used for flooring and deck material.

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

View Karson's profile

Karson

34795 posts in 2899 days


#15 posted 1336 days ago

Mellie;

I’ve got some Macawood and Granadillo and it’s nothing like them. But thanks for your thoughts.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

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