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Projects #5: wood wall mounted computer

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Blog entry by JohnAjluni posted 1234 days ago 1896 reads 0 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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It sorta involves wood?:)

-- John



17 comments so far

View William's profile (online now)

William

8975 posts in 1469 days


#1 posted 1234 days ago

I wasn’t going to even comment on this video, but I decided to do it anyway. I have so far watched your other woodworking videos. I sat through this one too. Anytime I see very young people on here and have the chance, I try to support them. You young ones are the future of wood working.
All that being said, 99.99% of this video I had NO EARTHLY IDEA what you were talking about.
I’m glad someone understands all this computer talk, because someone has to fix them. However, as long as mine comes on and does what I want it to do, I’m good. All the various parts you showed and named on that were on that piece of particle board though may as well have been spaceship parts from Mars. I don’t know what they are, nor do I care to.
In the future, I hope to see more woodworking videos from you. I have to be honest with you though. No amount of coffee in the world, no matter how strong, is going to make me sit through another six plus minute video of computer parts. I’m sorry.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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superstretch

1494 posts in 1319 days


#2 posted 1234 days ago

Wow.. eSATA and pre-DDR SDRAM? Not sure that what you’re calling eSATA is eSATA.. it might just be SATA. eSATA connectors have a different connector end and usually power external drives. What is the CPU on the first board? AMD 3400+?

FYI, the blue connectors are normally line input, the orange are side channels, and the black are rear channels (surround sound.. although most audio utilities can retask outputs). The black square-ish connection is a fiber SPDIF connection. The older style drive headers are IDE/PATA. From what I recall, they have a transfer rate of 100-150MBps, vs SATA (1.5GBps), SATA II (3.0GBps), and SATAIII (6.0GBps).

Just a couple more things.. the fan might be better blowing across the components. I don’t think it will accomplish much on the back side of the CPU socket. One thing you’ll run into is warm components because there’s no airflow with completely exposed components. The case normally acts as a wind tunnel if fans are set up correctly. The hard drives, southbridge, RAM, and any expansion cards need some cooling love too. Because of this, most exposed systems I’ve come across or built use water cooling for the CPU, SB, RAM, and gfx card. Lastly, the case acts as a ground for the motherboard and other components. Removing that has the ability to make ESD more catastrophic.

That being said: how did you attach the motherboard to the particle board? Risers? Imagine sliding that board inside of a nice, antique desk or furniture piece? You’re one step closer to http://suissacomputers.com !

-- Dan, Rochester, NY

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JohnAjluni

102 posts in 1261 days


#3 posted 1234 days ago

my bad about the esata connectors! meant to say sata and I tried to put it into a nice piece of furniture but mom wouldnt let me:)

-- John

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superstretch

1494 posts in 1319 days


#4 posted 1234 days ago

understandable.. You could wall mount it..

Growing up, I had the idea to have the components mounted to my bedroom wall and have long cables that connected everything. I never did follow through with that, but I did build something else:

http://zomgee.com/2008/08/04/project-carputer-part-3
http://zomgee.com/2008/08/17/project-carputer-part-4

By the time I was done with it, the array of 4 fans in the front split off so that 2 forced air through aluminum flex pipe up to the two main vents around the monitor and 2 went straight for the case.

-- Dan, Rochester, NY

View William's profile (online now)

William

8975 posts in 1469 days


#5 posted 1234 days ago

It’s been bothering me about my earlier response. I had to come back and express to you that I was in no way trying to discourage your work. As Superstretch demonstrated, some people are interested in the computer related stuff. I think it’s great that you have the knowledge to put all that on a plain piece of wood. You’ll need that kind of knowledge in today’s world. I was only putting out the fact that I watched the whole thing thinking it would move back towards something wood related. Instead, it went deeper and deeper into the bowels of computer knowledge and terms that I was lost in. I know from now on that halfway through if this is the case, to move on.
Keep having fun with wood.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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superstretch

1494 posts in 1319 days


#6 posted 1234 days ago

Some of the most interesting pieces on LJ are crosses between woodworking and something else—tables with river rocks inlaid in them, wooden machines whose function is outside the scope of woodworking, artistic pieces combining pottery or other items and wood. Proof of concept for a wood-mounted computer setup could be the launching point of a hobby, awesome project, or even a career. William, don’t feel bad.. I know I’d rather have a comment (that sounds like an old person saying “dem daggone blasted com-pooters”) than not have one at all..

-- Dan, Rochester, NY

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AttainableApex

338 posts in 1459 days


#7 posted 1233 days ago

thanks William
for telling me he just talks about his computer.

-- Ben L

View lew's profile

lew

9992 posts in 2382 days


#8 posted 1233 days ago

John,
Take care when using a non conductive base- like wood. This is especially true with the newer versions of mobos. Manufactures are having difficulty creating PCBs that have continuously connected ground traces. They are relying on the metal case- or at least a metal mounting plane to complete all electrical grounding. You may have noticed this if you ever built a computer and forgot a stand off (metal mounting post) or a mounting screw, the computer may not boot or respond erratically.

As for fans, air movement is more efficient when “pulled” instead of “pushed”. That’s why you always feel air being exhausted out of the rear of the case. As for cooling an open build, I have never had much of a problem with heat problems over the chip set. However, even slight overclocking will raise the current/heat level of the components so a fan moving air over the heat sinks is a good idea- as Dan said.

Just a couple of things to consider.

Lew

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

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nobuckle

1120 posts in 1387 days


#9 posted 1233 days ago

Speak English man! Just kidding! Lots of cool techy stuff. Perhaps putting the mobo on some risers will help keep the CPU cooler. Anyway, fun video for geeks like us.

-- Doug - Make an effort to live by the slogan "We try harder"

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JohnAjluni

102 posts in 1261 days


#10 posted 1233 days ago

lew- I realized that after that fact but this computer is not so important to me and wont bothere me if it gets fried by static electricity. you know any grounding methods?

-- John

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JohnAjluni

102 posts in 1261 days


#11 posted 1233 days ago

once again my apologizes for falls info!

-- John

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lew

9992 posts in 2382 days


#12 posted 1233 days ago

The precaution I mentioned is NOT for static protection. It is for basic electrical circuit connections that are normally completed thru the metal case.

Two ways you could do it come to mind immediately- you’ll need to use stand offs for both

First- but not necessarily the best- you could use a heavy sheet of tin foil with the same footprint as the mobo. Lay it on on the OSB. Screw the stand offs into the OSB thru the tin foil. This will, in effect, ground all of the stand offs together. Then use an alligator clip lead (or just a bare wire) to connect the tin foil to the PS.

The second method- and in my opinion a more functional setup- would be to get crimp on wire terminals http://www.radioshack.com/family/index.jsp?categoryId=2032283 like the one here. Mount one under each of the stand offs- between the OSB and the standoff. Connect a wire from one stand off to the next and then a final connection to a screw on the power supply case. This will ground all of the mobo ground pads when the mobo is screwed down to the stand offs.

Lew

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

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superstretch

1494 posts in 1319 days


#13 posted 1233 days ago

It seems silly for manufacturers to assume that they’ll have a case to ground to at all. I’ve even gotten motherboards that included plastic standoffs. Slick.

-- Dan, Rochester, NY

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JohnAjluni

102 posts in 1261 days


#14 posted 1233 days ago

would it matter if the power supply case wasnt grounded?

-- John

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lew

9992 posts in 2382 days


#15 posted 1233 days ago

Once upon a time, mobo manufactures used 3 layer PCBs but with today’s newest boards there are more layers. The more layers, the more difficult to complete the circuits. I don’t think you will find any of the recent offerings using the plastic stand off any more.

Yes, it does matter if the PS is grounded to the rest of the components. Grounding provides positive circuit completion, RF control and of course static grounding.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

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