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View Ron Aylor's profile

Journey's End

03-05-2018 07:08 PM by Ron Aylor | 19 comments »

Journey’s End - Lent, an Old English word meaning spring, the time of lengthening days, is that season of the Church between Ash Wednesday and Easter. Many Christians commit to giving up certain types of luxuries as a form of penance, during this season. Another approach to Lent is of taking on,  or adding a spiritual discipline, to draw oneself nearer to God.  I exceeded the forty days  of Lent, by just a bit, as I chose to take on a discipline in the form of building and subsequently ...

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View WoodMosaics's profile

Making a Tumbling Block Cribbage Board

11-01-2010 10:44 PM by WoodMosaics | 23 comments »

I will start this blog the same way I started the one on making a Lazy Susan. Now before I get started on this little demonstration of how I do it, let me caution you on a couple things. IF you try anything like this, take the plate that your saw blade comes up through and close that hole completely up with a thin piece of wood. Make sure it is even with the top, with no gaps and no lips to catch the pieces. You want it smooth. Then with a “Hollow ground plywood blade” come up from the bot...

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View shipwright's profile

Simple Jigs and Techniques #14: Fast Accurate Louis Cubes

12-31-2017 06:04 AM by shipwright | 23 comments »

Louis cubes have been around for ever and with good reason. They are just a great 3D illusion.I was making some this week for a couple of parquetry panels in my current project and took some pictures of the way I do it.Maybe someone can use the ideas. First I rough ripped the strips of ribbon Bloodwood veneer on my sled with a covering piece of 3/4” plywood. Then I trued them to exact width with a simple shooting board. On to the guillotine to chop the trapezoids. If you get t...

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View Dan's profile

Making The Very Small Wood Hinge III

07-09-2017 04:26 PM by Dan | 6 comments »

Latest refinements on my small hinge making process. First, an upgrade on my router sled which allows better control and smoother sliding with excellent accuracy. That Ridgid router in the picture is still going strong after years of heavy use. Set up to plane maple hinge halves to 1/8”. I want to cut down the time it takes to make these so I need to develop standard procedures with detail. So, after planing they are cut to identical lengths and widths. When I am trimming thes...

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View BanjoBen's profile

Trefoil How-to

04-10-2017 03:20 PM by BanjoBen | 9 comments »

I posted this project over the weekend and got several questions from people about it, so I thought I’d share some of the process in case anyone’s interested. You can find out more about where the object comes from here: http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.314.4240and here:https://arxiv.org/abs/0811.0225Be warned….there’s math in them thar links! The process is pretty straightforward. To begin, I cut bars 1 inch x 1 inch, making sure they ...

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View GnarlyErik's profile

Jigs and Tools #2: A Bee's Knees Wood Bender Thingy

11-29-2016 11:31 PM by GnarlyErik | 10 comments »

(See update below, at bottom!) In a long career, I’ve used all sorts of rigs to bend wood, from steam boxes, steam jennies, wood boiling rigs, rosebud torches played on wet rags and heat guns. Some time ago I built myself a propane fired steam-box for bending things like boat frames and plank ends. But it is so big and gawky it mostly just serves as merely another shelf in my garage workshop. I’m on a kick building stringed musical instruments right now, which requires bendi...

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View shipwright's profile

Marquetry Cutting Styles #4: "Painting in Wood"

05-03-2012 12:58 AM by shipwright | 27 comments »

At last I have photos to describe one more saw cutting marquetry style. I’m new to this one and didn’t feel up to trying to describe it without good photos. The “Painting in Wood” style of marquetry cutting dates to early 17th century France and gets its name from the relationship of the typical subject material to the work of the painters of the period. The brightly colored baskets of fruit and flowers typical of many pieces of this period are examples of this styl...

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View shipwright's profile

Marquetry Cutting Styles #3: Classic Style

06-12-2011 04:39 PM by shipwright | 16 comments »

The Classic Style is the most difficult of the saw cut styles to master. It involves cutting each piece separately, from packets of veneer, each composed of only one color or species. It’s considerable advantage is that it can produce as many identical motifs as the number of layers in your packets. This can reduce the labor and increase the speed of production of pieces with repetitive motifs or enable the production of several identical pieces. The first step as in other styles is ...

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View shipwright's profile

Marquetry Cutting Styles #2: Boulle Style

06-11-2011 07:48 PM by shipwright | 16 comments »

This style is named for one of the great masters, Andre-Charles Boulle (1642-1732) and it differs from double bevel style in several ways. In both Boulle style and Classic style, which I’ll cover next, it is imperative that the blade is at exactly 90 degrees to the work, both vertically and horizontally.Also in both these styles cutting is done in a “packet” of veneers rather than piece by piece as is done in double bevel. This results in several pieces of identical shape on...

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View Longcase's profile

Marquetry card table by John Linnell #1: A bit of history and building the frame

04-25-2016 02:10 AM by Longcase | 8 comments »

I remember the moment I became interested in marquetry, it was while on vacation in England that I visited Keddlestone Hall ,a National Trust property in Derbyshire and saw this card table. The table was made in 1765 by the cabinetmaker John Linnell The marqueteur who worked for the Linnell firm at the time was Christopher Fuhrlohg, who was Paris trained possibly in the Simon Oeben workshop. Fuhrlohg was a Swedish cabinetmaker who returned to his native country a few years later...

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