LumberJocks

Claro Walnut Box #1: Chipout on top corner

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Blog entry by HorizontalMike posted 12-06-2016 12:53 PM 1023 reads 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Claro Walnut Box series Part 2: Fixin' Fowl-ups/Chick-ups? Progress on ClaroWalnut-Box »

While trying to size my box, I got a chip-out on the front corner of the lid when I tried to use my jointer to square up the top before mounting. The jointer ate most of the chip, and I only found a small part the was glue-up fixable. My guess is that Claro Walnut, having grain direction all over the place, seems to be VERY susceptible to tear-out/chip-out.

Questions:

  • How best to to fix this? Wood putty?
  • How best to round over finger joints and top?

    1. Router?

    2. Tablesaw at 45 angle and then sand? (all sides 5/8” thick so significant round-over possible)

    3. Belt-sander?

    4. Quarter sheet sander? This would take forever.

Practice, practice, practice… Tuning in the finger joint with a Incra I-Box:

Forstner bit to help cut lock recess:

Assembled, but not finished box:

!https://s3.amazonaws.com/vs-lumberjocks.com/ohrkokr.jpg!

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."



12 comments so far

View gargey's profile

gargey

851 posts in 585 days


#1 posted 12-06-2016 01:05 PM

almost looks like it was a knot.

View Kaleb the Swede's profile

Kaleb the Swede

1785 posts in 1779 days


#2 posted 12-06-2016 03:27 PM

What about some edge banding of some sort? Shave it down some and have some contrast wood.

-- Just trying to build something beautiful

View jbay's profile (online now)

jbay

1793 posts in 709 days


#3 posted 12-06-2016 04:15 PM

You could cut it off following the grain then replace it with a matching piece of wood.
You will always see the line but if it’s within the grain it helps hide it better than anything else.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

View mafe's profile

mafe

11623 posts in 2899 days


#4 posted 12-06-2016 05:09 PM

Looking good!
Fine work and repair, to fix is as important as to make.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7623 posts in 2723 days


#5 posted 12-06-2016 05:57 PM



You could cut it off following the grain then replace it with a matching piece of wood.
You will always see the line but if it s within the grain it helps hide it better than anything else.

- jbay

I got to thinking something like what you suggest, however with my talents or lack there of, I am thinking that the cut-away and replacement need to be on a straight line. Maybe angled at a 45 to help hide the defect/flaw/F-up from view directly overhead. That piece I found and glued back pretty much covers the entire top corner.

So… I need to keep the end grain going in same direction. That should cover both the side and the front corner of the lid. As you can see in the first image, I have plenty of scrap to work with. I just need to figure out “how” to set up my TS cut, PLUS how I will hold the repair and lid while cutting.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

9963 posts in 3862 days


#6 posted 12-06-2016 08:55 PM

The FIX:
I assume you don’t have the piece that came out of it… If you have it, glue it back on… fill slight gaps with a sawdust slurry of white glue.

If you don’t have the piece…
Cut a straight (or a controlled part of a circle) line next to broken area to get a consistent edge.
Cut another piece, from other wood, matching the best that you can with the grain and Glue it on.
... Wood putty would make real MESS out of it.

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7623 posts in 2723 days


#7 posted 12-07-2016 02:04 AM



The FIX:
I assume you don t have the piece that came out of it… If you have it, glue it back on… fill slight gaps with a sawdust slurry of white glue.
If you don t have the piece…
Cut a straight (or a controlled part of a circle) line next to broken area to get a consistent edge.
Cut another piece, from other wood, matching the best that you can with the grain and Glue it on.
... Wood putty would make real MESS out of it.
- Joe Lyddon

Yeah, all of the above… Trying to find reasonable matching piece (grain AND direction) but nothing is perfect. May have to use Walnut dye on fixed area, just to cover it up… Don’t know what else to do. Not a big piece, but a first for me… 8-(...

Not in a hurry, and that helps my thought process. Too quick and I F-up too many times. Still have “hinge” screw holes where I misjudged on the back of the lid… 8-(... Getting old enough that everything seems to be an “issue” of some sort… Urgh!... I hate that chit… 8-(

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View mafe's profile

mafe

11623 posts in 2899 days


#8 posted 12-07-2016 01:55 PM

Try to see it as a charm.
Or make the fix visible, perhaps with a dovetail. like this it will be a story, not a mistake, the Japanese do that.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

9963 posts in 3862 days


#9 posted 12-07-2016 06:16 PM

Mads… Good idea…

Using a contrasting wood like Maple, etc. Inlay a unique simple design in every corner…

Part of a star… Angled dovetail… Part of a circle… etc.
... simple… but COOL…

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7623 posts in 2723 days


#10 posted 12-07-2016 10:14 PM



Try to see it as a charm.
Or make the fix visible, perhaps with a dovetail. like this it will be a story, not a mistake, the Japanese do that.
Best thoughts,
Mads
- mafe

Yes, great idea! However I have already glued a piece on the area and am hoping for the best!

Being a “small volume” producer/hobbyist”, every project is a learning experience! Geez… if I didn’t to enjoy this hobby so much, then I should just go ride my Harley… That said, even my Harley has had the needed attention this past year with my striking my 3rd deer, those repairs, adding Fat-Daddy wheels, and rebuilding the front fork-tubes/springs and such…

Geez!... It’s almost like sex,... which one is best, which one is best?... Never a definitive answer…

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

9963 posts in 3862 days


#11 posted 12-07-2016 11:58 PM

Once thing about it… if this Fix does not suit you, you can always go back and do simple Inlay at each corner to make it look like it was PLANNED… :) LOL

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View mafe's profile

mafe

11623 posts in 2899 days


#12 posted 12-08-2016 01:52 PM

Laugh, yes life sure is terrible…
ANd no there are no answe, thats what we slowly learn in life.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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