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Building the Infill Shooting Plane #6: Mouth to Mouth

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Blog entry by JayT posted 07-25-2016 01:04 AM 1210 reads 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 5: Start some Body Shaping Part 6 of Building the Infill Shooting Plane series Part 7: Time to Tap »

With the body rabbeted out to accept the side plate, it’s time to cut the actual mouth.

If you haven’t yet, now would be a good time to cut the metal pieces to final length. Since the O1 hasn’t been hardened, it cuts pretty easily. I did the first two planes with just a hacksaw. For this one, I used a hacksaw on the 3/8 and a jigsaw on the 1/8.

Lay the piece of 1/8 steel on the bench and the wood blank on top and tightly nestled in the rabbet. I hope your wood blank is still a bit overlong. If so, let the wood overhang the steel just a bit on the front. Add the 3/8 steel standing up tight against the wood blank and use a sharpie or similar to mark out the mouth opening.

Pull the steel and you should have marks ending 3/8 of an inch from one edge of the plate and extending to nearly the other edge. With a combo square or other 45 degree tool, mark the opening on this edge as well.

Using your metal cutting tool, cut out the mouth. I used the jigsaw again and am much happier with the results than the first two planes that were done with a hacksaw. It worked fine, but the cuts were very rough and required a lot of filing to clean them up. The cleaner the cut, the less cleanup will be needed later, but always better to leave some of the line and sneak up on a good fit later than to over cut and have to scramble.

Set the wood body back on the steel and check your fit.

Now is also a good time to double check the body thickness and make any adjustments.

Once you are satisfied with the fit, the frog can be attached. If you still have the screws from disassembling the transitional plane, those should work great. If not, round head wood screws can be purchased and used.

Next installment: Tap, tap, tap away.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."



12 comments so far

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ki7hy

493 posts in 202 days


#1 posted 07-25-2016 04:46 AM

Thanks Jay.

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ki7hy

493 posts in 202 days


#2 posted 07-25-2016 05:34 AM

If my mouth is a little wider than I would like it to be, is it best to cut the steel flush with the frog side enough for the blade to fit through and have extra steel showing on the chip collection side or should they just be cut to the hole regardless? I’m thinking the smallest cut in that metal the better for thin shavings unless I’m not thinking it through?

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JayT

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#3 posted 07-25-2016 01:12 PM

You can do either way. The very first one I built as a prototype has a wide open mouth with steel flush to the wood. The second one that was sent to Terry also had the mouth too wide, so I just let the extra steel show. You can see it in this pic:

In the end, it really doesn’t matter for use on end grain, which is the primary purpose of a shooting plane. A tight mouth on a smoother helps to hold the wood fiber down as it is being cut to prevent tear out. On end grain, however, since you are severing the end of the fibers, if the mouth is wider than a single wood fiber, it’s not really providing any support to what is being cut. My shooting plane with a wide mouth still performs very well.

Go with what looks better to your eye. Personally, of the two, I like look of the exposed steel on Terry’s plane better than the wide gap on mine, but either one will work just fine.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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ki7hy

493 posts in 202 days


#4 posted 07-25-2016 09:54 PM

Thanks for clearing that up Jay.

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duckmilk

1666 posts in 788 days


#5 posted 07-27-2016 03:34 PM

Jay, in the previous installment, you talked of getting the body the correct thickness.

1) How much leeway/tolerance is there? It seems to me like 1/16” would probably not make that much difference, but wanted to get your input.

2) Are there any aspects of the different transitional plane makers that would affect the thickness of the blank you start with? Ie: when the frog is removed from the metal base and put on the wood blank, are there any special considerations from one brand to another?

-- "Duck and Bob would be out doin some farming with funny hats on." chrisstef

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JayT

4778 posts in 1674 days


#6 posted 07-27-2016 04:41 PM



Jay, in the previous installment, you talked of getting the body the correct thickness.

1) How much leeway/tolerance is there? It seems to me like 1/16” would probably not make that much difference, but wanted to get your input.

There’s actually quite a bit of leeway. As long as you can retract the iron fully and extend it to cut, then you’ll be good. Since it’s a shooting plane, you’ll never be taking a heavy cut and so shouldn’t ever need to have the iron extend very far. If that 1/16 is the difference between the iron being able to extend out the mouth or not, then it’s important. Otherwise, not so much. The point of the 1/16 is that if you need to take off more than that to get the right thickness, I’d probably remove it from the top. If too much stock is removed from the bottom, you end up with the dilemma I had on the first two planes and that ki7hy is experiencing.

Because of how the body is shaped and lack of a tote, my goal is to end up with as thick of a blank as possible. This will make it far more comfortable to use later on.

2) Are there any aspects of the different transitional plane makers that would affect the thickness of the blank you start with? Ie: when the frog is removed from the metal base and put on the wood blank, are there any special considerations from one brand to another?

- duckmilk

I don’t know. From what I’ve run across, the transitional bodies and frame thickness are pretty similar from the different brands. On the ones done so far, there’s been more to deal with regarding the variation of the cap iron and adjuster (how much backlash and how worn they are) and that can vary plane to plane more than manufacturer to manufacturer. What I’d love to find is a Union X series tranny where the body is trashed. That mechanism might be perfect for this use.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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duckmilk

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#7 posted 07-30-2016 05:23 PM

Ahemmm….tap, tap, tap…

Actually, I have another question. What did you use to cut the mouth opening to give such a mice 45 deg. bevel and follow the skew?

-- "Duck and Bob would be out doin some farming with funny hats on." chrisstef

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JayT

4778 posts in 1674 days


#8 posted 07-30-2016 08:08 PM

Duck, are you tapping your webbed foot at me? :^)

Should have the next installments of the blog up tonight. Had very little shop time last weekend and none at all during the week. Finally got back to working on it today.

The mouth was cut in Part 3 of the blog. Started with a sliding compound miter saw and finished with a handsaw and chisels.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View ki7hy's profile

ki7hy

493 posts in 202 days


#9 posted 07-30-2016 09:31 PM

Duck, I don’t have a compound miter saw, just a regular one. I started the cut with the miter saw since the angles are a little wacky with a thick blank then finished with a tenon saw. Honestly that was all I could do but not the best. My kerf was different so it made the walls pretty wavy. So I chiseled my wall dead flat that holds the frog. The other side is ok, could use more for beautification but it would work fine as is. I’m using wenge and paudok so it’s definitely splintery and tough. Hopefully it turns out well in the final sanding and finish.

Just my thoughts.

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duckmilk

1666 posts in 788 days


#10 posted 07-31-2016 04:24 AM

I was asking about cutting the metal portion of the mouth. How do you get the angles close enough? About all I have is a hacksaw and was wondering.

Next installment: Tap, tap, tap away. And, yes, I was tapping my webbed foot, a little. ;-P

-- "Duck and Bob would be out doin some farming with funny hats on." chrisstef

View ki7hy's profile

ki7hy

493 posts in 202 days


#11 posted 07-31-2016 04:51 AM

I used a jig saw but ended trimming with a file more than anything. It is a little wider it the open end but it should still work fine. It’s not pretty but neither is Jay’s. By pretty I mean sanded to a polish it’s still rough. Could sand It I suppose. Overall you could clamp a block to it and put it in a vice and use the block as a guide to saw straight. Should work ok. Just my thoughts, I’m on the journey right next to you.

View JayT's profile (online now)

JayT

4778 posts in 1674 days


#12 posted 07-31-2016 12:45 PM


I was asking about cutting the metal portion of the mouth. How do you get the angles close enough? About all I have is a hacksaw and was wondering.

- duckmilk

Used a jigsaw this time. The first two were done with a hacksaw. Either way, the mouth will end up needing smoothed down with files &/or a dremel. The ones done with a hacksaw took a lot more time because the cut was rougher, but still ended up OK. You could also try a grinder and cutoff wheel or a cutoff saw. I haven’t used that method, but it should work.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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