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Underway again...finally #5: Baby steps... or are they actual steps?

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Blog entry by JohnTM posted 11-03-2017 11:47 PM 2306 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Actual work accomplished...such as it is/was/whatever Part 5 of Underway again...finally series Part 6: College Football Day freebie haul »

Big plans, small accomplishments, a couple of them actually.

I’d intended to actually start on the workbench today (sound familiar?) but got side-tracked, as is becoming usual. I notice that many people are counter-sinking screws (mostly for looks, but also for smooth-fit functionality at times) and I remember way back when that my Dad had done this with an over-sized drill bit just drilling slightly below the top surface of the wood. NO big news to you old guys, I’m sure. So I decided to try that on a couple pieces of scrap and was amazed at how difficult it was to manually/hand- drill consistently depth-wise. Obviously some of that difficulty is surely due to mere inexperience on my part. But there’s an obvious solution and I took that easy way out.

A trip to HF with 20% coupon in hand brought me 6 counter-sink bits of various sizes for ~$10. I admit to buying 3, walking over to McDonalds next door for a burger and then going back into HF for the other 3 using a 2nd 20% off coupon (and yes, I really took advantage and used 2 more “free blue tarp with any purchase” coupons – shame on me). Anyway, headed back home and realized the bits don’t sit well in drawers without “help”. I noticed the little router bit box for the set of router bits I’d bought was simple and contained two 1”x1”x4” strips with half a dozen holes drilled in them using a clear plastic piece as the top. Bright (okay dim) light showed up above my head and I figured, “I can do that”. So, my second distraction for the day.

Break out the HF drill press for its inaugural run and more minutes later than it should have taken, I had the scrap wood drilled. But, an “oops” reared its ugly head, of course. I had drilled all the way through the scrap piece so the bits sank through the board. No problem, think I. I have more scrap wood. And I can glue my first pieces together too! Whee! And use my clamps! Double whee! The end result is on the right side of the table saw top in the pic below – your 3 year old kid could probably do this in 1/4 of the time it took me as I futzed around cutting scrap wood way too much.

While doing that I realized my table saw’s mitre gauge had more slop than was acceptable so I scratched myself (get your minds out of the gutter guys… I scratched the other end ) trying to remember if I’d heard, read or seen a video on solving that and, surprise, surprise, I had. There are a few youtube videos on inexpensively solving just this problem. Blue painter’s tape to the rescue… three layers, actually. But there’s no side-to-side slop now and the mitre gauge slides smoothly along the length of both slots.

Wasn’t there something else I’d considered doing to the mitre gauge? More scratching and another dim light bulb began to illuminate rarely used and aging memory cells actually beginning to show positive results. Another simple “fix” from the youtube realm came to mind. Attach a piece of wood to the front of the mitre gauge extending to just shy of the blade. It provides more support for pieces when using the mitre gauge. Really simple idea, right? I mean, isn’t this really just as simple as the counter-sink bit holder “solution” above?

In case you haven’t guessed already, I seem to be able to make simple things more complex and “difficult” than they need to be. Even when I move at a seemingly glacial pace. It only took 3 different pieces of scrap wood and rounding the heads of 2 screws to get it right. Eventually, I went to hand screwing the pieces together rather than using a powered drill to screw the piece of wood to the mitre gauge back. I made this way too difficult…waaaaaaay too difficult. Again, I think a 3 year old could have accomplished it in far less time. Oh, did I mention that I split two pieces of wood doing this due to over-tightening the screw?
That’s it for the day.
Way too much information on way too small “an” accomplishment (skill level – negative 7 on a 0-10 scale).
But it’s progress, such as it is.



4 comments so far

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

915 posts in 568 days


#1 posted 11-04-2017 03:57 AM

Don’t sweat it. We’ve all drilled too deep. Another option. I just bought a 7 bit set at HF last week for $6.49 after the coupon (and the free tarp) and they came in a black plastic case. They are great cuz they are tapered so they are kind of a 3 in 1 thing. Pilot hole, screw hole and countersink all in one. I also bought the set you bought a few months ago but these are a better buy IMO and a lot handier to use.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View JohnTM's profile

JohnTM

91 posts in 243 days


#2 posted 11-04-2017 03:59 AM

There were 2 different 3 counter-sink bit sets. My local store didn’t have the 6 bit set.

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

915 posts in 568 days


#3 posted 11-04-2017 05:18 AM

It’s not really 22 pieces. Each bit is made up of 3 parts plus the allen wrench. Worth every “bit” of $6.49 not to mention the free tarp! :-). I still use the coutersink ones which also come in handy at times.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View JohnTM's profile

JohnTM

91 posts in 243 days


#4 posted 11-04-2017 06:46 PM

Yeah, I got the set pictured above on the left as well as another 3 piece set with different sizes. My local HF didn’t have the one on the right, which I would have preferred. But, what I did buy should work, so I’m relatively “happy” (meaning I ought to be able to do what I think I want to do with what I bought). Price-wise, it came out about the same using 2-20% off coupons.

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