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Plantation Shutters #17: Rabbets, beads, ammonia basswood, and miter saw accuracy error

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Blog entry by Holbs posted 06-30-2017 04:59 AM 1078 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 16: Testing of stain, gel, oil, charred, ammonia, and shellac on basswood. For science! Part 17 of Plantation Shutters series Part 18: Drilled dowel holes, applied shellac, charred stiles & rails, wire brushed »

Unsure which to pick though it’s down to two finish colors: the 2 coats of Shellac, char, wipe with water or walnut gel stain. Still have time to decide.
Ran the rails through the dado stack to create rabbets. Setup the router using the supplied Rockler bead bit. Forgot the ammonia “fumed” basswood yesterday evening so this is actually 48 hour result…kinda blandish hue icky. Apparently, I did not setup my Bosch 12” miter saw correctly though I spent 2 hours trying to do just that some weeks ago. Over 20” span, there is a large gap…nearly 1/4”. Unacceptable but yet lucky that the rails are tapered outwards instead of inwards. I think I’ll just use miter saw for rough cuts for now on and build a table saw sled this weekend.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter



4 comments so far

View edapp's profile

edapp

58 posts in 1185 days


#1 posted 06-30-2017 11:24 AM

Have you put a straight edge on the boards? I wouldn’t blame that gap solely on the miter saw. If it were the miter saw, you should be able to easily see that amount of error when holding a square to the blade/fence/bed. That would about a full degree off.
My guess is you had some movement at some point after the milling process, and you ought to be able to pull it in during glue up, and maybe use a dowel or other fastener to hold tight.

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

1681 posts in 1785 days


#2 posted 06-30-2017 01:21 PM

Yes I could allow that gap and proceed with dowels, glue, and clamping. It would look find in the end. I halted when I found this out, frustrated and needed to take a break. I’ll investigate further with squares this weekend but I suspect my miter saw fence as the culprit.
By my caveman math… This might be a wonderful way to test accuracy of miter saw cuts (or any cut) if you don’t have a caliper or accurate measuring tool. Since 4 1/2” width rail board, maybe 4 1/2” divided by the 20” stile span divided by 2 (since using 2 edges) = how much you are off (as long as the 20” stiles are straight). Might try this on some 12” plywood cuts on miter saw to see (longer cuts “should” be easier and accurate than 4 1/2” for the math)

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

View edapp's profile

edapp

58 posts in 1185 days


#3 posted 06-30-2017 02:01 PM

My math was 1 degree over a one foot span would be 1/8th inch, so 1/4 inch over 2’. Anyway that is really the curvature of the board (or the cumulative error of both ends of the rail) so if it is the saw it may be more like 1/2 a degree, which again i would think you would easily see with a good square against the fence/blade or a straightedge along the length of the fence. You will need both of these tools to make a good crosscut sled so might as well check out the miter saw first.

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

1681 posts in 1785 days


#4 posted 06-30-2017 02:25 PM

Yep..more checking out this weekend. And I think my math is flawed as well because I made the rail cuts identical, meaning both ends of the rail edges should be identical / parallel to each other giving no gap but being out of square to the other edges. Conundrum. I’ll investigate :)

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

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