LumberJocks

Tools #2: Performax Dust Shroud replacement

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Jim Brown posted 06-27-2010 06:25 PM 2511 reads 2 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: I received a Harbor Freight catalog! Part 2 of Tools series no next part

First things first: I’m writing about something I did … I’m not saying you should do it. Use your own judgment and common sense! Read your manuals. If something seems dangerous, don’t do it. I’m no expert … not by a long shot, so don’t trust me over what your granddad told you or over what the little voice in your head tells you about keeping track of your digits and limbs. I welcome all supportive advice, feedback, and questions.

Recently I bought a used Performax 22-44 drum sander via Craigslist for $350. On the plus side, it came with a box of assorted sandpaper rolls; on the downside, the drive belt was shot all to heck (you need to keep an eye on how those belts track … and incidentally, before you shell out for a replacement, you might want to give Industrial Abrasives a call. They make belts to order at very competitive prices … as in less than half of the price other folks were quoting me. I’m not affiliated, just a very satisfied customer based on that one purchase).

Another downside was the condition of the dust shroud:

Stock Shroud

As you can see, it’s set up for a 2.5” Shop Vac hose rather than a 4” dust collection hose, and as the next picture reveals, it’s been rather chewed up:

Stock Shroud closeup

I don’t see a 2.5” hose doing the job. Furthermore, I would imagine that the weight of the hose could have forced the plastic shroud into the sandpaper, which would make very short work of it. My new shroud helps with this, but I still prefer to suspend the hose from the ceiling. I would consider replacing it with plastic pipe to reduce resistance, but honestly, it does fine with the wavy hose, and I prefer to be able to wheel the sander out of the way when necessary. It’s got a pretty big footprint!

My first attempt at an improved shroud was to hack up a 6” PVC drain pipe fitting, one that had a 4” T coming out of the middle of it. I couldn’t make it work to my satisfaction as it was not pliable without heat, and working in the basement of my house with a torch and PVC seemed like a lousy idea. So I went to the hardware store and picked up a heavy gauge piece of snap-together metal duct, not the flimsy dryer stuff.

First I cut it to length with some snips and filed the cut edge smooth. Then I opened it up gently. Then I clamped it to the edge of a workbench with an inch or so left hanging over the edge, and a piece of scrap wood running above it even with the edge of the bench. With the palms of my hands I bend the edge outward, and then repeated on other side, to give the thing a kind of omega profile. If I had a sheet metal brake we wouldn’t be having this conversation!

Shroud profile

The next step was to add dust collection. For that I used a PVC 45 degree elbow, placed just as the port was on the original. I used the sander itself to shape the edge of the elbow to approximate the contour of the shroud. I don’t imagine those fumes were very good for me, but I had a fan running.

Shroud with elbow

I marked out my cut with a Sharpie, and then I got to work with a drill and some snips and made a hole in the shroud, leaving tabs to rivet to the elbow. My work here is pretty sloppy, but it’s effective. I know some of you would have bondo-ed the gaps and rivets and probably transferred the decals from the original to the new one, but my shop’s a shop, not a tool museum! I could have used some longer rivets, though, since they didn’t all bite. There’s probably a better way to do this, but hey, it worked. I’ll do better next time, if there’s a next time, which is unlikely.

Inside shroud

So that’s the shroud. The original just lays on these metal ears, but with the weight of the 4” hose, I didn’t see how that was going to work securely. Therefore I got out my trusty Harbor Freight taps and made holes for wing screws. I ended up dropping the whole assembly down and doing this off the tool since I couldn’t get a straight shot at the tabs. If your drill and tap handles allow it, just do it on the machine (though I have to say reassembly wasn’t very hard).

Tapped tab and wing screws

The wing screws pictured are longer than they need to be, and by rights they need two nuts on each to serve as stops, since you really don’t want to screw down so far that you’re interfering with the movement of the drum. Once I had the holes drilled and tapped, I drilled matching holes in my homemade shroud. After that I was pretty much ready to go.

A few notes: I was fortunate in that I had the original shroud to work from. My new one sits so that it’s a little higher than the rollers on each side of the drum … in other words, it does not ride directly on the work (though I think it could do so without harm). I considered adding some plastic or rubber hose, sliced lengthwise, over the edges of the shroud, but as I keep my hands well clear of this thing in operation, the current setup feels safe enough to me as is, and black rubber might scuff up the work. With the right tools you could seam the edges, but as I said, I don’t think its urgent.

I hope this helps somebody. I love this machine! I’m building a kitchen full of cabinets out of maple right now, and I just ran a whole stack of face frame parts on edge through the thing to take off some burn marks. A couple of passes did the trick. I might even end up running the face frames through it if they need leveling … and the raised panel doors … and …



8 comments so far

View TheOldTimer's profile

TheOldTimer

223 posts in 1771 days


#1 posted 06-27-2010 08:22 PM

Hi Jim:

I have had the 16-32 for about 5 years and use it all the time in the shop. When it came time to replace my drive belt, I replaced it with a rubber after market drive belt with no seams, I have had it on the sander for the past 3 years and it has not shown any sign of wear or cracking. Living in the desert south west where summer temperatures are 110 to 115 the abrasive belts do not hold up. They seporate at the glue line and simply fall apart. As you previously stated, you need to keep an eye on the tracking of the drive belt or it will catch on the edge and fall apart. This has not been a problem for me since I replaced the belt with the existing neopreme drive belt.
I buy all my abrasive belts from Industrial Abrasives in bulk rools and cut them with a pair of tin snips. They are a excillent company to do business with. I only buy and use 80,100 & 150 grit belts. I do all my finish sanding with a ROS sander.
Goood article and great photos.

-- TheOldTimer,Chandler Arizona

View Jim Brown's profile

Jim Brown

28 posts in 2453 days


#2 posted 06-28-2010 01:56 AM

Interesting. I have two of the 120 grit drive belts from IA, so I won’t be in the market for a while, and I won’t have the environmental issues since my shop is in my basement. Does the neoprene become less effective (sticky) when it gets dusty?

View TheOldTimer's profile

TheOldTimer

223 posts in 1771 days


#3 posted 06-28-2010 08:34 PM

Jim:

Not at all, I found that it moves stock better then the abrasive drive belt. It is ribbed ( rough surface) and I ocasionally use a damp cloth to clean it. In the fall I am going to order another as a spare.

-- TheOldTimer,Chandler Arizona

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112289 posts in 2262 days


#4 posted 06-28-2010 08:40 PM

My first thought when looking at the damage on the original shroud was to fix it with some Fiberglas.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Jim Brown's profile

Jim Brown

28 posts in 2453 days


#5 posted 06-28-2010 08:57 PM

TheOldTimer: Where did you get the neoprene belt?

Jim: That would have worked, but it wouldn’t have addressed the way it sits loose on those ears … meaning future damage would have been likely as the weight of the DC hose might shift the shroud itself. I also think the 4” DC is a lot more effective in picking up the sanding dust.

View spaids's profile

spaids

699 posts in 2378 days


#6 posted 09-17-2010 06:47 PM

ok this is not a cool as Jims BUT it works AWESOME! Thanks a ton for the idea Jim. I don’t get a spec of dust in the air when using my drum sander.

-- Wipe the blood stains from your blade before coming in.--

View spaids's profile

spaids

699 posts in 2378 days


#7 posted 09-17-2010 06:59 PM

Hey Jim did you unit come with the little secondary roller in also or is that an add on? Min doesn’t have that and I have noticed that if I run a short piece through this thing it can lift it as the piece exits and cause a sort of snipe. If I get around quick enough I can just push down on the piece gently and it prevents that from happening. I imagine that’s what your secondary roller accomplishes?

-- Wipe the blood stains from your blade before coming in.--

View Jim Brown's profile

Jim Brown

28 posts in 2453 days


#8 posted 09-17-2010 07:22 PM

That looks a lot more professional than mine! Great job. The dust collection makes a biiiiiiig difference, doesn’t it?

As far as the rollers go, my sander does have them in front of and behind the drum … I assumed they were original. They do maintain a fair amount of tension, though they wouldn’t keep a longer workpiece from tipping off balance if it were unsupported. Whether they are original nor not, I can’t say, as I am at least the 3rd owner of the machine.

I also notice that yours is sitting on a table—particle board?—that mine doesn’t have. Interesting …

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase