LumberJocks

Trestle Table #10: Tested Plunge Router JIG

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by HappyHowie posted 09-16-2016 03:39 AM 591 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 9: Mortise JIGs Part 10 of Trestle Table series Part 11: Next Steps: Cut Tenons Using Twin Blade Joinery Method »

I finally tested the plunge router mortising JIGs I made yesterday. I will need much more experience in using the router to make mortises. I used my digital caliper to measure the depths I was getting. For some reason the depth settings was not reliable, as yet. Went I route my mortises in the trestle table’s leg assemblies I will check the depths I have cut with the calipers.

I am still not decided whether I will square the routed mortises or round the tenons.

-- --- Happy Howie



4 comments so far

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7174 posts in 2041 days


#1 posted 09-16-2016 04:14 AM

Those are clean looking mortices Howie. I don’t understand the depth problem though.

Which router and jig were you using?

I’m guessing the previous part 9 is the jig, so which router was giving the depth problem?

View HappyHowie's profile

HappyHowie

327 posts in 1409 days


#2 posted 09-16-2016 04:44 AM

I have a Bosch MRC23EVSK router. I am using its plunge base. The plan is to plunge the mortises to nearly 1 1/4” deep. I had actually set the router bit within the router so a full plunge would to the desired 1 1/4 inches depth; well about 1/16 short of it.

The depth stop turret only sweeps 3/4 inches from its top to its bottom. I set the depth rod on top of the turret to start my plunges. I was going to reset its gauge after completing the first plunges to 3/4 inches, but I got confused. I need to revisit my method for getting to the full 1 /14 depth using the turret.

After each pass I was using my shop vac to clean out the mortises of the saw dust. I am using a 3/8” upcut router bit. Even with that I was having a lot of sawdust left in the mortise. So cleaning after each pass was helpful.

I was trying to control the depth about an 1/8 inch with each cut after plunging at each end to half the full distance. The test block I was using was douglas fir. My trestle table is cherry hardwood. I may not be able to plunge at each end to half its plunge depth. i will probably do another test piece with a cherry scrap board.

For some reason on the second mortise I was short about 1/4 inches when I thought I had completed the last cut. It was no problem since I double checked the depth with the caliper.

I have read articles by Chicago woodworker Jeff Miller. I cannot believe he recommends shaving only 1/32 inches for each router slice until he reaches his full mortise depth. How does he even know he is cutting just 1/32 of an inch? All that to avoid bit flex? I don’t believe it. It sounds like he is a bit OCD in that methodology.

-- --- Happy Howie

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7174 posts in 2041 days


#3 posted 09-16-2016 01:50 PM

Sounds like you’re doing everything right, practicing on scraps is wise.

I think the more you practice the better results you’ll have.

Good luck now.

View HappyHowie's profile

HappyHowie

327 posts in 1409 days


#4 posted 09-17-2016 12:57 AM

I had a very busy day today so I was not able to work in my shop. However, I did take a few more photos so I can display my JIG, the router setup and the mortises I test cut.
Front view of the router setup.

Backside view of my Bosch router with edge fence and guide.

The other mortise JIG creates two mortises each about 1 1/2” long so there will be a double tenon fittings into thee trestle feet.

-- --- Happy Howie

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com