LumberJocks

Claro Walnut Box #3: Ready to Choose Finish

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by HorizontalMike posted 12-08-2016 07:51 PM 653 reads 0 times favorited 16 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Fixin' Fowl-ups/Chick-ups? Progress on ClaroWalnut-Box Part 3 of Claro Walnut Box series Part 4: Lessons from Finishing »

Ready to choose finish Here are my options in stock:

  • Wipe-on Varnish (MW Tung Oil Finish)
  • Epoxy—West Systems w/#207 Clear Hardener
  • Shellac (Clear)
  • BLO

FWIW, I hate “flash” photography. It really brings out flaws and false contrasts, IMO. To the eye, my corner lid fix does not have that much contrast. I wet with denatured alcohol to clean of dust and to be able to see what the box looks like with a finish.

Things look better than these images, so now I need advice on a preferred finish. I have used all of the above, HOWEVER, I have not used West Systems Epoxy as a finish. I used to vacuum-bag Obechi and fiberglass onto model aircraft airfoils with the stuff, but that is a whole different animal… Have not used epoxy as a paint-on finish. I am assuming that the epoxy has to be buffed out after applying right?

Any suggestions out there? What finish would do the Claro Walnut the most justice?

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."



16 comments so far

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2799 posts in 1981 days


#1 posted 12-08-2016 09:41 PM

Hey, Mike, that is a nice job on the fix. It isn’t on your list of readily available options, but I really like Danish oil followed by Deft rattle can gloss spray lacquer followed by paste wax. Whatever you do will look great with that beautiful Claro. Good luck!

-- Art

View sras's profile (online now)

sras

4552 posts in 2853 days


#2 posted 12-08-2016 09:48 PM

Hi Mike,

If you wanted to try epoxy (which I wouldn’t) you are going to want to apply a UV blocking finish over the epoxy. Over time, epoxy will yellow from exposure to sunlight. I used it on my wood kayak and it is a very hard covering. There are several coats of marine grade polyurethane on top of the epoxy. And yes, epoxy will need to be sanded and polished before adding a final finish.

Any of the other finished you list will work. I use a water based polyurethane for last few projects. Art’s finishes always look great – I’m sure he has a solid recommendation.

BTW – I think the repair turned out great!

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View dannmarks's profile

dannmarks

284 posts in 305 days


#3 posted 12-09-2016 12:09 AM

I had forgotten about Deft Finish. I do like that finish. I prefer to use General Finish products my self. In the past I have liked danish or tung oil because after some time you can just hit it again with a new coat of oil to make it look like new again. I have had great results with that myself.

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

9850 posts in 3776 days


#4 posted 12-09-2016 04:58 AM

I hate Flash too… BUT, you should have a good light on the subject… you can then take sheets of white paper pasted on cardboard and place the cardboard around to Bounce the Light to the Left and to the Right, etc. to get the subject fully lighted… Your picture has only one focal point… the one closest to the light.

If this box is going to be the typical Indoor box, EPOXY would be a terrible choice… I wouldn’t even think of it…

I have always had very good luck with dewaxed Blonde shellac… maybe 5-6 thin coats until you like what you see as GOOD… Applied with a rag ball, applying a thin coat… Do not go over the coat while still wet… Wipe it on and leave it alone till dry (in a few minutes)... then apply the next coat, etc. ... Each coat will be blended into the previous coat, building one NICE coat! You can put any number of coats on it… You will be able to tell when you see what you want… then stop.

Then follow it up with a very light sanding of 600+ grit sandpaper… followed by a Waxing…

You will love it…

If you ever think it need a Touch Up… Apply more wax, etc. OR Wipe off the wax with Paint thinner and just apply a few more coats of Shellac! etc. etc.

Just my two bits… worth exactly what you paid for it… LOL

It works for me…

If it’s going to get Wear & Tear, then, instead of Waxing, apply a clear coat or two of Lacquer or Deft… for more protection…

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7544 posts in 2637 days


#5 posted 12-09-2016 01:18 PM

Thanks guys! So skip the epoxy…

I had forgotten about using Deft ( I think I still have a can of it in hand). I used Deft on my hand plane totes and knobs and it worked well. That being said, I will probably use my MW Tung Oil Finish (wipe on varnish) and then finish up with 600-grit and a final coat of Deft.

I have already used shellac on two large projects, and while I like the looks the durability is somewhat lacking. Even though re-finishing is easy enough I think I want greater durability on this one.

Oh yeah, one more question:
Have any of you used the spray-on flocking to line the bottom of your boxes? Using this adhesive.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View dannmarks's profile

dannmarks

284 posts in 305 days


#6 posted 12-09-2016 10:35 PM

It is a pretty simple process so whatever you use should turn out very well. When doing an inside corner spraying has some areas where it can get a very light coating of fiber… I have simply applied glue and then used a standard applicator to apply the flocking material. It always went well. I am sure the stuff from Grizzly will work just fine. I am sure I used tight bond glue myself. So let us know.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7544 posts in 2637 days


#7 posted 12-10-2016 12:02 AM



It is a pretty simple process so whatever you use should turn out very well. When doing an inside corner spraying has some areas where it can get a very light coating of fiber… I have simply applied glue and then used a standard applicator to apply the flocking material. It always went well. I am sure the stuff from Grizzly will work just fine. I am sure I used tight bond glue myself. So let us know. – dannmarks

Wow. Interesting. So no need for the proprietary adhesive or such. That save me a buck or two, but shipping seems to eat that savings up rather quickly… Maybe I should plan on getting a couple of colors as a precursor of future projects, huh…

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Matt Hegedus's profile

Matt Hegedus

144 posts in 517 days


#8 posted 12-10-2016 02:28 PM

I’m not going to give my input on finishing because I’m not that experienced.

Just want to say try NOT using a flash in the pics. Or take it outside in natural light. I wanna see that Claro in proper lighting!

-- From Pittsburgh, PA

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7544 posts in 2637 days


#9 posted 12-11-2016 03:26 PM



I m not going to give my input on finishing because I m not that experienced.
Just want to say try NOT using a flash in the pics. Or take it outside in natural light. I wanna see that Claro in proper lighting!
- Matt Hegedus

Yeah, I should know better about using the flash.

BTW, I am on my 3rd coat of MW Tung Oil Finish and the wood is still sucking it up. It may end up taking 6-8 coats before I can move on to Deft spray lacquer for the final shine. Places where it is still sucking up the finish are dull while other areas shining. Time will tell.

I am being patient, just 1-coat/day… 8-)

...................................


It is a pretty simple process so whatever you use should turn out very well. When doing an inside corner spraying has some areas where it can get a very light coating of fiber… I have simply applied glue and then used a standard applicator to apply the flocking material. It always went well. I am sure the stuff from Grizzly will work just fine. I am sure I used tight bond glue myself. So let us know. – dannmarks

Just got the order for flocking off to Grizzly. Ordering Black and Brown for now.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7544 posts in 2637 days


#10 posted 12-11-2016 11:49 PM

Three coats of MW Tung Oil Finish (wipe on varnish) and counting. I am being as patient as I can,... this could take a while… ;-)

Truth be told, the various textures of Claro Walnut really do act differently and will take quite few coats to completely fill the grain. It is nice to see the grain starting to pop now.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7544 posts in 2637 days


#11 posted 12-21-2016 07:18 PM

I am now up to 8-coats of MW Tung Oil Finish. I buffed with #000 steel wool on coats 3 and 6, so what you see here is 2-coats after the last buffing. What looked “filled” now appears to have the pores again sucking up finish. Does anyone know if this wipe on varnish dissolves earlier coats and reopens the pores?

Would it be prudent to start spraying on lacquer at this point?

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

9850 posts in 3776 days


#12 posted 12-21-2016 07:26 PM

IMHO… YES… after several days (maybe a week or two) to let the oil fully cure… in order to prevent any future problems.

LOOKING GOOD…

You might lightly sand with a High Grit and a little oil to fill those pores… Before letting it sit for 1-2 weeks before another VERY LIGHT sanding and Lacquer coats…

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7544 posts in 2637 days


#13 posted 12-21-2016 07:37 PM

Thanks Joe. Are suggesting a light buff/sand (#000 or 600-grit) with maybe BLO, and then let the BLO & sanding dust dry/fill-pores before lacquer?

I have some 1500-grit for final polishing once I can get all these pores filled. BTW, each coat had at least 24-hours between each new coat.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

9850 posts in 3776 days


#14 posted 12-21-2016 07:46 PM

YES… 600 grit should be good… BLO OK too (you want a slurry to fill pores). Let cure for 1-2 weeks… and then a light sanding of 1500 grit Before the Lacquering…

Several Lacquer coats… with a super light 1500 grit sanding between Lacquer coats and after final coat… for super smooth finish… Then, if you want, wax it…

Should end up SUPER SMOOTH and protected… that will last a very long time…

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7544 posts in 2637 days


#15 posted 01-08-2017 07:32 PM

Well Joe, after 15-20 coats of wipe-on varnish, I sprayed my first coat of lacquer today. The box looks pretty good, but the top wrinkled. Looks like I will have to start over on the top… 8-( Oh well.

Over all, I think this is coming along, though far from perfect. Great learning experience, but the patience is wearing thin and I want to get-r-dun already. I am holding off starting another box because of the introduced dust and the like.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

showing 1 through 15 of 16 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com