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Blog entry by HT1591 posted 02-14-2017 02:17 PM 879 reads 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Hey guys I’m new here at lumberjocks and this is my first post I am currently building a large hexagonal case for a client. This is my first job in the woodworking field. The box is made from book matched cocobolo with is laminated onto plywood the inside of the case has aromatic cedar. All the panels are held together with dominoes but my top and bottom isn’t anywhere near square. I am learning the hard way to never buy plywood from Home Depot again some of the ply warped there bye making my final length crosscuts all about a 16th out of square the box is in 2 halfs at the moment and I can’t think of a way to square up the tops and bottoms other than using a few strap clamps to hold the 2 halfs together and finding a huge disc sander with a 14 inch capacity And help would be greatly appreciated



10 comments so far

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

2746 posts in 493 days


#1 posted 02-14-2017 03:05 PM

pictures would help a lot here …. :<))

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View sras's profile

sras

4596 posts in 2909 days


#2 posted 02-14-2017 05:47 PM

2nd on a picture or two – also, what tools are available?

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3148 days


#3 posted 02-14-2017 06:24 PM

Pics to start and more info on materials used. If your cut plywood pieces warped, you are nowhere near the right kind of plywood for this project. Start over before installing that nice veneer.

View HT1591's profile

HT1591

4 posts in 247 days


#4 posted 02-14-2017 06:25 PM

Hey guys I posted some pictures I need to glue on a top and bottom and don’t want any gaps also when I put hinges on I know I won’t have a point of reference for layout because I’m out of square

View HT1591's profile

HT1591

4 posts in 247 days


#5 posted 02-14-2017 06:30 PM

Steve I have a table saw miter saw band saw planer jointer some hand tools my hand planes aren’t tuned to well

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4303 posts in 919 days


#6 posted 02-14-2017 08:11 PM

From what I see in your pics, when you say “out of square” what you really mean is out of flat. In other words, if you lay a flat board across the top, there are gaps underneath. Am I understanding correctly?

If so, the fix isn’t that bad. You need to start by flattening one end. If it were me, I’d do this with a SHARP block plane and a flat board/plate/sheet/whatever to use as a reference.

If that’s not feasible, sit your piece on a flat surface so it’s sitting straight up and down. Use shims and make sure it can’t rock. Now take something flat that’s slightly thicker than the widest gap you can see. A piece of hardboard or metal flat bar should be about right. Use that to scribe a line across each side. Use a handsaw to cut down to your scribed lines. Now you should have a flat end.

Now it’s just a matter of measuring up to the other end and scribing lines and cutting to them. Now you should have flat ends that are parallel.

I hope I understood your problem right and that this is helpful!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View HT1591's profile

HT1591

4 posts in 247 days


#7 posted 02-14-2017 08:23 PM

Hey Kenny yes that is exactly my problem the tops and bottoms aren’t flat. I’m thinking about using your second method of scribing a line and then cutting to it I have an awesome Japanese handsaw that I think would work perfectly but I’m a little nervous to try it because I need both halfs exactly the same height I ideally want to do something repeatable for consistent results plus I have a month of work here invested I resawed everything my self flattened every thing and only had enough clamps to do one side at a time and I used epoxy so 12 days just gluing up the wood onto the plywood I wish I had a wide belt sander!!

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4303 posts in 919 days


#8 posted 02-14-2017 08:30 PM

Use strap clamps to hold the 2 halves together while you scribe the reference line. Cut the two of them and verify that it’s flat. Then it’s just a matter of measuring and scribing accurately. If you have a panel gauge, it would be a good time to use it. If you don’t, you can make a quick and dirty one with some scrap wood and a finish nail. That will eliminate measuring and marking errors.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View clyde1's profile

clyde1

3 posts in 286 days


#9 posted 02-14-2017 08:41 PM

Being a primarily hand tool guy – I would go ahead and clamp and glue it together then make your final adjustments with a hand plane – it is not much harder then planing the high spots until you get a good fit

View Kelster58's profile

Kelster58

298 posts in 320 days


#10 posted 02-14-2017 08:57 PM



From what I see in your pics, when you say “out of square” what you really mean is out of flat. In other words, if you lay a flat board across the top, there are gaps underneath. Am I understanding correctly?

Sit your piece on a flat surface so it s sitting straight up and down. Use shims and make sure it can t rock. Now take something flat that s slightly thicker than the widest gap you can see. A piece of hardboard or metal flat bar should be about right. Use that to scribe a line across each side. Use a handsaw to cut down to your scribed lines. Now you should have a flat end.

Now it s just a matter of measuring up to the other end and scribing lines and cutting to them. Now you should have flat ends that are parallel.

I hope I understood your problem right and that this is helpful!

- HokieKen

Very Impressive HokieKen…..sitting the piece upright on a flat surface and shimming it till it’s vertical and solid, then scribing a line is genius. Great advice and a great solution, way to go. Nice all you guys could help. I learn something everyday on LumberJocks. Thanks for sharing.

-- K. Stone “Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.” ― Benjamin Franklin

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