LumberJocks

Table Saw Restoration #1: Intro and Cleaning Up the Top

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Jared Tohlen posted 11-15-2016 01:44 PM 840 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Table Saw Restoration series no next part

This is my first post or utterance on this site, so bear with me while I get in the swing of things…

I’ve always wanted to get into woodworking so I can build useful and practical things with my own hands. Within the last few months I’ve come into a host of woodworking tools and machinery, most of which were simply given to me once I expressed interest. These items include: a Delta spindle sander, old craftsman dual disc/belt sander, a vintage Buffalo Tool drill press, a Jet JJ-CS6 jointer, a Japanese tool chest full of hand tools (No. 4, 5, and 7 Stanley hand planes, saws, Narex chisels, and tons more!), and, what this entry is chiefly concerned with, this craftsman table saw.

The catch to just about all of these tools is they need a good chunk of cleaning up and tuning. I’ve done a good bit on the jointer (photos or entry later), and am now on to the table saw. I do this for the fun of restoration, but also to end up with a solid user tool. It’s easy to justify putting the work in as I received the machines for free and just need to show up with some elbow grease and willingness to learn. I should also note that I’m very green when it comes to this sort of thing, restoring tools and machine work. I’m a graphic designer and illustrator spending most of my time on computers, so I’m still traveling a steep learning curve in the land of tools.

I disassembled the saw first.

And have now begun rust removal and resurfacing of the top using sandpaper and steel wool. Thankful for these junky sawhorses I threw together one afternoon—they give me a portable work surface and are pretty dang sturdy.

^ Before

^ After/Midway-ish. Still needing to work down the grits to really smooth out the surface. Also all of the sides and nooks/crannies need attention.)

Any input or direction you folks may have, lay it on me. I want to learn and do this right! Thanks for reading.

-- Jared, Texas, http://jaredtohlen.com



4 comments so far

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4458 posts in 950 days


#1 posted 11-15-2016 02:44 PM

Welcome to the site Jared! You’re well on your way with that top. The only things I would add are to check with a straight edge to make sure the table is fairly flat. Work on the bottom side while you have it on the horses. Make sure the trunion mount threads are in good shape and that the faces where the trunion mounts seat are clean and flat. Finally, make sure the table extension is coplanar with the table.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View jonlruss's profile

jonlruss

116 posts in 925 days


#2 posted 11-15-2016 06:28 PM

Welcome to the site Jared (that’s my son’s name too!). Looks like you’ve got a good start on getting a shop set up. I’ve also got one of those Craftsman saws. I’m still very much a greenhorn myself, but from what I’ve found so far, set up right that saw will do almost anything you ask of it (within it’s limitations of course). Looking forward to seeing your progress.

View Jared Tohlen's profile

Jared Tohlen

2 posts in 387 days


#3 posted 11-15-2016 06:49 PM

Kenny: Thanks for the comment and definitely thanks for the input! I do need to check flatness. If the extension isn’t coplanar, is there a simple work around, or would it boil down to looking for a replacement? Also, looks like I need to read up on my tablesaw lingo and find out what a trunion is ha. Cleaning up the bottom, what is a general idea of “good enough” versus “going overbaord”? I considered enamelling the underside of the main table as well as the body of the saw after I saw someone else here on LJ do the same. Necessary, beneficial, or a touch of crazy?

Jon: Thank you! It’s a good name ha! I’ve definitely fallen in to a good beginning shop. These old Craftsmen saws seem to be much more common than I realized. Glad they are almost always highly regarded, too. And happy to connect with someone else starting out. I actually lurked through your whole series on you tablesaw restoration and cabinet build. It’s looking great!

-- Jared, Texas, http://jaredtohlen.com

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4458 posts in 950 days


#4 posted 11-15-2016 08:13 PM


Kenny: Thanks for the comment and definitely thanks for the input! I do need to check flatness. If the extension isn t coplanar, is there a simple work around, or would it boil down to looking for a replacement?

It doesn’t need to be perfect but, you don’t want it setting higher than your main table. That would cause out-of-square cuts on boards that extend past the main table. Try to get it level or a tad lower than the main table if necessary. The extension should be bolted to the main table so just loosen the bolts a bit to adjust the height.

While you have it apart, I would go ahead and replace the bearings on the arbor shaft. Also make sure your belt pulley isn’t bent and is tight on the shaft. Replace it if it isn’t. Eventually you’ll need bearings. They’re not expensive and it’s much easier to do it now than to have to tear the saw down again later.


Also, looks like I need to read up on my tablesaw lingo and find out what a trunion is ha.

The trunion is the big thing that bolts to the bottom of the table. It includes the blade arbor so it has to be mounted “just right” to hold the blade parallel to the miter slots. If not mounted properly, it can also bind when tilting the blade and throw alignment out when raising/lowering it. You may want to look into PALS which, from what I’ve read, are a big help when you get to fine tuning the trunions. Basically, you just want to be sure all the faces where the trunion assembly meets the bottom of the table are clean and flat.


Cleaning up the bottom, what is a general idea of “good enough” versus “going overbaord”? I considered enamelling the underside of the main table as well as the body of the saw after I saw someone else here on LJ do the same. Necessary, beneficial, or a touch of crazy?

- Jared Tohlen

Enameling the bottom side isn’t going overboard but isn’t necessary either. The main benefit would be corrosion resistance. If you’re going to set up to spray the the housing, may as well do the top too. Just make sure you don’t get paint on any machined surfaces.

Good luck, I’ll be following along!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com