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Heavily modified Paul Sellers workbench #3: A look under her skirt....

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Blog entry by KTMM (Krunkthemadman) posted 04-01-2012 01:49 AM 6916 reads 1 time favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Last night was a good night Part 3 of Heavily modified Paul Sellers workbench series Part 4: Into the beyond... »

I got your attention with that title, so here’s the picture…..

I began to cut the hole for the vise two nights ago, last night I actually got it mounted. I had to use 3 layers of plywood to get the clearance I needed to mount it. (I’ll try and get a picture of that when I’m under the bench again. I’m not picking it up again if I can help it.) I had my 10 year old nephew help me mount it and here are the results…

I have one coat of BLO on the top and skirts, I need to apply another coat, and get the legs coated and I’ll be 98% done. I’m lacking the vise liner which will be made of sycamore and I need to drill a couple of dog holes. I have an additional vise I’m debating on mounting to the opposite side, but I may just sell it on craigslist. I plan to post this bench as finished as soon as I have the vise liners planed, cut and installed.

William asked on the first post what additions I was to make this more tailored for carving…. I hope to post those additions once I get the bench completed.

I have not put a well board in between the two tops. At this point, I don’t know if I want to. I’m leaning towards a sliding chisel insert. Any ideas are welcome on what to put there.

-- Practice does not make perfect. Only perfect practice makes perfect. Vince Lombardi



11 comments so far

View William's profile

William

9287 posts in 1595 days


#1 posted 04-01-2012 02:00 AM

Looking good! I can’t wait to see it done.

Now, you asked for suggestions, I gots suggestions.
For the center opening, I wish I could remember where I seen this, but I liked what I seen.
It was a bench very similar to yours. The guy had several different boxes, totes, chisel blocks, and so forth. They all were sized and set to fit into the center opening of his table. He had for example, chip carving chisels in one block, regular chisels in another block, layout tools in a tray, and so on, and so on. He had one block that held various hand saws. This way he could place what he needed at any given time in the center space. Under the table was planks in measured sections he could put in places not being used as not to leave a hole for things to fall through. The totes, blocks and troughs were placed on a shelf out of the way when he wasn’t using one of them. There would have to be this since he had more sections than would fit in the table at one time.
Now, for my favorite block he had for his table. He even had one that was a coffee cup holder. This guy had thought of everything.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Dave's profile

Dave

11205 posts in 1593 days


#2 posted 04-01-2012 02:43 AM

Lucas the vice is very nice. You have done an wonderful job. It is plane and simple, you keep it that way, the better it will work. I know you have been working hard on this and it has turned out well. Great job.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View KTMM (Krunkthemadman)'s profile

KTMM (Krunkthemadman)

973 posts in 1947 days


#3 posted 04-01-2012 02:46 AM

I would be finishing the vise jaws tonight, but I think I pulled my weak tricep in my left arm. I’ll wait till tomorrow night and get back on it.

-- Practice does not make perfect. Only perfect practice makes perfect. Vince Lombardi

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

590 posts in 1252 days


#4 posted 04-01-2012 08:58 AM

Very nice work.

In the previous episode (part 2)
You were speaking about making the dado in the skirt.
I don’t know how you tried to do it by hand. I would have made multiple saw cuts spaced about a quater of an inch. Then it would be easy to knock out most of the wood. What would be left would be cleaning the bottom of the dado.
EC Emmerich is producing a “trenching saw” which seems to be specially designed to do such work.
look for trenching saw on :
http://www.ecemmerich.com/saegen.html.

Although I think for occasional work, a cross-cut back saw should work.

What are the thickness and the height of the skirt?

About the gap between the two tops,
have a look at the web site “Logan Cabinet Schoppe”

http://www.logancabinetshoppe.com/podcast-the-workbench.html

especially podcast episodes 23 (second half) & 34

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

14676 posts in 1428 days


#5 posted 04-01-2012 05:17 PM

Your bench is looking great.

Here are a couple of “Jaws” you may want to consider.

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View KTMM (Krunkthemadman)'s profile

KTMM (Krunkthemadman)

973 posts in 1947 days


#6 posted 04-01-2012 08:18 PM

Thanks for the input everyone….

William: I knew I had seen what you’re talking about at some point. That’s what I had in mind. Guess I need to do some searches and find that info again.

Sylvain: That trenching saw looks a lot like a staircase saw. I have a japanese version of that, it’s designed to start cuts anywhere in the board. I originally used the method Paul Sellers outlines on his video and book set. It involves using a knife wall and a router plane. The problem is that this oak is super tough and it’s laminated to get the thicknesses that I needed. So you can take the layers of glue into account. The dados needed to be 3.5” (or so) wide, about 7” in length, and 1/2” deep. In pine or a softwood the method would have worked out great, but with this tough stuff, I just decided to use my router and clean it up using a 5/6” and 1” chisel.
To top it all off. I cut most of the opening for the vise out by hand using a coping saw, but there was a rip cut that I couldn’t reach with my shallow coping saw. SAWZALL to the rescue…...
As far as the gap in the middle goes, that’s a great idea. It’s just the right size to get clamps , and my forearm through also.

DIY: That first jaw would make a great bottle opener, I think I could use the second as a wood chipper…...

-- Practice does not make perfect. Only perfect practice makes perfect. Vince Lombardi

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1446 days


#7 posted 04-01-2012 08:29 PM

A look up a skirt, you know I’m here! I really like the bench design. It’s always made a lot of sense to me.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

590 posts in 1252 days


#8 posted 04-01-2012 08:53 PM

As I am not a native English speaker, I am never sure what I say is understandable.

the technique I was speaking about is illustrated in this video :
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D2ab4VLKYQs

look from 1m11s to 2m18s
although in this video it is done with a handheld circular saw and not with a hand saw.
It makes some dust but not as much dust as an electric router.
The disadvantage of the electric router is that it transforms 100% of the wood machined in fine dust.
Of course you could still use a router to clean the bottom of the dado.

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

View KTMM (Krunkthemadman)'s profile

KTMM (Krunkthemadman)

973 posts in 1947 days


#9 posted 04-01-2012 09:50 PM

Actually that method would have worked great Sylvain. Its ok on the saw, I dont want to be rude. I’ve just always heard of that saw called a staircase saw, the blade on it is 90 degrees to the handle. There is also a dovetail saw, which has the blade bedded at an angle for cutting dovetails.

-- Practice does not make perfect. Only perfect practice makes perfect. Vince Lombardi

View William's profile

William

9287 posts in 1595 days


#10 posted 04-02-2012 02:45 AM

I probably won’t get to it tonight, but as soon as I can I’ll also see if I can figure out and find where I seen that at. Let me know if you find it first.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

590 posts in 1252 days


#11 posted 04-02-2012 12:32 PM

I am still new to the english woodworking vocabulary. (I have seen it first on the Emmerich web site, so I thought it was the proper name.)
I have looked for “staircase saw” and found this :

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/28417

Nearly everything is on lumberjocks, it is wonderful.

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

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