LumberJocks

Jigs and techniques #2: Tenon Jig Measuring Stick

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by GregD posted 1576 days ago 2248 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Cheap & Simple Mortise Jig Part 2 of Jigs and techniques series Part 3: Bandsaw resaw fence »

Here is another “dial indicator on a stick” idea. This one is for making measurements when using a tenoning jig.

BTW, click on the images to see the uncropped originals.

The commercial tenoning jig that I recently bought from Rockler looks like this:

Notice that the sliding base remains above the sub base that is fixed to the miter slot runner. The cut line of the saw blade can be referenced to the edge of this fixed sub base and will not move nor be obstructed regardless of the position of the sliding base.

Here is my typical setup for a tenon. I like to make my shoulder cuts first, but don’t want to play golf, so I use a spacer block to keep the end of my tenon off the table top. This tenoning jig on my saw requires this anyway if the sliding base is more than 3/4” away from the saw blade.

Here is my tenon jig measuring stick.

The end “step” in the stick is thin enough to slide between the table top and the sliding base of the tenoning jig. It is a bit wider than the distance between the edge of the fixed base of the tenoning jig and the cut line of the table saw. The middle “step” in the stick thins the 3/4” scrap I used for the stick so that it is thinner than my spacer block and will clear under the end of the work piece. The fence along the right side of the stick positions the stick consistently relative to the operator side of the fixed base.

A side view of the stick.

I used a #12 flat head wood screw to attach the dial indicator to the stick. A 1/4” wood screw (#14 I believe) might have been better, but I didn’t have one.

Here is the tenon jig measuring stick in use

The dial indicator is zeroed by making a cut with the tenoning jig, positioning the measuring stick like this for a measurement, and then adjusting the dial on the indicator to read “zero”. From that point on you can use the measuring stick to precisely position the cheek of the tenon relative to the face of the workpiece. Since my dial indicator is calibrated for decimal inches, I use a digital caliper with decimal readout for my measurements of the mating workpiece and do the subtraction.

I still get a bit confused reading the “rotation counter” on the dial indicator, so I’m thinking of actually calibrating the generally useless ruler/pointer on the tenoning jig so that it tells me the nearest 0.1”.

It might also be helpful to add a sufficient number of rare earth magnets to the end of the measuring stick to hold it in position during a measurement.

Today I used this measuring stick to cut and fit 16 tenons in mostly fir stock that was thicknessed last week but this week is a variety of thicknesses. Nevertheless, this measuring stick made quick work of fine tuning the tenoning jig for each tenon. I typically spent more time rounding the ends of the tenons to fit into the plunge-routed mortises than I spent getting a snug fit on the tenon thicknesses.

-- Greg D.



6 comments so far

View OutPutter's profile

OutPutter

1194 posts in 2627 days


#1 posted 1575 days ago

Hi Greg,

I appreciate your efforts to post these blogs because I know how much work it can be. I hate to mention this but I think you would want to know since you seem to be targeting beginners. The pictures are fairly hard to follow. It’s either the descriptions you write or the pictures are too close-up. I’m not sure what it is but it’s hard for me to follow what you’re saying. I still don’t understand what the jig looks like because the picture of the whole jig was cut off. I can’t tell how you really use it either because the picture was too close up. Anyway, don’t give up and don’t take my word for this. Thanks for all the effort.

Best,

-- Jim

View GregD's profile

GregD

614 posts in 1773 days


#2 posted 1575 days ago

Jim,

Yes, the default cropping of the pictures on LumberJocks is not always ideal, and I don’t take the time to crop my photos before posting. However, with most web browsers, if you right-click on a picture you will be offered a “view image” option – if you select that you can see the entire image, although only the image.

Greg

-- Greg D.

View Walt M.'s profile

Walt M.

243 posts in 1647 days


#3 posted 1575 days ago

Greg thars a good idea and your right, the right click view image works well.

If you use Windows they have a power toy that you can install on your computer
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/Downloads/powertoys/Xppowertoys.mspx

that will resize your pictures to the required 640×480 size for posting, the download is on the right hand side of the page took me forever to see it.
After installing you just right click on the picture and pic the size you want and it automatically makes a copy that is what ever size you chose works pretty good.

Hope to see more blog entries on the jigs

View OutPutter's profile

OutPutter

1194 posts in 2627 days


#4 posted 1575 days ago

Thanks for the reply Greg. It’s just that most people don’t like clicking those pictures because you never know when you’re going to end best friends with a cultural minister from a small African country who needs you to help launder the money. Know what I mean? Anyway, if you do decide to reduce the size of your pictures to 800×600 (I think that’s the largest size for LJ Walt), there will be no cropping necessary nor any clicking. Flicker can do that for you I believe.

PS – I don’t get any “view image” when I right click in IE8.

-- Jim

View GregD's profile

GregD

614 posts in 1773 days


#5 posted 1574 days ago

Sorry Jim. I like IE so much I almost never use it. The photos above are now links to their sources so you can just click on them to see the whole photo.

Thanks for the hint, Walt, but at home I’m mostly a Linux user.

I’ll think about the cropping issue for my next post.

-- Greg D.

View OutPutter's profile

OutPutter

1194 posts in 2627 days


#6 posted 1574 days ago

Thanks Greg. It was definitely the pictures that made it hard to follow. Remember to think 800×600 on your next upload to Photobucket. I still don’t need any new business partners from Nilibgeria. ;-)

-- Jim

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase