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Ambrosia-birdseye maple #12: The finish is nearly done

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Blog entry by JoeyG posted 949 days ago 1244 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 11: first coat of poly Part 12 of Ambrosia-birdseye maple series Part 13: Time for the wrapping paper!!!!!!! »

Sometimes it can be difficult to recall the steps on takes and where I start and stop on this blog. I also tend to switch steps around sometimes depending on how the project is going.

My next step after the first coat of poly on the lids and sides was to flip the box, put 2 coats of poly on, sanding with 400 grit paper in between coats and applying my label. I haven’t invested in a branding iron yet so my solution is to use double sided carpet tape and a business card. I will find out how well these stand up to my kids carrying them around the house for a year or so and decide if I need to come up with a new idea. So far these seem very sturdy. The cards I bought have a nice glossy finish on them and we all know how strong carpet tape is.

Once the bottoms have fully dried I flip them back over, re-sand and add another coat of poly

I wanted to share this picture with you also. It is a different project but since I am going over finishing a little, I felt that this is kind of important to know and may help you out. As you can see in the picture I have several kinds of wood laminated together and then sanded through. Each wood finishes differently and poses it’s own challenges. In this case the poly likes to raise the grain in walnut. This needs to be sanded out and re coated as many times as it takes to get the finish you want. The important thing is that you have to sand everything else a little extra. The padauk will have a high gloss after just a couple of coats, while the walnut will take a few more. To keep it all even I sand down the other woods a little extra. Basically I make sure I take all of the glossiness away from the other woods until I have a uniform dulled look. I will try to capture this in a photo and maybe add it to the comments later. This is one of those times, I am sure someone has a better method or idea and I would love to hear them.

Thanks for joining me, I know I have said that at least every other post, but I truly mean it. I have learned a lot from your comments and from the process of trying to document how I do things. I have to think about what I am doing and why so that I can explain it and I think that doing this blog and helped me become just a little better in the shop.

Thanks again, the next stop will be the finished projects page. Enjoy the dust.

Joey

-- JoeyG ~~~ http://www.facebook.com/JHGWoodWorks



5 comments so far

View MyChipCarving's profile

MyChipCarving

462 posts in 1720 days


#1 posted 949 days ago

I’m wondering if several coats of sanding sealer before the topcoat would solve the issues with different types of wood and how they take the poly topcoat. Sanding sealer dries very quickly and may save time too. it’s worth a try!

-- Marty, https://www.MyChipCarving.com, 866-444-6996

View JoeyG's profile

JoeyG

1233 posts in 1220 days


#2 posted 949 days ago

sanding sealer would make it easier, but not having any I have to do the next best thing. lol. I think the biggest problem is that the finish I am using is water based. It causes the grain to raise more than other finishes do. But I don’t have to deal with toxic waste. I think the next time I go to a big box store I will pic up some. Do you have one that you use? My biggest concern is something that changes the color of the wood. I haven’t used any in years and then I used a brand made for commercial production use. So I don’t have any experience with off the shelf stuff.

Thanks for the idea

-- JoeyG ~~~ http://www.facebook.com/JHGWoodWorks

View Dkol's profile

Dkol

70 posts in 1956 days


#3 posted 949 days ago

Joey,

You might consider 1lb cut Shellac as a sanding sealer. No real toxic stuff, just denatured alcohol, dries extremely fast and sands nicely.

View MyChipCarving's profile

MyChipCarving

462 posts in 1720 days


#4 posted 947 days ago

I use Zinsser Universal Sanding Sealer, 100% wax-free and no toxic waste. Available in most home centers. Basically it is just thinned down shellac. I like it.

-- Marty, https://www.MyChipCarving.com, 866-444-6996

View JoeyG's profile

JoeyG

1233 posts in 1220 days


#5 posted 947 days ago

Thank you, I will have to pick some up. It might save me a few coats of finish and a bit of elbow grease.

-- JoeyG ~~~ http://www.facebook.com/JHGWoodWorks

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