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Modern, to Traditional

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Blog entry by IantheTinker posted 03-03-2018 11:29 PM 496 reads 0 times favorited 20 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I have been thinking more about trying my hand at more traditional projects, with more traditional techniques, using more traditional tools. I get tired of all the noise from power tools and sometimes desire a more quiet, peaceful workspace. Though, I must admit, I am pretty rubbish with any handsaw aside from a Japanese pullsaw, my hand plane is a finicky thing from HF, my chisels are cheap and don’t hold an edge well, and I am largely unskilled in every way imaginable. However, using more hand tools would help save on space and prep time as I won’t have to purchase planers and jointers and take time setting up the table saw and other types of jigs.

I wouldn’t want to go all in on hand tools though, as the convenience of power tools can be, well, convenient (especially for repeatability). I suppose I would need to find a balance or just simply go with whatever I felt like using for the current project.

How do the rest of you folks do it?

-- “How you feeling, Roy?”... “a little unappreciated, Al...” - Die Hard



20 comments so far

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

9249 posts in 1452 days


#1 posted 03-03-2018 11:51 PM

Dimensioning with power. Joinery to finishing with hand.

I’ll cut dados and rabbets on a table saw and finish with a router plane. Whatever is faster.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View IantheTinker's profile

IantheTinker

222 posts in 94 days


#2 posted 03-03-2018 11:57 PM



Dimensioning with power. Joinery to finishing with hand.

I’ll cut dados and rabbets on a table saw and finish with a router plane. Whatever is faster.

- TheFridge

A router plane? I have never heard of that before, what is it?

-- “How you feeling, Roy?”... “a little unappreciated, Al...” - Die Hard

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2503 posts in 614 days


#3 posted 03-04-2018 12:01 AM

100% by hand.

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

9249 posts in 1452 days


#4 posted 03-04-2018 12:41 AM

The “original” router.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View IantheTinker's profile

IantheTinker

222 posts in 94 days


#5 posted 03-04-2018 12:46 AM



The “original” router.

- TheFridge

I just looked them up, they are pretty neat looking!

-- “How you feeling, Roy?”... “a little unappreciated, Al...” - Die Hard

View IantheTinker's profile

IantheTinker

222 posts in 94 days


#6 posted 03-04-2018 12:46 AM



100% by hand.

- Ron Aylor

How do you handle ripping boards?

-- “How you feeling, Roy?”... “a little unappreciated, Al...” - Die Hard

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

11481 posts in 2347 days


#7 posted 03-04-2018 01:33 AM

Whatever is faster and 90% of the time that is power. But I understand the satisfaction that some people find in being a Neander. :)

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View IantheTinker's profile

IantheTinker

222 posts in 94 days


#8 posted 03-04-2018 02:25 AM



Whatever is faster and 90% of the time that is power. But I understand the satisfaction that some people find in being a Neander. :)

- Woodknack

Whoa! Rick incognito!

I completely understand going with the quicker option, that is why I currently use power tools the most. But, sometimes they do take longer due to setup time, that and I can’t have a conversation with one of my kids with all that noise. My kids like to sit on the basement steps and chat with me while I work and I would like to take advantage of more of those opportunities. The biggest problem is that many of my projects are larger and involve sheets of plywood, so a powered saw is almost a necessity. Which is why I am curious how Ron Aylor rips his stock.

-- “How you feeling, Roy?”... “a little unappreciated, Al...” - Die Hard

View DJL1031's profile

DJL1031

16 posts in 60 days


#9 posted 03-04-2018 05:00 AM

I have recently begun to integrate people-powered hand tools into my workflow. My accuracy is not quite as good as with power tools, but once I get the hang of keeping planes, chisels and scrapers sharp, watch out. I still think power tools have a place in the workshop. I currently do not own a planer or joiner, so the transition should be fairly easy.

Also, Fine Woodworking mag recently issued a special addition on hand tools, featuring a router plane.

-- Dave "It's not what the man makes out of wood, but what the wood makes out of the man"

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2503 posts in 614 days


#10 posted 03-04-2018 11:18 AM


100% by hand.

- Ron Aylor

How do you handle ripping boards?

- IantheTinker

By hand with a rip saw …
 

 

 

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View IantheTinker's profile

IantheTinker

222 posts in 94 days


#11 posted 03-05-2018 12:10 AM

That must help keep you in shape, Ron! Maybe I should pick it up just for that benifit, lol. Do you work with plywood much, is ripping that pretty much the same as solid wood?

-- “How you feeling, Roy?”... “a little unappreciated, Al...” - Die Hard

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2503 posts in 614 days


#12 posted 03-05-2018 12:20 AM


That must help keep you in shape, Ron! Maybe I should pick it up just for that benifit, lol. Do you work with plywood much, is ripping that pretty much the same as solid wood?

- IantheTinker

Unfortunately, I do not work with plywood. I use solid lumber only. Ripping plywood with a hand saw might cause tear-out. And yes … working the way I do does indeed help keep me in shape … LOL!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View IantheTinker's profile

IantheTinker

222 posts in 94 days


#13 posted 03-05-2018 12:38 AM

Yes, I suppose that would be rough on the veneer of the plywood. Trouble is, most larger projects I am asked to make calls for plywood at some point. I suppose I will always be a bit of a “hybrid” woodworker.

Ever since I began homeschooling my kids I have been more sedentary, I could use a workout with some hand tools. Amazing how your strength can wane without you noticing. I used to work at Culligan lugging around salt bags, water softener tanks, and 5 gallon water jugs all day. Suffice it to say, my grip was never stronger as during that time, and hasn’t been as strong since. I miss it.

-- “How you feeling, Roy?”... “a little unappreciated, Al...” - Die Hard

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

1952 posts in 549 days


#14 posted 03-05-2018 01:03 AM

Do you work with plywood much, is ripping that pretty much the same as solid wood?

I cut plywood with a panel saw, Ian. 5’ square sheets of quarter-inch Baltic birch ply are a pain in the winter, since I have to saw them with them standing on edge and they flex all over the place, but tearout is fairly minimal with a sharp saw, and I can plane the edge smooth with a half-dozen passes with the jack plane once the ply is cut down to size.

Mostly I use the aggressive hardware store saw from Brooklyn Tool, which looks like it would have a crazy amount of tearout, but it’s never as bad as I fear when I start cutting. And I can cut a foot-square panel out by hand in less time than it would take me to set up the sawhorses, extension cord, and circular saw. The angle you saw at can cut down on tearout too. Technique matters more with hand tools, but it’s not rocket science.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View IantheTinker's profile

IantheTinker

222 posts in 94 days


#15 posted 03-05-2018 01:21 AM

Wow, Dave, that is a really neat looking saw. I am afraid it is out of my price range though, I will have to go with something a good bit cheaper, probably from a big box store. Thanks for sharing that you cut down plywood with something so ordinary seeming, makes the whole idea less intimidating.

-- “How you feeling, Roy?”... “a little unappreciated, Al...” - Die Hard

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