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Building case clock

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Blog entry by JackR posted 01-18-2010 07:14 PM 849 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I’m a beginner and I’m getting started on a pretty simple case clock. The plans call for cutting out a door opening in the front. I basically have to cut a 30” x 6” rectangle out of a 11” x 86” x 3/4 piece of white pine. The plans show one side of the rectangle cut at a 10 degree angle to receive the door. I have a few questions:

1) what’s the best tool to cut out the rectangle? (I only own a table saw and router, but in the process of collecting tools)

2) how do I cut the one side on a 10 degree angle?

Thanks,

Jack



9 comments so far

View lumberdog's profile

lumberdog

238 posts in 2731 days


#1 posted 01-18-2010 07:33 PM

set the blade on your table saw at ten degrees and rip it.

-- Lumberdog.. Morley, Michigan

View David Craig's profile

David Craig

2136 posts in 2573 days


#2 posted 01-18-2010 07:49 PM

Considering the size of the boards, I would invest in a jigsaw for the interior cuts.Bosch makes excellent ones but they are pricey. If you don’t wish to invest in a lot of money, Black and Decker sells decent ones at a more affordable price. After drawing the cut line, drill a holes into the waste area on all four corners for the purpose starting points to set up the jigsaw blade. I would use a straight edge as a guide, clamping it so that the edge of the jigsaw is braced against the edge. You will need to measure the distance between the edge of the plate on the jigsaw to the inside edge of the blade to determine the proper spacing.

As far as the ten degree cut, look for a jigsaw with a beveling shoe. Keep in mind that a ten degree cut is also an 80 degree cut in reverse. So if you cut an 80 degree bevel on the line, when you flip the board over, it should be a 10 degree bevel on that side. Bevel stops are usually at 90 (straight) and 45 so you might also want to get a bevel gauge so that you can measure out the proper degrees and align it with your tool. Some experimentation might be required so make test cuts.

I hope this helps and is excessive information. Since you say you are new, I am not sure how much know-how you have at this point. If I made any errors in suggestion, I would ask the more experienced woodworkers in the community to correct me.

David

-- There is little that is simple when it comes to making a simple box.

View JackR's profile

JackR

6 posts in 2514 days


#3 posted 01-18-2010 07:56 PM

Thanks David.

Sounds like a good suggestion. I good jigsaw is on my list of tools to buy. In the past I’ve experienced ‘drift’ with my CHEAP jigsaw, do the better jigsaws control that better?

View David Craig's profile

David Craig

2136 posts in 2573 days


#4 posted 01-18-2010 08:10 PM

Considering the fact I have a cheap jigsaw, I can’t answer that question :) But I do read reviews and from I hear in regards to the Bosch, it is well loved for its handling. Of course the quality of the jigsaw also depends on the quality of the blade. Cheap blades on expensive tools will decrease its performance and the full reverse is usually true. Great blades on cheaper tools can enhance their performance (within limitations). I think bracing the cut lines with a clamped board would help keep the drift in check.

-- There is little that is simple when it comes to making a simple box.

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1437 posts in 3022 days


#5 posted 01-18-2010 09:34 PM

What about cutting the long sides off the main board first with 10 degree cut, then cutting off the short sides with a straight or 10 degree cut. When you assemble the rails and stiles, they’ll fit perfectly since they were all done in one pass at the same angle and form a frame for the door. You might have to account for the kerf width ahead of time. A 90 degree version of this technique is used to make continuous grain drawers in table aprons, where the apron is assembled from the pieces that were ripped/cross-cut instead of trying to cut out the drawer hole perfectly.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View JackR's profile

JackR

6 posts in 2514 days


#6 posted 01-19-2010 09:40 PM

Picked up a Bosch 1590EVSK last night and finished a practice version of the front cut out for the clock. The Bosch coupled with a straight edge guide and a good blade did the trick! Thanks!

View David Craig's profile

David Craig

2136 posts in 2573 days


#7 posted 01-20-2010 03:01 AM

Not a problem, happy to help. Looking forward to the results. Any project that justifies a good new tool should be lauded :)

-- There is little that is simple when it comes to making a simple box.

View Karson's profile

Karson

35035 posts in 3865 days


#8 posted 01-30-2010 05:28 AM

I was going to suggest a good jigsaw also. I have the Bosch and I’m very happy with it.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

View JackR's profile

JackR

6 posts in 2514 days


#9 posted 10-11-2010 10:07 PM

Another question:

Help!

Same grandfathers clock, many months later (I didn’t touch it all Summer!). The door frame on the bonnet calls for a splined miter joint. I’ve struggled through making some pretty good 45 degree cuts for the door frame pieces, and cut the kerfs for the spline, now I have to cut the splines. The splines are about 2.75” x .125”, so I raised the blade of my TS up to 3”, moved the fence in tight, and proceeded to feed a piece of .75” x 3” X 18” clear pine thru, sitting on the 3”side.

Well, oh my god, my Hitachi C10FL was choking on it, and the wood was smoking, and eventually the safety breaker blew. Can someone enlighten me with the correct way to cut splines?

Thanks a bunch.

Jack

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