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Why I love Paul Sellers teaching....

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Blog entry by KTMM (Krunkthemadman) aka. Lucas Crenshaw posted 02-03-2012 10:50 PM 6255 reads 0 times favorited 27 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Time to kick an ant hill, or poke a sleeping badger…...

I have read a lot of woodworking books, magazines, etc. I have watched a lot of woodworking shows, instructional VHS and DVD’s. I am not an expert. This is merely an opinion, and yes I am biased.

If you want to learn hand-tool woodworking, keep up with Paul Sellers, buy his DVD and book set. They are great, and they do not pressure you to buy, buy, buy tools like certain other writers / instructors will.

Aside from the quality and great instruction gleaned from his set and courses, the following is why I really love Paul Sellers….

The following is taken from his website…

http://paulsellers.com/my-disclaimer/

My disclaimer

“In delivering sound teaching to the very broad range of people pursuing woodworking, I often feel concerned that in encouraging organisations, tool makers, show organisers and businesses, forums etc, people assume that I in some way receive remuneration and recompense for my presenting for or with them. Only three enterprises do I derive any income from or work for as a director at some level. I am the founding director for New Legacy School of Woodworking UK, founding director for New Legacy School of Woodworking New York USA and founding director of Artisan Media Ltd UK.

I have many friends in the woodworking and business spheres but beyond these three I have no obligations either contractual or implied which would make me recommend or endorse any tool or service over another.”

-- Practice does not make perfect. Only perfect practice makes perfect. Vince Lombardi



27 comments so far

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1347 days


#1 posted 02-03-2012 10:55 PM

I really admire the guy. Don’t have any of his copyrighted stuff but I’ve seen a bit online. Recommend A+.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View meikou's profile

meikou

115 posts in 2289 days


#2 posted 02-03-2012 11:59 PM

And besides all of that, he’s a really nice bloke in person.

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1309 days


#3 posted 02-04-2012 12:42 AM

Agreed. I have enourmous respect for the man and what he is trying to do.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

#4 posted 02-04-2012 01:58 AM

I look forward to meeting Mr Sellers in person one day. I hope he likes velociraptors… see my previous posts…..

-- Practice does not make perfect. Only perfect practice makes perfect. Vince Lombardi

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6819 posts in 1806 days


#5 posted 02-04-2012 05:35 AM

Amen brother!

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View BerBer5985's profile

BerBer5985

424 posts in 1074 days


#6 posted 02-04-2012 06:34 AM

I watched a few of his videos and got a chance to see him at the Baltimore show and I was amazed. Hrs incredible what he can do with chisels, a spokeshave, and a #4 plane. He really is out to teach the skills and not sell anything. His main goal is to literally spread knowledge in working with your hands. After seeing him, I bought the DVDs and I think ive learned more about woodworking than anything else I’ve seen. Its inspired me! I want to go to his classes in new York one day. I got to talk a little with him at the show and he’s a very nice guy. I also sent him an email off his blog to ask him a few questions and he was nice enough to send me a very helpful response. If you want to learn how to work with hand tools as a beginner or learn tips and tricks to improve your hand tool skills, check out his DVDs.

-- Greg, Owner, Quality Carpet One, www.qualitycarpetonecrofton.com

View William's profile

William

9025 posts in 1496 days


#7 posted 02-04-2012 07:45 AM

Uh Oh!

You forgot turtles. Don’t forget the turtle.
Sorry for anyone who doesn’t get this. All this started on another thread that got ridiculous.

I hope in the future o purchase some of Mr. Sellers videos. I’m particularly interested in some of his sharpening techniques. I have become lax in sharpening because I find the jigs and such too expensive and time consuming. I am guilty of knowingly using dull chisels because I am too intent on doing wood work instead of taking the time to set up everything for sharpening.
The few videos I have seen of Mr. Sellers online is the answer to my problems. He understands my situation and leans towards doing just what I want, get it done and get back to the wood.

Because I am in the middle of a very time consuming project, I haven’t had time to work on the method he showed on that other thread, but I am convinced that I can do it and develop more consistant sharpening habits.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Roz's profile

Roz

1659 posts in 2440 days


#8 posted 02-04-2012 05:30 PM

Sounds like Paul Sellers training is something I need to look into.

-- Terry Roswell, L.A. (Lower Alabama) "Life is what happens to you when you are making other plans."

View William's profile

William

9025 posts in 1496 days


#9 posted 02-04-2012 05:50 PM

Roz, go watch the video on the thread I linked to in my last response.
There is also a couple of links there in the original topic for further reading. I highly suggest anyone to check them out.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View BerBer5985's profile

BerBer5985

424 posts in 1074 days


#10 posted 02-04-2012 08:06 PM

As far as the sharpening, I was in the same boat. I bought the worksharp 3000 and a few more wheels and all that. I have some waterstones with the veritas jig and the whole works. After watching Paul at the Baltimore show and the way he sharpened seemed like I was making way more out of it than what it is. I understand bevel angles and all that still, but honestly, how much difference does it make if the bevel is 25 degrees or 27 degrees? As long as it’s close and honed to a mirror edge, it will work just fine. I tried his methods after purchasing some leather pieces and some honing paste and just freehanded it and now I’m wondering why I wasted all the time and money on the worksharp. I actually invested in a set of diasharp diamond stones because the water stones have to be flattened so often and I haven’t looked back. Everything I’ve sharpened freehand has been absolutely razor sharp in a couple minutes per tool using his method. He sharpens everything with a slight convex bevel similar to a knife edge and its so much easier to get a sharp edge. After messing with a few days, I went and resharpened all my chisels that I had done on the worksharp and they cut better. My arm hair is literally all shaved off on one arm from testing them all. haha! Time to switch to paper to check I think. Now I think I’m ready to sell the worksharp 3000. Anyone interested?? haha

-- Greg, Owner, Quality Carpet One, www.qualitycarpetonecrofton.com

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6819 posts in 1806 days


#11 posted 02-04-2012 09:57 PM

He has been a great antidote to a lot of the misleading information out there that just makes you want to buy a new powertool. With powertools your are constantly having to buy a new expensive tool to do say a mortis (mortising drill press), or a tennon (tennon jig), dovetails (DT jig) what he teaches is the skill to use a simple handsaw to do all of the above. Most of us don’t wood work in a production environment and we don’t need those things, we just need to learn the hand tool skills.

I do like Paul Sellers sharpening method. I’ve gotten away from using jigs and do everything free hand now and it’s a lot faster and not hard at all. I color my bevels with a sharpie and make sure I stay close to the same angle.

But I haven’t put a full convex bevel on any chisel yet. I guess like Paul says in his blog he kind of came about it naturally as his secondary bevel naturally rounds and gets bigger and bigger. That’s probably the rout I’m on.

I do think your removing a lot more metal and if you are using sandpaper like me and you don’t change it as often as you should it takes longer. With good stones I think his method is great. I like what he says about letting one side of the stone dish out and keep the other side flat for the other side of the chisel. When I get some stones I will do this.

I’ve gone through and read every one of his blogs on his site. He shares some amazing stuff you don’t read anywhere else. I highly recommend it.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

#12 posted 02-04-2012 10:15 PM

His blog is also very informative if you haven’t read it.

I can tell you from my standpoint, I will be paying for my woodworking education for a few more years. I bought a lot of power tools, the best I could buy, and I put them on credit…. I had almost every woodworking power tool with the exception of a mortiser. I hated going in my shop and couldn’t move around in it by the time my shopping spree had hit it’s end. I went from wood working to wood machining. My projects all turned out great, but they had no heart to them. I got to the point I was tired of producing replicas of the crap people call furniture these days. I managed to get a Tormek at a good price earlier in 2011, but I sold it this week since I no longer need it. I can’t justify keeping a $500 machine, when I only sharpen tools every other month. I’ve traded my table saw and Incra set up because it just took up too much space. I look forward to having a band saw soon, but I think that’ll be the only major power tool aside from my cheap thickness planer I have right now.

I’m going against the force-fed, magazine cover woodworking these days. I don’t like water stones, don’t get me wrong they work great. The feel of them reminds me too much of grouting my tile floor, and I really hate that feeling. But guess what, I’ll agree with anyone that they work faster than my oilstones. I just got my set of diamond stones this week and I use my norton oilstones for a lot of work already. Not popular methods by most modern magazine and book accounts, they work for me, and I like the way they feel.

Let me drop a few more bombs here….

I used to like plywood, I hate it now days (except for speaker building, and it better be good stuff)
I used to like tablesaws, I hate them now. (I like my fingers)
I used to like jointers, I hate them now. (I can run my #5 and #7 a few passes and they only take minutes to set up)

Am I saying that machines don’t work, Nope. Am I saying that they don’t produce good work, Nope. They aren’t for me anymore. I learned that lesson the hard way, and had I gotten Paul’s series from day one. I’d be about $5000 richer right now.

I think I just put my inner velociraptor at peace.

-- Practice does not make perfect. Only perfect practice makes perfect. Vince Lombardi

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6819 posts in 1806 days


#13 posted 02-04-2012 10:27 PM

Agreed, feeding wood through machines is drudgery, Respirator, ear protection, safety glasses. Thet don’t show that part on any TV show. It sucks.

I also cant afford top of the line woodworking tools and if I could I would refuse to pay the money they cost. Hand tools put and end to all that madness. However, I did get a band saw and have been using if for all my ripping. I’m not fully ready to get rid of the other power tolls yet though.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1347 days


#14 posted 02-04-2012 10:44 PM

^Mauricio, from a guy that’s spent the last week powermilling, I can’t agree with you enough. They’ve got their place in my shop, for sure, but the romance definitely isn’t there. If I find that elusive 1 ton 12 inch Oliver one day, perhaps I can rekindle. For the meantime, milling out of necessity; handtools for therapy:)

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View BerBer5985's profile

BerBer5985

424 posts in 1074 days


#15 posted 02-04-2012 11:14 PM

KTMM, I agree with everything. I started buying up power tools and I still use my jointer and planer to mill the wood as well as the bandsaw to resaw and things. Just much quicker and efficient, but I’m tempted to sell my router and router table in exchange for some molding planes. I still use my table saw for ripping pieces to length frankly because it’s accurate and fast. I’ve started to acquire more and more hand tools and I’ve been enjoying it. I wish I had seen Paul Sellers before I got into woodworking though and I too would have saved a lot of money. It seems a lot of woodworkers, including Christopher Schwartz, seem take the same path before they realize what they should have done from the start. Live and learn and enjoy. haha! Luckily I’m fairly new, so I’m hoping I’ve realized it early on.

-- Greg, Owner, Quality Carpet One, www.qualitycarpetonecrofton.com

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