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New lense for woodworking photos

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Blog entry by Greg The Cajun Box Sculptor posted 1007 days ago 4543 reads 0 times favorited 16 comments Add to Favorites Watch

What an amazing difference a camera lense makes for photographing my work. I have been using the stock lens that came with my Nikon camera (1st photo) and yesterday I bought A 35mm 1.8 lens (2nd photo) at the recommendation of the girl at the camera store….I can’t believe how much better the new lens works…The colors are so much more natural and realistic.

-- Every step of each project is considered my masterpiece because I want the finished product to reflect the quality of my work.



16 comments so far

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14552 posts in 2261 days


#1 posted 1007 days ago

What kind of a Nikon camera are you using?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Greg The Cajun Box Sculptor's profile

Greg The Cajun Box Sculptor

4898 posts in 1893 days


#2 posted 1007 days ago

TopamaxSurvivor…I have a Nikon D3000.

-- Every step of each project is considered my masterpiece because I want the finished product to reflect the quality of my work.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10418 posts in 1275 days


#3 posted 1007 days ago

This explains why all my pics of the walnut coffee table look bleached. Good tip. I’ll be exploring this. Thanks for posting this.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

4682 posts in 1427 days


#4 posted 1007 days ago

lighting is a big factor along with quality lenses. digital is fuzzy, optical magnifies light.
Some cameras do blue others more red
I’m using Picasa which allows color and light correction when pic has good content and bad light source

Many pics on LJ’s do not do justice to the pieces

Good luck w/new tool..

:)

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View LittlePaw's profile

LittlePaw

1571 posts in 1663 days


#5 posted 1007 days ago

I noticed you took the 2 pix at different angles. Did you happen to change the lighting when you swap the lenses or change the shutter speed or exposure? Lenses alone should not affect the pix the way they did – lighting and exposure would. For a fair comparison, set the camera on a tripod and just change the lenses leaving all setting unchanged. Then see if there is any difference in the outcome.

-- LittlePAW - The sweetest sound in my shop, next to Mozart, is what a hand plane makes slicing a ribbon.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14552 posts in 2261 days


#6 posted 1007 days ago

There must be some different filters built into the lens. It used to be light, film type, & filters. Looks like digital may be a whole new ballgame ;-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11638 posts in 2273 days


#7 posted 1007 days ago

Seems to be more going on than just the lens.
The lighting / angle is so different you can’t even see the background anymore.
I would say that the first pic looks more realistic for a freshly made Maple box…JMHO : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View Woodwrecker's profile

Woodwrecker

3551 posts in 2160 days


#8 posted 1007 days ago

Wow. They look like two different boxes.

-- Having fun...Eric

View Greg The Cajun Box Sculptor's profile

Greg The Cajun Box Sculptor

4898 posts in 1893 days


#9 posted 1007 days ago

My picture taking is definitely a work in progress and learning experience but the new lens is really nice. All the reviews and info I have read say the lense that comes with the camera is not that good and I guess that makes sense…especially when I see other Nikon lenses that cost as much as a good table saw.
Photography is like anything else in that there is always more to learn and improve…always

-- Every step of each project is considered my masterpiece because I want the finished product to reflect the quality of my work.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14552 posts in 2261 days


#10 posted 1007 days ago

I did a little googling. Didn’t find out much. Nikon says the 35 mm is a warmer lens and lists portraits as a function. Your photos look like one was taken with daylight film and the other with tungsten. I suspect Nikon is doing this with lens coating since we don’t have film options now. My camera, D40, has a white balance for different shooting lights. Guess I’ll have to get it off auto and see what they do. ;-)) I have noticed my digital photos are whiter and brighter than I used to get with film. I always used Kodack 200 or 400, but lots of people prefered Fuji because they thought it was a little warmer; ie, more yellow.

What kind of light did yiou use? Were both taken in the same light?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Greg The Cajun Box Sculptor's profile

Greg The Cajun Box Sculptor

4898 posts in 1893 days


#11 posted 1007 days ago

Topomax, I have one of those photo cubes with several different background cloths. I took the pictures with the photocube set on a folding table outside. They were taken about one minute apart. All I did was change the lens and take the photos with all the same settings. The angle is a little different and I will be using a tripod next time.
I found all my comparison info and reviews on Amazon.com. They seem to have alot of user reviews from both pros and beginners like me.

-- Every step of each project is considered my masterpiece because I want the finished product to reflect the quality of my work.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14552 posts in 2261 days


#12 posted 1007 days ago

I’m a beginner too in digital. I got to where I could capture black ponies in motion indoors on dark dirt with film. That is no small achievement for the typical amateur ;-)), but I think my Nikon D40 will probably do it for me. That is most likely why you are getting such bright pictures with the all purpose lens. I’ll look at amazon. Thanks for the tip. I’m sure they built in color correction in that lens.

One thing you might do is put an A1 daylight filter on your lens. i always to just to protect them. They just change the f stop about 1 point. If you ever drop it or damage it, it is the filter that takes the punishment rather than your lens.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Roger's profile

Roger

13960 posts in 1389 days


#13 posted 1006 days ago

holy cow. I thought they were 2 different boxes

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Kentuk55@bellsouth.net

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1759 days


#14 posted 1006 days ago

He threw on a couple coats of Watco Danish Oil between pictures ;-)

Beautiful box, by the way !

-- -- Neil

View cajunpen's profile

cajunpen

14338 posts in 2651 days


#15 posted 1006 days ago

Greg, your photography skills may be a work in progress – but you damn sure have the box building skills dead on! Pictures are nice, but you have to appreciate the craftsmanship of the box, no matter what the “film color” appears to be. Outstanding talent on both skills, as far as I’m concerned.

Geaux Tigers
Geaux Saints

-- Bill - "Suit yourself and let the rest be pleased." http://www.cajunpen.com/

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