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Workbench Build #6: Mmmm, bacon

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Blog entry by Mark Kornell posted 04-21-2014 04:30 AM 1241 reads 1 time favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 5: Square or round? Round or Square? Doggone it, somebody throw me a bone!!! Part 6 of Workbench Build series Part 7: The Left Tongue »

I finished routing out dog holes. Here’s what the jig looked like clamped over one of the roughed-out holes:

Pretty straightforward, taking 1/16” or less off each side. A bit more work on the head recess, but way easier than hogging out the whole hole with the router.

The darker area on the top of the jig is wax.

And here’s what I mean by bacon:

Those two boards should be flat and fit together without gaps! Instead I have 3/4” warpage over 4”.

I was hoping that I’d be able to clamp them flat during glue-up. So I did a dry clamp using the existing portion of the top as a massive caul on one side:

A couple of clamps short, good excuse to get some more :-)

Surprisingly, it was reasonably good. Not perfect, so I decided to mill the last (front) board and use that as a caul on the top side:

This also gives me my final top width – approximately 25 1/2”. Didn’t quite get the same yield on the jatoba boards as I did on the cherry, plus lost some more with resawing and trying to reflatten the two pieces of the dog board. Close enough to my target of 26”.

Put some glue on the puppy and let it sit in clamps for 48 hours. There are a couple of small gaps at the glue line, maybe on the order of 1/64”. None are large enough for the camera to pick up. I’ll probably try to get some epoxy in those gaps, mostly for aesthetic reasons.

After I released the clamps, the board stayed straight, so I’d consider this part of the process a success.

While I was at it, I also glued up the traveller block. I had enough from the cut off that I routed two holes, just in case I mess one up later.

Because the dog in the traveller needs to be sloped opposite to the dogs in the rest of the board, the easy way to do it is cut/route the dogs the same, and then simply turn the traveller around. That, however, means that the thin side of the two-part board will now be on the opposite side and there is the potential that the dog hole in the traveller will not quite line up with the rest of the dog holes. Not to mention that the glue line will switch sides and the grain direction will be reversed.

So OCD kicked in. I rebuilt the jig as a mirror image top/bottom and cut/routed the traveller so the dog hole will be sloped in the correct direction while the board maintains the “correct” orientation. Probably no one will ever notice that but me.

-- Mark Kornell, Kornell Wood Design



7 comments so far

View terryR's profile

terryR

3487 posts in 1055 days


#1 posted 04-21-2014 01:00 PM

A lot of great looking work, Mark! Dog hole board looks fine, and the wagon vice parts, too. Watching your wagon vice build with much OCD enthusiasm. :)

Hey, how do you like those pipe clamps with the tall red feet? ShopFox? Bessey? Seen them online, but wondered if they were better than the Jorgenson’s from the Borg? No shop has enough clamps…

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

View Mark Kornell's profile

Mark Kornell

644 posts in 1278 days


#2 posted 04-22-2014 03:06 AM

Yep, they are the Besseys. I’ve also used Jorgensons, prefer the Besseys. They both work well, no real functional differences. I just like the extra bit of clearance for my knuckles when tightening the screw.

And I agree, no shop has enough clamps. Over the last year I’ve been accumulating the parallel jaw clamps, but I prefer the pipe clamps for most glueups.

-- Mark Kornell, Kornell Wood Design

View Buckethead's profile (online now)

Buckethead

1940 posts in 616 days


#3 posted 05-07-2014 02:27 AM

Just read your blog on this again. Your bench is looking highly professional. Your shop has me just a little jealous ;-). I you notice mentioned of using epoxy to fill small gaps. There are a couple on my bench that would benefit from such a treatment. Can you elaborate on that process at all?

-- Bucket, any person that spends 10k on a bicycle is guaranteed to be a $@I almost started to like you. -bhog

View Mark Kornell's profile

Mark Kornell

644 posts in 1278 days


#4 posted 05-07-2014 03:00 AM

Well, I haven’t done any more work on the thing in the last 2 weeks – my wife thinks the house build is a higher priority :-) – so I haven’t filled in any gaps yet. But the process is simple.

First, decide how you’re going to color the epoxy. Uncolored epoxy looks a bit odd in the context of a wood project. Depends on what wood the gap is in. For dark wood, use a dark color. Light wood, light color. On dark woods, black or dark brown analine dye powder works well, as does fine coffee grounds. You can blend natural pigments together, too. And sanding dust from the wood in question will get you a near-perfect color match, quite useful with lighter woods where a pigment/dye match is difficult to do. Or you could bling it up with some copper or brass filings and crushed turquoise :-) Anyways, figure out your coloring agent and have some of it on hand.

Then, put some making tape around the area to be filled. Get the edges of the tape pieces as close to the edges of the gap as you can, 1 mm or less. This helps to keep the epoxy from levelling out where you don’t need it.

Third, mix up some epoxy. Hardware store variety 5-minute epoxy works just fine. Mix it well, and when you think you’re done, mix it some more.

Fourth, mix in the coloring agent. You do this after you’ve mixed the epoxy well. Not too much, just enough to get the color. Too much and you’ll interfere with the epoxy’s ability to harden.

Fifth, get the epoxy into the gap. Not too much, just enough to fill the gap and a little bit more. It should overflow slightly, that’s what the masking tape is for.

Sixth, wait until the epoxy sets up but before it hardens fully. You should be able to touch it without leaving a fingerprint, but if you press on it hard it should deform slightly. That’s about 15 minutes using the 5-minute stuff. Then remove the masking tape.

Let the epoxy fully cure overnight or longer (read the information that came with the epoxy to determine full cure time). Then you can remove the excess epoxy with a sharp chisel or plane.

Easy-peasy. Probably took me longer to type that out than it would take to actually fill a gap.

-- Mark Kornell, Kornell Wood Design

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

10340 posts in 1365 days


#5 posted 05-07-2014 03:22 AM

Mark, thank you for the epoxy lesson!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View Buckethead's profile (online now)

Buckethead

1940 posts in 616 days


#6 posted 05-07-2014 03:29 AM

Yeah mark… ^^^ thanks!

Have used epoxy in framing for tie downs, and on a transmission one time, but never with a color match. I have been saving dust from sanding. Very fine. I think it will serve as the caulk which makes me what I ain’t.

-- Bucket, any person that spends 10k on a bicycle is guaranteed to be a $@I almost started to like you. -bhog

View terryR's profile

terryR

3487 posts in 1055 days


#7 posted 05-07-2014 01:14 PM

Guys, here’s another option for filling gaps and cracks…Elmer’s Fiberglass Resin. Get it at the Borg with extra hardener. Can be mixed with oil paints, acrylic, sawdust, pretty much anything to get the color you want.

I used a ton on my bench…black paint for the cracks, reddish umber for the reddish pine around the knots. Cures slower than epoxy, and stinks, but it’s a little cheaper by the gallon than epoxy! :)

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

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