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Shop Tricks and Tips

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Blog entry by GaryK posted 11-20-2007 12:19 PM 5767 reads 30 times favorited 84 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I thought I would start a blog for shop tricks and tips.

We all learn things just as a matter of course. Why not share some of your favorites.

Here’s one I learned a long time ago. I just used it a little while ago and that’s what got this going.

Suppose you have a piece you are cutting to length for a perfect fit. Not thight not loose but perfect.
Say a piece of trim for something. Well, if you are like me you cut it a little long and nibble away at it
until it’s perfect. This trick is how to get those last tiny tiny cuts.

What I do is, with the table saw blade stopped, I move my miter gauge with the work piece to the
middle of the blade behind the teeth. Then I slide it until it touches the body of the blade, then
pull the miter gauge with the work piece back in front of the blade. The blade will flex enough to
allow you to get past the teeth.

Then turn the saw on and make your cut. The cut should be equal to the half the difference between the
thicker tooth and the body of the blade which is usually about .010 inches.

A couple of those and you’ve got the perfect length.

Gary

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX



84 comments so far

View cajunpen's profile

cajunpen

14416 posts in 2790 days


#1 posted 11-20-2007 12:23 PM

Thanks for the tip Gary. I think this is going to be a very interesting thread, I’m looking forward to seeing it get rolling. Now, i have to think of a “post worthy” tip.

-- Bill - "Suit yourself and let the rest be pleased." http://www.cajunpen.com/

View miles125's profile

miles125

2179 posts in 2730 days


#2 posted 11-20-2007 12:39 PM

I guess my tip would be keep a spray bottle of WD40 handy to keep the wood sliding easy on all machinery. I like it because i’ve never had a problem with it interfering with the finish.

-- "The way to make a small fortune in woodworking- start with a large one"

View Sawdust2's profile

Sawdust2

1467 posts in 2812 days


#3 posted 11-20-2007 12:56 PM

Works on chop saws, too.

-- No piece is cut too short. It was meant for a smaller project.

View Russel's profile

Russel

2199 posts in 2663 days


#4 posted 11-20-2007 01:04 PM

Like you Gary, I will often measure once and cut alot. I’m much more confident sneaking up on those type of cuts. When I get real close though, I typically use my small disc sander to fine tune the fit. Just a touch of the piece to the disc takes the tiniest bit off. I’ve also found that the sander is good for fine tuning miters as well.

-- Working at Woodworking http://www.VillageLaneFurniture.com

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4438 posts in 2687 days


#5 posted 11-20-2007 02:38 PM

That’s the way I sneak up on mitered corners on trim. I do it with my miter slider on the table saw. In front of the fence on the miter slider, I use Porter-Cable self-adhesive sand paper to keep the work pieces from sliding while I cut. I also use it on the front of the sliding miter gauge I built for the router table fence.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View oscorner's profile

oscorner

4564 posts in 3035 days


#6 posted 11-20-2007 06:19 PM

Thanks for the tip! ;^)

-- Jesus is Lord!

View Cathy Krumrei's profile

Cathy Krumrei

364 posts in 2911 days


#7 posted 11-20-2007 07:00 PM

I know one! When I do use glue it’s a pain to use brushes etc and I really don’t care to have to clean up anything. So what I do is use the pieces of plastic that comes with tool boxes or tackle boxes that you have extra. Then just throw them away.
Krum

View TomFran's profile

TomFran

2942 posts in 2718 days


#8 posted 11-20-2007 08:52 PM

Gary,

This is a good tip. I’m sure of some of us could work with some of you “seasoned” woodworkers, we could learn a whole lot!

This is one of my favorite woodworking topics. I hope you can give us a bunch of “tricks and tips.”

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 2713 days


#9 posted 11-20-2007 10:17 PM

Here’s another on of my favorites:

There is a very old method of clamping that you don’t see mentioned anymore. They are called Go-Bars.
See the pictures for how they are used. They are worth a thousand words.

It’s basically a thin stick that you can make as needed. You need something for the stick to push against like
the ceiling. This an example of how I glued in the soundboard on my harpsichord. You need a lot of clamps for this.

The thicker the stick and the closer it is to being straightened increases the force. You could easily get 100+ pounds of force per clamp. Make sure that you use a cawl to protect your project.

Try it, you will be surprised how good they work, and how much force they have.

Here you can see that you can build your own platform.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View TomFran's profile

TomFran

2942 posts in 2718 days


#10 posted 11-20-2007 11:13 PM

Now that is cool! What a trick!

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

View Dan'um Style's profile

Dan'um Style

13181 posts in 2707 days


#11 posted 11-20-2007 11:51 PM

guess I’ll get some wd-40 and the clamping stick trick is cool too !

-- keeping myself entertained ... Humor and fun lubricate the brain

View Dan'um Style's profile

Dan'um Style

13181 posts in 2707 days


#12 posted 11-21-2007 05:21 AM

learned a new trick from a man who owns a stained glass factory and restoration business.

dark paste wax and heat gun

-- keeping myself entertained ... Humor and fun lubricate the brain

View cheller's profile

cheller

254 posts in 2833 days


#13 posted 11-21-2007 06:09 PM

old cds (I work in IT and we have lots of cds from old software) work as very effective glue spreaders

-- Chelle http://artsgranddaughter.blogspot.com

View DaveJ's profile

DaveJ

71 posts in 2647 days


#14 posted 11-21-2007 09:08 PM

Grain viewer. (I doubt that this is original, but I don’t recall where I might have seen it.)

Grain orientation and quality are part of the criteria when laying out a cutting pattern. To help select the optimal layout, cut one or more viewing windows the size of your parts and lay them on top of the candidate boards. Slide the viewer(s) around to test different areas and combinations.

PB210379

-- Dave J. Eagle, ID

View Dan'um Style's profile

Dan'um Style

13181 posts in 2707 days


#15 posted 11-21-2007 11:41 PM

the heat gun pushes the wax around and makes it easy to shine, it melts into the cracks, joints and gaps.

I like glues and finishes that dry fast !

TIP: add japanese dryer to oil stains. makes a 6-10 dry time more like 2 hours.

I like polyurethane glues because the easy cleanup and stainability etc. Titebond poly was my favorite
now I use Rhino glue. Faster drying and doesn’t expand as much. Less mess etc.

-- keeping myself entertained ... Humor and fun lubricate the brain

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