LumberJocks

Dust Collection #2: Finished Already

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by HokieMojo posted 1407 days ago 4474 reads 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Building an Air purifier Part 2 of Dust Collection series no next part

Sorry this component of my dust collection system didn’t get broken down into steps better, but I was juggling so many things at once (workshop and family related) that I couldn’t get good photos and keep up with the posts. Here is the dust collector that I built from a recycled AC blower unit and how I came up with the design.

I had a perfect spot high on an empty wall. It would be out of the way, but central enough to get good air circulation. Here is my planned location. It is a small space, so I had to make my air filter fit.

More specifically, here:

I used a fan provided by my favorite heating and air company. I’m probably their favorite customer too after spending about 10 yrs worth of woodworking budget with them this year (-:

A little grungy, but I was assured it was in great condition. It was VERY quiet (aside from the whoosh of air) when I tested it.

I also wanted to be able to set the blower to run for a little while and hopefully shut off on its own so I used a timer switch.

The final project consists of a box made of 3/4” construction grade plywood. It is 21.5 inches wide, by 21.5 inches deep and about 30 inches tall. These dimensions are important because it uses 20×20 filters. The filters slide in through a flip up door on the front. They slide in along 3 pairs of runners (1”x1”x20” mdf strips). I made one mistake and hung the unit too close to the ceiling and the door doesn’t open far enough to fit the top filter in. I’ll just make due with two filters I guess. The unit is hung on a french cleat. The top of the unit was just 1/4” plywood that I cut a HUGE hole out of to allow the air to be pulled in. Without further delay, here is the unit installed:

I do plan to put chicken wire or something like it over the front opening. It feels pretty dangerous to have that fan spinning at high speed and completely exposed. I can’t imagine what it would be like if a tall board were to bump the blades when I am moving them around. Enjoy and let me know if you have questions. Sorry I don’t have more pictures. I didn’t have a ladder accessible to open the filter door right now.

Next up will be a revamped cart for my dust collector.

Special thanks to my friend Beej for helping me with the wiring and my dad for helping my get this heavy thing on the wall.



8 comments so far

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1772 days


#1 posted 1407 days ago

Great job !

I love the homemade air filtration units. So many ways to make a good one, and … with the better store-bought units being SO expensive … to save more than a few bucks, too !

-- -- Neil

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2247 days


#2 posted 1407 days ago

nicely done! unnoticeably, it will become a great addition to the shop.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2097 posts in 2326 days


#3 posted 1407 days ago

I should have added, my dad did a VERY scientific test where he held some sawdust in the air (while the unit was still on the ground) 3 feet above the top and 2 feet to the side of it. It pulled almost all of it, all the way over to the filter, even though it isn’t meant to pull anything nearly that large. It really pulled a LOT of air. I’m thrilled with my $40 build because it has a tiny footprint, is very effective, and was super inexpensive.

View Abbott's profile

Abbott

2570 posts in 1902 days


#4 posted 1407 days ago

I have done the same but I send the air outside through the wall. I draw my exhaust though a furnace filter before it leaves the building and I can see by the color of the filter when it needs to be changed. I use a plastic vent cover attached to the exterior siding that the force of the air opens when the fan is on and then gravity closes when I switch the fan off. It works great for evacuating dust, saw dust, exhaust fumes, smoke from cutting/welding and finish/paint fumes. I often comment that the blower fan is one of the best tools in my shop!

Nice work Hokie.

-- Ohh mann...pancakes and boobies...I'll bet that's what Heaven is like! ♣ ♣ ♣ ♣

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2097 posts in 2326 days


#5 posted 1407 days ago

Thanks Abbott,
That sounds like a pretty good idea too. I can certainly see this having plenty of force to open a small door. In fact, when I had it on a dolly to build it and test it, the blower could move it across the room on its own.

View Abbott's profile

Abbott

2570 posts in 1902 days


#6 posted 1407 days ago

-- Ohh mann...pancakes and boobies...I'll bet that's what Heaven is like! ♣ ♣ ♣ ♣

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2097 posts in 2326 days


#7 posted 1407 days ago

looks like we had twins. lol

View Abbott's profile

Abbott

2570 posts in 1902 days


#8 posted 1407 days ago

looks like we had twins. lol

Yeah, I saw that too and was laughing about it last night :) I sure like your timer idea and I may have to emm…”borrow” it :)

-- Ohh mann...pancakes and boobies...I'll bet that's what Heaven is like! ♣ ♣ ♣ ♣

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase