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Workshop by posted 07-12-2007 12:34 PM 2068 reads 1 time favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

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MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2916 days


#1 posted 07-12-2007 12:39 PM

I thought I was having blurry vision when I looked at the map loading.. and then I read “Japan”! :)

what kind of woodworking do you do? or are you interested in?

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

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593 posts in 2727 days


#2 posted 07-12-2007 12:59 PM

Hi Debbie! Thanks for your comment. No, don’t get you eyes checked, they (presumably) work just fine. :o)

If you look at my profile you’ll see that now I do not have a shop -sigh!- due to certain factors associated with the lifestyle here but my thing is cabinetmaking with sporadic incursions in multiple aspects of the craft as carving and others.

Of course, living here I can’t pass on the opportunity of learning the art of traditional japanese interior design like shoji panels (rice paper divisions), fusuma (sliding silk doors), tansu (cabinetry) and so on. Also I’m fascinated by the traditional joinery pacticed here. I’ve never seen anything like that!

PS: I’ve looking through your projects and I have to say that I really like that raw/rustic look of most of them. I think it somehow help us to connect with the natural side of the material and that special feeling that conveys.

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MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2916 days


#3 posted 07-12-2007 02:14 PM

thanks “Shopless in Kyoto” .. perhaps you should add something like “but not inspiration-less”

I haven’t made anything “rustic” lately. Been to busy with building a shed.. but hopefully soon, I can get back at it.

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 2916 days


#4 posted 07-12-2007 05:29 PM

I hope you get the opportunity for a shop again soon JoJo.

Wow, that must be a great learning experience to see new ways of doing things, learning skills that have been used for hundreds of years, and the wonderful creations they turn out.

If you can’t build it, you can take pictures and show us what types of works they create. You could post them in your blog.

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

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593 posts in 2727 days


#5 posted 07-12-2007 05:47 PM

Thanks Bill, I’m sure I will have it… once I relocate across the pond.

Indeed the joinery job here is amazing. Did you know that the tall pagodas, some of which are more than 200 ft in height, are assembled without any nails? Just by the pure art of joinery? And that they are the only kind of buildings that have been resisting all the very frequent earthquakes during more than a thousand years? They even studied the fact and some years ago the scientists here build a simulator, basically a big hydraulically shaking platform with a scale reproduction of one of those placed on top and they weren’t able to destroy it by any means, even with the highest equivalent forces in the earthquake scales. It’s simply amazing.

I’m gonna dig in my iPhoto Library and find some pics to post.

Nice job on your gallery. I particularly like the clever design and the effect of the contrasting woods on the artist’s box.

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Bill

2579 posts in 2916 days


#6 posted 07-12-2007 05:52 PM

That is quite interesting about the joinery. I bet we could learn a few things from them on that.

I am looking forward to the pictures.

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 2577 days


#7 posted 04-07-2008 04:42 PM

Hi Jojo,

You have a beautiful collection of tools. You can do far more with your hand tools than most can with an arsenal of power tools. I have a new found respect and admiration for those woodworkers who either by choice or by circumstances pursue the hand tool route. This is a true craftsman’s approach to the hobby/profession.

Thanks for the post.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

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593 posts in 2727 days


#8 posted 04-07-2008 05:20 PM

Thank you Scott, you might think your shop is small but what would I do for having it… even it my wife would get mad at me for making sawdust! :o)

It is actually way mor hard and dangerous to work without a real shop and specially a proper workbench but you got to do what you got to do, isn’t it?

BTW, I always loved the simplicity and elegance of your plant stand. I’d never though it is made of construction grade lumber!

View Francisco Luna's profile

Francisco Luna

936 posts in 2148 days


#9 posted 03-18-2009 07:19 PM

Your space is unvelibable….I hope you find soon the space/shop you wish.
I live in a small apartment here in California (lost my shop recently) and I have found the traditional Japanese woodworking as a response to take advantage of my space limitations…..I am reading a book from a shokunin, Toshio Odate, very helpful to me in this way…...

Ludwing Mies Van der Rohe, one of the most important european Architects of XX century said: “Less is More”

-- Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain" Frank Lloyd Wright

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593 posts in 2727 days


#10 posted 03-19-2009 02:53 AM

Thank you Moai. We are working our way to the States so I expect to get that elusive shop one day.

Sorry to hear about the loss of your shop, did the crisis got to claim your business? No bailouts for a finish carpenter? How bizarre from the politicians, isn’t it…? :o(

I just hope you’ve been able to keep your great workbench, I’d kill for one like that. It’s true that the tools of the trade here are very well defined by the confined spaces we have to live in but it is also true that many people here romanticizes The Japanese Way too much. Should they try to work holding a board with their feet while seating on the ground and thinking which foot tendon would be cut when (not “if”) that sharp chisel will slip, they’d start to appreciate their workbench and Western kind of woodworking much more. Not to talk about cleaning up the mess in the ”tatami” after each session.

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593 posts in 2727 days


#11 posted 12-01-2009 07:54 PM

The times they are a-changin’ around here lately… and not for the best.

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