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Butcher Block Kitchen Table #12: Nearing completion of the top (finally...)

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Blog entry by Jimi_C posted 10-25-2010 07:30 AM 9824 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 11: The Actual "Butcher Block" part of the table... Part 12 of Butcher Block Kitchen Table series no next part

When we last left off, I had milled all the pieces for the top. Not long after that, I had glued them up in groups of 5-6 pieces each, and had run those through the planer to make them all a consistent thickness (just under 1”, maybe 15/16”). Due to a lot of personal stuff going on, I didn’t have a lot of shop time for the next month or so, but I’ve finally gotten some time back and have made more progress.

Earlier this week, I glued up the smaller sections into two halves, but in order to maximize the thickness I decided to flatten each half with my hand plane – my #4 to be exact, so more smoothing than flattening. This has worked out really well, considering it’s the first time I’ve tried it. Yesterday I glued up the halves and finished flattening it as best I could.

Sorry for the low quality pics, our good camera is on loan to a friend on vacation, so all I’ve got is my phone.

The top is pretty flat, though I probably could have done better had I used my #8 instead (it still needs work to be tuned up, possibly a new blade since the original has some major pitting). I’ve currently got it sanded on both sides with 100 grit, though I had to sand a few spots extra since there was some tear-out on the curly maple sections, so I need to go over it again to knock down some high spots before moving up to 150. Overall though, hopefully I’ll be ready to trim it to length within a week.

As always, thanks for looking.

-- The difference between being defeated and admitting defeat is what makes all the difference in the world - Upton Sinclair, "The Jungle"



6 comments so far

View dub560's profile

dub560

615 posts in 2373 days


#1 posted 10-25-2010 04:43 PM

looking great my friend

-- Life is enjoyable especially when you borrow from people

View Jimi_C's profile

Jimi_C

507 posts in 2695 days


#2 posted 04-16-2011 05:26 PM

The breadboard ends are working great – I’ve actually been considering doing a follow-up to show the expansion/contraction of the shelf. It’s pretty cool, since it’s been so dry this winter the shelf is actually contracted in about 1/8” on each side from the breadboard ends – so it’s doing its job. I haven’t noticed any expansion in the top, but I’m sure it’s there to a degree (the pieces were thinner and turned on edge, so it should be expanding less side to side as opposed to up and down a bit).

Different woods will contract and expand differently, and there are calculators online that will give you an estimate based on current humidity and the dryness of your lumber. The lumber I used for the bottom shelf was also plain-sawn, whereas using quarter-sawn or rift-sawn wood would have lessened the movement.

-- The difference between being defeated and admitting defeat is what makes all the difference in the world - Upton Sinclair, "The Jungle"

View jmack77's profile

jmack77

31 posts in 2533 days


#3 posted 03-13-2012 02:56 PM

How did the table turn out?

View Jimi_C's profile

Jimi_C

507 posts in 2695 days


#4 posted 03-14-2012 12:45 AM

It turned out well, I posted it in the project section. Going on 1.5 years later it’s still holding up very well.Had a party a few months ago where someone set something on it and caused a water ring, but the high moisture didn’t split the top :)

-- The difference between being defeated and admitting defeat is what makes all the difference in the world - Upton Sinclair, "The Jungle"

View jmack77's profile

jmack77

31 posts in 2533 days


#5 posted 03-14-2012 01:14 PM

Just saw the pics of it. It looks really nice. My wife just added one to her “wish list” so I was looking around for some ideas.

View Jimi_C's profile

Jimi_C

507 posts in 2695 days


#6 posted 03-14-2012 01:37 PM

If I did it over again, I’d have made the top thicker (2” vs 1” currently), I just totally underestimated how much material I’d need since this was really the first thing I’d ever built. The main “gotcha” was simply the material loss from the saw blade kerf – 1/8” compounded over 24+ cuts added up. Thats what stopped me from making it end-grain, which was the original intention if you go back through the blog posts.

-- The difference between being defeated and admitting defeat is what makes all the difference in the world - Upton Sinclair, "The Jungle"

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