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My lathe journeys. #28: ... made new carbide tools, now with handles :-)

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Blog entry by JoeinGa posted 04-07-2015 03:49 PM 1780 reads 1 time favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 27: ... Get served lemons? Make lemonade! Part 28 of My lathe journeys. series Part 29: .. First thing I turned with the new lathe. »

A few weeks ago I posted that I had ordered some carbide cutters from Capt. Eddie and made a cutter bar using 5/8” aluminum barstock. For the grips, I used some sports wrap that I found At Wally World.
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The tool does what it’s supposed to, enough to see that I did like using the carbide cutters. So I decided to make a couple new ones and this time I made wood handles. These pieces of walnut and mahogany came from an old entertainment center I broke down. The pieces were already glued up and I drew a rough circle in one end to see that the size was pretty perfect for what I wanted to do.
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I originally cut the piece in half, but unfortunately back when the unit was originally made, they must have had a knot that fell out and they glued a piece of white-wood dowel in it as a filler piece. So I started shaving the end bit-by-bit till that dowel was gone. As you can see, that made one of the handles shorter than the other. Oh well, I can make do with that.
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Now my HF clone lathe isn’t the best piece of machinery in the world, but until I can save up for a better lathe it’s what I have while I’m going thru this learning process. One of the issues I have is that the tailstock will NOT line up perfectly with the headstock, no matter what I do to adjust it. Every time I’ve tried to turn any kind of spindle, it’s always been off balance. But I mounted the wood up and decided to just do the best I can with what I have.
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Setting the handles aside for the moment, I turned my attention to the barstock. Once I had the basic shape for the cutters to fit, I decided that I’d grind about 5” of the end and drill the handles to accept it. Using a piece of scrap I first drilled a 3/4” hole thinking I’d somehow glue the tool into the handle. But there was way too much play in the hole. So I ground the handles down till it would fit in a 11/16” hole. When I inserted the tool into that hole I could see there would be a lot of the round hole showing around the tool. So I ground the handle some more and found that with a 5/8” hole, the square shank would pretty much cover the hole.
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I decided to add maple ends to the handles so I cut some round blanks using the drill press and a hole saw. Glued one to the end and clamped it to dry.
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I didn’t take a pic, but I drilled the end out of the handle with a spade bit on the drill press. I know I’m going to hear from all you “Safety Experts” but I’ll tell you anyway… I had to hold the handle with my HAND while I drilled it out because I couldn’t come up with a better way! The process went fine, there was no blood shed :-)

Next it was time to assemble the handles to the barstock. I mixed up about 1/2 a tube of JB Weld and scooped it into a big plastic syringe I used to use for oil. Using the syringe meant that I wouldn’t get so much as a smudge on that maple end by trying to force the JB Weld into that small hole on the handle. It worked like a charm and I used a Jorgy to clamp it overnight.
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And after several coats of Danish oil and about 5 coats of rattle-can lacquer … here’s the finished tools.
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Now that these are done, I have some planks of maple and oak clamped up so I can try them out. Once again, Thanks for following along.
Comments and critiques are always welcomed
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-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward



11 comments so far

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7935 posts in 1848 days


#1 posted 04-07-2015 06:10 PM

Wow, great looking handles.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

5252 posts in 1511 days


#2 posted 04-08-2015 02:14 AM

Super job on the handles Joe. The maple ends compliment the rest of the handle nicely. Glad to see you making wood handles for them. I purchased a turning tool awhile ago that had a rubber type wrapping on it similar to what you had done. It felt great and handled well but after a year or so I went ahead and made a new wood handle to match the rest.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7489 posts in 1475 days


#3 posted 04-08-2015 12:10 PM

Thanks Rick and Dave. Soon as I get these blanks glued up I’ll be able to try the new tools out.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

1771 posts in 1116 days


#4 posted 05-17-2015 01:36 AM

Absolutely Beyooteeful!

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://geraldlhunsucker.com/

View mounttod's profile

mounttod

30 posts in 439 days


#5 posted 06-06-2016 01:27 PM

Any concerns with the tapped threads stripping out in aluminum?

View Lazyman's profile (online now)

Lazyman

706 posts in 855 days


#6 posted 10-20-2016 03:33 PM

Hey Joe. I’ve been eyeing your DIY carbide tools since you posted this last year. What I would really like is one for a diamond carbide blade. Have you or anyone else following this thread thought about the best way to cut/grind the end to hold a diamond tip or better yet has anyone made one that they can share their technique?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7489 posts in 1475 days


#7 posted 10-20-2016 04:51 PM

Nathan, First off thanks for the nice comment. As to the diamond tips, I’ve never used them so I’m shooting from the hip here. But I think that so long as they have a hole in the middle like the carbide tips do, you should be able to mount them the same way. And by making a notch in the end of the tool bar would keep them from turning on the tool.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7935 posts in 1848 days


#8 posted 10-20-2016 05:10 PM


Hey Joe. I ve been eyeing your DIY carbide tools since you posted this last year. What I would really like is one for a diamond carbide blade. Have you or anyone else following this thread thought about the best way to cut/grind the end to hold a diamond tip or better yet has anyone made one that they can share their technique?

- Lazyman

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/89298
Click for details

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Timeout's profile

Timeout

2 posts in 51 days


#9 posted 10-20-2016 07:20 PM

Rick.M, I am in the process of making the set of 3, using 12mm sq 316 stainless bar stock. not the easiest stuff to manipulate and a month of sundays using wet and dry to take out scuff and file marks. The diamond one I will do similar to this but drill a hole at the back of the tip ledge to lock in the back end to prevent movement. pic attached is round one. I will post a photo when done to show you.

View Timeout's profile

Timeout

2 posts in 51 days


#10 posted 10-20-2016 07:23 PM

Joe, great handles by the way!!. Is the aluminium bar stock hard enough for this job? I was advised to go something harder. and I didn’t want the shaft to tarnish so went stainless instead.

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7935 posts in 1848 days


#11 posted 10-20-2016 08:36 PM


The diamond one I will do similar to this but drill a hole at the back of the tip ledge to lock in the back end to prevent movement.
- Timeout

I didn’t bother on mine and it doesn’t budge.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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