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Picture Frames: Mitered Half-Lap Joints #6: Plane and Sanded Surfaces on this Picture Frame

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Blog entry by HappyHowie posted 11-25-2016 02:18 AM 1515 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 5: Glue and Clamp Up Part 6 of Picture Frames: Mitered Half-Lap Joints series Part 7: Finished the Assembly of this Picture Frame »

I worked on my picture frame today by first removing the clamps. I then found a way to hold the frame on my workbench in order to begin using my #4 hand plane to smooth the front and back surfaces. Once I finished this process, I clamped the frame in my workbench vise and clamped the back end of the frame with a foot long clamp so the frame was held to the workbench. This way I could plane smooth the end grain to the miter half-lap joints.

After this I used my orbit sander to sand smooth the surfaces by going through the grits of 80, 120, 150, 220, and lastly 320.

I should have used wood filler in the small cracks before sanding this frame, but I did not think of that until I was ready to apply some sanding sealer. So I postponed the sanding sealer application since I used my cherry wood filler to fill these cracks.

Tomorrow I will resand the frame and then apply a coat of sanding sealer before applying a coat of finish.

-- --- Happy Howie



7 comments so far

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1489 posts in 3310 days


#1 posted 11-25-2016 03:49 PM

Hey Howie, love the frame! Have you tried adding glue into a joint, then sanding over it while it’s wet? This creates perfectly matching filler very easily.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View HappyHowie's profile

HappyHowie

440 posts in 1696 days


#2 posted 11-25-2016 04:32 PM

No I have not tried that, but I will. Thanks for the tip…

What I did you was some Timbermate cherry colored wood filler that I bought a while ago at my local Woodcraft store. I will sand it thoroughly today. If I see any further small cracks I follow your tip. Thanks.

-- --- Happy Howie

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

1511 posts in 341 days


#3 posted 11-26-2016 12:22 AM

A tip I got from a David Marks video years ago is to use thin CA glue to set the sawdust in the cracks. I keep a container of sawdust from each type of wood I work with to fill the crack, and then use the CA. You can also hand sand to get the sawdust in there, but I find it easier to just keep the sawdust on hand.

Also, the little disposable plastic 1ml pipettes make controlling the glue really easy. You can get a box of 500 for about $10. Beats the heck out of dealing with the crusty tips and glued-on caps I ultimately wind up with on my CA glue bottles.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View HappyHowie's profile

HappyHowie

440 posts in 1696 days


#4 posted 11-26-2016 02:45 AM

Rich,

Now I know why I kept some of my sawdust in baggies. They are sitting in one my coffee cans that are on that wall shelf. I must have read how important it was for fixing cracks. You know, I am having trouble remembering mornings, let alone yesterday.

I will have to search the 1 ml pipettes so I can have some on hand. That is a great idea.

I basically have two types of CA glue in my shop. The small very thin liquid for small repairs. The other is a large bottle of medium thickness that I use for making glue blocks for turning on my lathe.

I suspect the pipettes are the thin liquid CA glue.

I will do some experiments tomorrow so I will be better prepared for these situations.

I did sand the picture frame today. So the cherry wood filler is now gone and smoothed to the surfaces. I think it turned out very well. Let me go take a photograph so I can post it here.

Oh yeah, the other thing is that I realized that I did not have a 11 by 14 inch sheet of glass or acrylic to place in the frame in front of my matt and the photograph. I went to my local Home Depot whose online website said they had 11 of this size in stock. Turns out they zero. However, they did have that size in acrylic so I bought it plus the larger size of replacement glass of 12 by 16. I own a glass cutting tool, but I am not very skilled in cutting such small pieces. Cutting only an inch off may be trouble.

I also noticed that the acrylic sheet is oversized a bit too much in the 11 inch dimension. I have a cutter that also, but I will not work it tonight. It is too late. I will approach all of these tasks tomorrow when my body and mind is fresher.

-- --- Happy Howie

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

1511 posts in 341 days


#5 posted 11-26-2016 02:58 AM

Here are the pipettes I bought: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005CD2I50/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

They even work for gel. I’ve found the glue doesn’t dry and clog them either, so if I’m working on a project, I can get multiple uses out of one of them. Can’t waste two cents unless I have to :)

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View HappyHowie's profile

HappyHowie

440 posts in 1696 days


#6 posted 11-26-2016 03:05 AM

Rich, thanks for the link. I doubt I would have identified this product on my own. Thanks.

-- --- Happy Howie

View hnau's profile

hnau

88 posts in 294 days


#7 posted 11-30-2016 06:00 PM

-- Spammer in processed of being removed.

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