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Blog series by Jon3 updated 07-13-2009 04:30 PM 5 parts 29455 reads 18 comments total

Part 1: Introduction and Radius Cutter

07-07-2009 09:59 PM by Jon3 | 1 comment »

I was very intruiged by Steve Latta’s DVD for Lie-Nielsen “Fundamentals of Inlay: Stringing, Line & Berry” and the associated line of inlay tools that they offer along with it. I learned (by way of the Villiage Carpenter) that Steve has been touching a longer course on inlay for quite some time, and used to advocate the manufacture of your own tools, in the style that Lie-Nielsen is now offering. When looking at those offerings, I did think that several of them could...

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Part 2: Radius Cutter complete

07-08-2009 03:52 PM by Jon3 | 7 comments »

Cut off and mounted, the brass point actually looks kind of nice. I’ll just be a little less generous with the epoxy next time, so I don’t end up with that overfill bead. I mounted the radius cutter, going about 1/16th to 1/8th deeper than the brass pivot point, so that the cutter will remain as perpendicular to the work as possible. Since the holes in the cutter to attach it to the tool are oval, there is some room for adjustment later on. It isn’t perfect, ...

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Part 3: Inlay Tools #3: Straight Line Cutter

07-10-2009 02:55 PM by Jon3 | 5 comments »

The next tool up is the straight line cutter. This looked at lot more straightforward than the radius cutter, but it does still require a nice uniform mortise to hold the cutter support beam. I used Cherry on the first tool, but I decided to go for some scrap Sipo (afraican mahogany) I had left over from another project, since I wanted to make the tool nice and thick. Like the first tool, all I had was a resized and pixelated image from the L-N website, the cutter, and some thin brass ba...

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Part 4: Slicing Gauge

07-13-2009 04:22 PM by Jon3 | 2 comments »

With my straight line cutter complete, I moved on to the slicing gauge. This tool, along with a slicing board (which is really just a board with a lip to hold the inlay material up against) allows you to cut (a ripping action) long thin strips from your inlay sheet stock. This is the first part of making the inlay material itself. Here is my ‘raw materials’ shot. I went with a curly spalted maple body, and a Sipo cutter support bar left over from the previous tool’s offcuts....

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Part 5: Thicknessing Gauge

07-13-2009 04:30 PM by Jon3 | 3 comments »

Once again, I went for some more of that curly spalted maple offcut. I spent some time seeing if I could figure out how to make my own tooling from a spare card scraper, my my first attemps to cut down hardened stock were a pretty big failure. I picked up the L-N cutters, since they’re only $15 and appropriately sized already, and went to town. This is by far the simplest tool in the batch. Really, its just a block of wood with 2 cuts, 2 rabbets, and 4 screws. I didn’t thin...

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