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My lathe journeys. #30: .. "Hey buddy. How do I get to Carnagie Hall?"

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Blog entry by JoeinGa posted 06-15-2015 10:01 PM 977 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 29: .. First thing I turned with the new lathe. Part 30 of My lathe journeys. series Part 31: ... More practicing, more bowls. »

... “Practice, practice, practice!”

Yup, and that’s the same answer for “How do I get better on the lathe?” :-)

So I been doing a lot of practicing on my new lathe. I’m really digging this bad boy, and what a DIFFERENCE from that old POS I was using! I can readily see why someone would get discouraged who was just starting out on one of those. So here’s some of what I’ve been doing… in no particular order
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I’ll put a few more on another post. Too many pictures makes it difficult to load for some folks with slow Internet speeds . And as usual, Thanks for looking. Comments and critiques welcomed.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward



9 comments so far

View Todd Swartwood's profile

Todd Swartwood

257 posts in 1188 days


#1 posted 06-15-2015 10:35 PM

Looks great Joe, I guess whoever said practice make perfect was right.
Keep up the good work.
Have a blessed evening and fun making those shavings, Todd

-- Todd Swartwood (Todd Swart-Woodworks)

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

5223 posts in 1506 days


#2 posted 06-15-2015 11:44 PM

I guess yo can say the new lathe has improved the final results but I can see you are improving also. A lot of cool stuff for just playing around. Keep it up Joe.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View Chris's profile

Chris

331 posts in 3549 days


#3 posted 06-16-2015 05:59 AM

Wowsers! Great work Joe! Those pieces are beautiful. I like the little coin tray with the bark still intact. That one is a natural beauty. You are there Joe.

-- Chris Harrell - custom callmaker "Quacky Calls" Eastern NC. http://www.quackycalls.com

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7481 posts in 1470 days


#4 posted 06-16-2015 01:31 PM

Thanks guys. I’m getting better but still have a lot to learn. As I watch videos I’m seeing that I’m using some of the tools in ways they’re not supposed to be used (and held)

One guys video says “Use any tool you have that gets the job done” and so far that philosophy is working for me. I doubt I’ll ever be able to afford to go to one of those turning classes, so for now You-tube and me are good buddies :-)

Chris, that last one posted (with the bark) is pecan. The log was split big time and you can see where I used sawdust and superglue to fill that pie-shaped void. Worked out pretty well. I’ve done that to save a few bowls

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 639 days


#5 posted 06-16-2015 02:40 PM

Good looking turnings.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View Chris's profile

Chris

331 posts in 3549 days


#6 posted 06-16-2015 06:03 PM

Daggone Joe. I do see that now. I missed that detail earlier. That was ‘one heck of a crack’ to fill wasn’t it? Whatever you did, worked out really nice. I would not have thought the crazy glue would have filled such a gap without presenting issues such as breaking to brittleness issues- the mere volume of glue needed. I guess all of that sawdust prevents that.

-- Chris Harrell - custom callmaker "Quacky Calls" Eastern NC. http://www.quackycalls.com

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7481 posts in 1470 days


#7 posted 06-16-2015 07:12 PM

I build it up a bit at a time. I form a bit of sawdust squeezing it into place with my fingers and then drip superglue on it till it absorbs. Allow a few hours drying time and keep repeating till done. It DOES get rock hard and is a bear to sand so I try to get the final bits as close to smooth as I can. Here’s some pix of another one I fixed that way.
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-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Chris's profile

Chris

331 posts in 3549 days


#8 posted 06-16-2015 09:27 PM

OH ok! Neato. Thanks so much for sharing that detail. I’ve used this method with epoxy from time to time and even super glue on many occasions, with great success. Those were much smaller cracks and voids however and never nothing quite as expansive as that. I just never thought about filling such a large gap in this manner.

Very neat and excellent help. Thank you.

You have lived up to your footnote today Joe, LOL!! You performed a random act of kindness by sharing this with me. Way to pay it forward.

-- Chris Harrell - custom callmaker "Quacky Calls" Eastern NC. http://www.quackycalls.com

View Mark Wilson's profile

Mark Wilson

1751 posts in 526 days


#9 posted 07-29-2015 08:17 AM

”... old POS I was using…” Never insult the old woman who taught you your ABCs, Joe. Such excellent work. Such an excellent ethos. You’re good to know, Joe. And, back to that old woman: My lathe is a 1956 Shopsmith Mk5. When I got her, four years ago or so, she had a speed problem. She was the first wood lathe I’d ever been near, though I had run machine lathes in High School. She had a problem that I didn’t even know was a problem. It seems that she couldn’t run much slower than almost full-speed. Weeeel, after almost getting my arm busted

by an exploding inside-out turning (my first), I began thinking that, mebees I ought to find out about slowing this puppy down. So I called Battell’s, a hardware store that’s been in operation in my town since 1946, and found out that the mechanic (who had rebuilt this machine in 1998, according to the documentation I got when I bought her) is a Shopsmiith aficionado, though not a woodworker – he’s a machine mechanic – named Vincent. I hadn’t had this machine opened up since I got her. Vince walked me though getting the Speed Quadrant out, over the phone, after which I took it to him. He straightened it out, charged me about $25, explained the nuances of the machine to me, and sent me on my merry way. Now, I know the old woman well enough that I can at least diagnose, if not repair, almost anything that comes up. I would like to have a swiveling headstock, telescoping tailstock, flat, easier-to-attach-things-to bed, computerized speed control, quick-release thingies on all the moving parts , lathe. But, til I can afford that, I’m getting comfy with the old woman. (Shopsmith has an up-grade package that runs about $2000, and a brand-new Mk7 runs about $4000. Donations gratefully accepted, he said in jest. (Or was it?) This was what came of my experience:

So, in short (too late for that), we learn a lot from our PsOS, don’t we?

-- Mark

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