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Half scale Bombe Jewelry Box #3: Half scale Bombe # 4

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Blog entry by KPW posted 04-19-2012 08:32 PM 1742 reads 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Progress on the case Part 3 of Half scale Bombe Jewelry Box series Part 4: Part # 5 »

Well, I’m finally back to my Bombe’ chest again. Sorry for the wait but I came to realize that my carving skills left alot to be desired. As a matter of fact they were practically none exsistant! So here are some more pics please exscuse the bad B&C feet.

-- Ken --------- never try and put 5 lbs. of tenon in a 3 lb. mortise.



12 comments so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112298 posts in 2263 days


#1 posted 04-19-2012 08:51 PM

Hey Ken this all looks great to me ,thanks for the update on your blog I look forward to more updates.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View KPW's profile

KPW

223 posts in 1055 days


#2 posted 04-19-2012 09:01 PM

Thanks Jim, Practice,practice,practice. I went through about ten blanks. Can’t wait to do one full scale. It’ll be a breeze.

-- Ken --------- never try and put 5 lbs. of tenon in a 3 lb. mortise.

View BTimmons's profile

BTimmons

2140 posts in 1171 days


#3 posted 04-19-2012 09:53 PM

That looks really cool! As for the carving, it looks like you’re working with pine? That’s got to be difficult to get good results with such weak fibers. I’ll bet that if you tried it on mahogany it would be easier going.

-- Brian Timmons - http://www.BigTWoodworks.com

View KPW's profile

KPW

223 posts in 1055 days


#4 posted 04-19-2012 10:06 PM

Thanks Brian, It’s actually Fir. It’s pretty hard,but the grain is a little funky.

-- Ken --------- never try and put 5 lbs. of tenon in a 3 lb. mortise.

View mpounders's profile

mpounders

737 posts in 1582 days


#5 posted 04-20-2012 03:22 PM

It looks really good! You have a good eye for all the form and details of the carving and you did a fantastic job on the feet. Especially when I see the tools you probably used! Ramelsons are not bad tools, but yours don’t look to be especially sharp? And while the Exacto knife is sharp, it is not a great choice for carving. A lot of people get discouraged when carving, because of dull tools and difficult wood, and I would hate to see someone with talent give it up. My carvings really improved when I purchased some Flexcut gouges and realized what “sharp” really was! When carving, sharpness is critical, and if the wood fibers crush and tear instead of being cleanly sliced, then you need to strop or sharpen some more! I think you have more carving skills than you might realize!

-- Mike P., Arkansas, http://mikepounders.weebly.com

View KPW's profile

KPW

223 posts in 1055 days


#6 posted 04-20-2012 08:58 PM

Thanks for the encouragement Mike. I just might take your advice on the Flexcuts. Are they readily available?

-- Ken --------- never try and put 5 lbs. of tenon in a 3 lb. mortise.

View KPW's profile

KPW

223 posts in 1055 days


#7 posted 04-20-2012 09:10 PM

Mike, I checked out the Flexcut line on Traditional Woodworker. Do you think the beginners boxed set with the sharpening block would be a good place to start?

-- Ken --------- never try and put 5 lbs. of tenon in a 3 lb. mortise.

View mpounders's profile

mpounders

737 posts in 1582 days


#8 posted 04-20-2012 10:26 PM

Ken, you can get Flexcuts from a variety of places. I’m not sure if I looked at the same one you did (was it $185?). It is usually not recommended that you buy sets, because you typically end up witha lot of gouges in profiles you will never use and although that is not a bad price for what you get, I really don’t like swapping blades! It is not difficult to make handles for the individual gouges, but I prefer the palm handled Flexcut tools like this set . Or buy the individual tools that are similar in size and shape to the ones you found most useful in your current set. I have the Flexcut slipstrop and honing compound and like both, but you will probaly find their strop a little short to be real useful. You can make your own easily or even just use wood or cardboard with the compound. I still use my Flexcuts, but I have gradually been buying the individual full-size Pfeil gouges, as I can afford them, and in sizes and profiles that I think I need. The larger tools can provide additional power and be used with mallets, or choked up and used for smaller carvings. Two Cherries and Henry Taylors are also upgrades for the Flexcuts. but try a few of them first and see how they cut. And different places also offer sharpening services. One of the best things I ever did was to pay a guy to sharpen all my gouges… I was able to maintain that sharpness for quite some time, just by honing, and I was able to see what sharp meant, and eventually duplicate that, with some practice. I buy a lot of stuff from these guys and this place , but Woodcraft is the only plae that sells Pfeil.

-- Mike P., Arkansas, http://mikepounders.weebly.com

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6663 posts in 2666 days


#9 posted 04-23-2012 10:37 PM

Hi Ken;

My thoughts were about the same as Mike’s. The tools look like they were working against you, instead of with you. It makes a huge difference. Mahogany is much easier to carve, too.
And, as you said, practice…

I personally, use Ashley Isles carving tools. Pricey, but worth it. If I were just getting started with carving, I would probably go with Japanese carving tools. I like the edge they keep.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View KPW's profile

KPW

223 posts in 1055 days


#10 posted 04-24-2012 01:13 PM

Thanks for the advice Lee

-- Ken --------- never try and put 5 lbs. of tenon in a 3 lb. mortise.

View jeanmarc's profile

jeanmarc

1886 posts in 2403 days


#11 posted 05-04-2012 05:49 PM

What wood did you use

-- jeanmarc manosque france

View KPW's profile

KPW

223 posts in 1055 days


#12 posted 05-04-2012 06:04 PM

Thanks for the interest Jeanmarc. This started out as sort of a practice piece for a full size version but ended up as a great gift for my wifes birthday. I just used some 2×12 construction fir for the sides,draw fronts and feet. The dividers are White pine along with the draw parts, base and top.

-- Ken --------- never try and put 5 lbs. of tenon in a 3 lb. mortise.

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