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new ideas #1: lumber yard

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Blog entry by JoeyG posted 03-21-2011 07:53 PM 1380 reads 0 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of new ideas series Part 2: what to build? »

I have been looking through the pictures here on LJ and I feel the beginnings of a idea forming. I have a couple of things I would like to make, but no real clear picture. So I go to the lumber yard and they have a cabinet shop, mill shop set up and ask about shorts they may have on hand. To my pleasant surprise, I find out that I can get a 20 percent discount on shorts. And the greatest part is that they mill up different stuff every week so I never know what I may find. Since I am working on small projects, and looking to become more artistic in my woodworking, this is perfect. I picked up a chunk of 8/4 walnut, 4/4 cherry, and 6/4 curly maple. It is all beautiful pieces. Now the hard part…......WHAT TO BUILD????? I’ll be back to share my journey with you

-- JoeyG ~~~ http://www.facebook.com/JHGWoodWorks



15 comments so far

View Vince's profile

Vince

985 posts in 2151 days


#1 posted 03-21-2011 09:57 PM

What are the lengths of these shorts? Sounds like a good deal for making boxes.

-- Vince

View emart's profile

emart

271 posts in 1350 days


#2 posted 03-21-2011 10:18 PM

could laminate them and turn bowls or use a plunge router and make square bowls.

-- tools are only as good as the hands that hold them https://www.custommade.com/by/emeraldcrafts/

View twokidsnosleep's profile

twokidsnosleep

1063 posts in 1696 days


#3 posted 03-22-2011 01:40 AM

I am dangerous when I go to a lumber yard without a plan or list…often turns into an expensive trip
Same for browsing in a tool/hardware store

-- Scott "Some days you are the big dog, some days you are the fire hydrant"

View JJohnston's profile (online now)

JJohnston

1587 posts in 2013 days


#4 posted 03-22-2011 02:04 AM

This is a two-edged sword: since you don’t know what’s going to be available week to week, you’ll have to buy whatever strikes your fancy, every time, even if you don’t have immediate plans for it, because you know they won’t have it next time.

-- "Sometimes even now, when I'm feeling lonely and beat, I drift back in time, and I find my feet...Down on Main Street." - Bob Seger

View JoeyG's profile

JoeyG

1259 posts in 1348 days


#5 posted 03-22-2011 03:39 AM

the walnut was just over 8/4×10 x26, the cherry was 4/4×6x 35, and the curly maple was 6/4×2.5×62 inchs. The maple wasn’t really a short, but he gave me the discount anyway. I told him I wanted a piece but he only had whole boards which I couldn’t carry in my wife’s car. He look around the mill and found that piece in the corner. I am usually really good about what I spend. I also try to be very careful of waste. I don’t have a lathe yet, so turning is out. for now. I hope to pick one up by the end of the year. I have to complete a couple more jobs around the house for my wife before I tell her how much I really need one. It keeps me from blowing a months pay each trip to Woodcraft.

-- JoeyG ~~~ http://www.facebook.com/JHGWoodWorks

View William's profile

William

9221 posts in 1564 days


#6 posted 03-22-2011 10:17 AM

Can I make a suggestion here?
You state that you want to be careful not to create waste. Knowing that, I would suggest another tools before the lathe. I suggest a real good band saw capable of resawing, if you don’t already have one. With boards in the thicknesses you mentioned, I’m afraid most of my waste would be what comes out the end of the planer trying to get them down to a the thickness I need. If I had a better band saw, I could cut my waste in half, if not more.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View JoeyG's profile

JoeyG

1259 posts in 1348 days


#7 posted 03-22-2011 01:47 PM

A band saw is on my wish list and I go between wanting it and the lathe first. I can do most things the band saw can with others tools, just not as easily. The lathe on the other had I cannot. The catch is that I have never used a lathe, so I am not sure I will even like it. I am pretty sure I will, but I have been wrong about that before. I hope to find someone in my area who has one and will let me get a little hands on time. It would really suck to spend the money on one and find I hate it. So as you can see I bounce between which one I would like to get first. Which ever it is I look forward to having them both in my shop at some point.

-- JoeyG ~~~ http://www.facebook.com/JHGWoodWorks

View William's profile

William

9221 posts in 1564 days


#8 posted 03-23-2011 12:14 AM

I really wish you would tell me how to resaw wood without a decent band saw. I would try anything. Currently, I am running one inch material through a planer over and over again untill I get it down to the quarter inch I need (just one prime example). Doing this wastes material (can’t do much with all those planer shaving on the floor) and wastes the life of my planer blades (go through them rather quickly planing like this with oak and mahogany).
If I had a good enough band saw, even if I wasn’t that great at first with resawing, I’m sure I could at least get two quarter inch boards out of the single one inch board. Instead, currently, if I need two of the same size quarter inch board, I go through the above process with two one inch boards. That double the wasted material and blade life.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View JoeyG's profile

JoeyG

1259 posts in 1348 days


#9 posted 03-23-2011 12:40 AM

I do it two different ways depending mainly on the width of the board I am splitting. If it is a wide board I use a hand saw. Labor intensive, but the safest way I have found to do it without a band saw. If they are narrow say 2-3 inches I use my table saw.

-- JoeyG ~~~ http://www.facebook.com/JHGWoodWorks

View William's profile

William

9221 posts in 1564 days


#10 posted 03-23-2011 12:50 AM

Ok, I just wanted to throw the suggestion out there. To me, a good band saw is better than a lathe. I have both now. You stated yourself a very good reason for the order of buying that I suggest though. I’m sure you’ll use a band saw. I know it. Even if you don’t see the need now, after having one, you’ll wonder how you lived without it. The one I have now isn’t good enough for resawing, but I still wonder how I done wood work before having it. The lathe on the other hand, is a different story. You will either love it, hate it, or like me, love it but just seldom use it.
I wish I could do more hand sawing as well has hand planes. The poor state of my back doesn’t allow it to be though. If you can saw wide board with a hand saw, please, have appreciation for your health. It’s not guaranteed forever. As for the table saw, I have done that. After having two pieces now though split and throw sharp chunks of wood at me, I no longer vare to even try it. Yes I use safety equipment. The last time this happen, the saw broke off a piece of wood about a foot long with enough force that it through the safety guard up in the air and the piece of wood straight back after deflecting off of said guard, and into my stomach. I was lucky it didn’t do more damage than it did. It left a nasty buise though and I’m sure there was internal bruising as well, because I couldn’t eat without vomiting for a week.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View JoeyG's profile

JoeyG

1259 posts in 1348 days


#11 posted 03-23-2011 02:19 AM

I have to agree with you that it is very dangerous to use a table saw. I use every precaution possible but it can get scary when a board decides to bind. I had a piece kick back once and catch me just under the rib cage. And that was just ripping a board normally. I will most likely get a band saw first. Mainly to make things easier and safer. I also would like to give those band saw boxes a try. They look like they can be a challenge. My main issue is that I have my shop (Which I hope to post some pics of soon) in a 1 car garage and space is very limited. I have most everything on wheels so I can move it around as I need it. A band saw big enough to re-saw just might be out of my budget and space range.

You can always use the planer chips for mulch. I put all of mine around my kids swing set. I find it softer for them than regular mulch. I do try to keep the exotic woods, like winge, out of it.

-- JoeyG ~~~ http://www.facebook.com/JHGWoodWorks

View JoeyG's profile

JoeyG

1259 posts in 1348 days


#12 posted 03-23-2011 02:27 AM

William, I just looked through your gallery. beautiful work. Scroll saw work is another of those things that I would like to give a try. I built cabinets for so long to pay the bills, that now that I can do woodworking for my enjoyment, I want to try it all.

-- JoeyG ~~~ http://www.facebook.com/JHGWoodWorks

View William's profile

William

9221 posts in 1564 days


#13 posted 03-23-2011 03:29 AM

I find scroll saw work very enjoyable. It is not something you want to do though unless you have plenty of patience. I suggest buying a cheap scroll saw when you get ready to start to see if you like it or not. You can pick up an entry level saw for under a hundred bucks. My first saw was a Ryobi. While I don’t recommend that saw to anyone, it just goes to show that you can start with what you can afford. I now use a Delta SS250, which is also considered by most to be an entry level saw. I can’t afford a higher priced saw though.
As for the chips from the planer, you made the suggestion of using it for mulch. One can only find use for so much mulch. I create a lot of planer chips. Another use for it I found is for my fishing. If you put down about a three inch layer of it and keep it wet on dark soil, worms will bed under it. Give these a few weeks and you have some good fish bait. Still though, if I could afford a better band saw, I’d love to get more woodworking use out of my existing lumber than using it for mulch and worm beds.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View JoeyG's profile

JoeyG

1259 posts in 1348 days


#14 posted 03-23-2011 03:54 AM

hahaha I am sure you would. That is a great idea for the fishing bait. I love to fish. Have you tried craigslist? I have found several good deals for tools on there. You just have to be careful and make sure you try out the equipment first. I know that I have seen several good priced saws in my area, I just haven’t had the finances to even go look at them.

-- JoeyG ~~~ http://www.facebook.com/JHGWoodWorks

View William's profile

William

9221 posts in 1564 days


#15 posted 03-23-2011 04:11 AM

Finances has been my problem. I’ve barely been able to consistantly finance my project, much less buy any major tools for some time now. I seen a Rockwell band saw on Craiglist just last week that would have worked perfectly for my needs. The problem is it cost $350. Right now, that might as well be a million bucks, because I could come up with the mil just as easily as I could come up with the three fifty, if you get my point.
But back to your original post. From the description of the wood you gave, small boxes such as jewelry boxes seem like a good start. I was going to suggest if you had a scroll saw, resawing it into thinner stock to extend what you have and do some scroll work project, but you’ve answered both questions (if you had a band saw or scroll saw) already.
If you just want to have fun, here is a good idea for you. You could dress it up real nice since you have several different species of woods.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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