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Kerf Cutter With A Twist

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Blog entry by Grumpy posted 1728 days ago 7644 reads 1 time favorited 3 comments Add to Favorites Watch

After seeing some excellent ideas on Kerf Cutters I decided to do something a little different. This one uses the measuring tool as part of the jig. This is for the table saw but could be apapted for any machine.
As I see it there are two main issues;
First: and foremost there is the width of the gap for the joint
Second: there is that problemsome issue of the width of cut that stuffs everything up.
I couldn’t see why the measuting device for the assessing the kerf width could not be used.
So a pair of calipers form part of my jig. The kISS approach allways comes first in my book (Keep iut simple stupid). So use the device that measures the gap as part of the jig.
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To cover the second issue you need a block that is flush on one edge & the flip side represents an accurate measurement of the width of cut To do that I simply set up an adjustable spring loaded screw on one of the flip sides of what I call “The Adjustmant Block’. I made this out of perspecs
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A stop block was made out of perspecs. This has a groove to allow the “Adjustment Block” to align correctily. You may not think this is necessary.
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The calipers are supported by perspec blocks, grooved to fit the arm of the caliper. I made a few of these at different widths to allow for various Kerf widths.
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OPERATION
First: Set the calipers at zero & the adjustment block screw should be filipped on this line to represent the minimum cut. The adjustment block screw should have been calibrated to the saw cut width before any thing else.
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Second: After adjusting the stop block make the first cut where the joint extremity.
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Third: Take the calipers & measure & lock the width of the opposite piece to make the joint.
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Fourth: Flip the “Adjustment Block” to adjust for the width of the saw blade & put the calipers back to adjust for the next cut.
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Fifth: make the next extremity cut.
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Sixth: Cut out the waste between the two extremities & you should have a perfect joint.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python



3 comments so far

View jm82435's profile

jm82435

1264 posts in 2378 days


#1 posted 1726 days ago

I see you have a pair of calipers, do you have an indicator? something like this: http://www.wttool.com/product-exec/product_id/17329/nm/1_Indicator_Mag_Holder_Sets
I use a similar technique, but without jigs (not to rain on your parade; probably there are as many options as there are woodworkers)
1.Make your first pass (one edge of slot)
2.With your fancy digitals, set your calipers in the kerf as though you were measuring its width, hit zero, then go measure the thickness of your stock. This essentially gives you the width of your stock minus the width of your kerf, thus the distance to move your fence.
3. Use a dial indicator with magnetic base to offset the stop block over for the other edge of the slot. (if you have never used an indicator, you stick the indicator on the table inline with your stop block (assuming the magnet will stick to your table) so it touches the stop block, then zero the indicator. Move the stop block until it has moved (x distance – (determined earlier with your calipers)), clamp the stop block. You are ready to cut the other shoulder. (and clean out whatever lies between- same as you)
Essentially you are using your calipers to both measure the distance to move and reset your stop block. Try the indicator, I think you will find it fast, easy and accurate.

-- A thing of beauty is a joy forever...

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Grumpy

19393 posts in 2487 days


#2 posted 1726 days ago

Very good point Jim. As you said there are many options. The only thing with my one is the stop block does not move & I just flip the adjustment block over to allow for the width of cut. Also I only need to measure the cut once & that serves for all future cuts.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View jm82435's profile

jm82435

1264 posts in 2378 days


#3 posted 1725 days ago

The calipers (or the depth gauge – the part that is extending out of the calipers in the bottom photo) becomes the “stop” I referred to as a “stop block”. Thanks for sharing your method, it looks like it works well.

-- A thing of beauty is a joy forever...

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