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TV Stand #3: Moving along...gluing corners, cutting bottom and shelf.

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Blog entry by Angela posted 981 days ago 1322 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Making the front face frame... Next Step..... Ideas Welcomed Part 3 of TV Stand series Part 4: Bottom and Shelf added »

In planning to glue to corners I cut some angle blocks to assist in holding the clamps in place.

I also used a special clamp for angles that I highly recommend if you have to glue up unusual corners or large miter corners.

I then tried to figure out how to cut the bottom and shelf. I decided to use my circular saw. Before having a table saw, I used a circular saw to cut the wood so I have a good blade for plywood. I also own a forrest blade but I didn’t use it for this, don’t ask me why because I don’t know.

I first designed a circular saw cutting jig. The jig allows me to know exactly where the blade will cut. I marked the angles on the bottom by placing the side and front pieces on top of the wood. I then marked the angles.

I cut the angles on one side then placed the side and front back on top of the wood and marked the other side. Maybe I should have done this differently since there’s a little problem now. (see below)

I cut the bottom piece to size. I then cut the shelf piece the same way. I used the bottom piece to mark the shelf piece so the angles would be exact.

I stopped here to think what I want to do next.

I must have done something wrong because the angle on the back of one of the side pieces is perfect 90 degrees but the other side is a little off. It might be because the side pieces glued up slightly different and threw it off. I’m not sure.

Now I’m not sure if I’m going to make the back piece or attach the bottom or glue the front onto the sides.

A comment I received from LJ member GregD mentioned securing the bottom board and shelf with the Kreg pocket hole system. I actually never thought of this but I think it will work perfect. I won’t have to use support blocks because I’ve used the Kreg screws on the back piece of a project I made where I made a mistake on the measurements and it was the only method I could use. I was amazed how strong it was. I never thought about using Kreg screws to assemble this project but it should work great. Also Amazon.com has 1000 1-1/4” course screws for $22.50.

Feel free to add your two cents, tell me how you would have done something different or even what to do next.

Angela

-- www.WoodWorkersWebsite.com - Helping other woodworker's



4 comments so far

View GregD's profile

GregD

570 posts in 1637 days


#1 posted 981 days ago

My experience seems to be that the glue-up process introduces a lot of variability in the final result. Even if the parts are cut accurately you still need to plan your glue-up process so the assembly “lands” where it is supposed to. With good quality bar clamps I have been impressed at how much I can pull my assemblies into – or out of – square while keeping the joints acceptably tight. So whenever I need something to land precisely a certain way I put stuff in my glue-up procedure to force that outcome. I probably would have clamped the side pieces to the shelves during the glue up.

Do I understand the pictures correctly? It looks like on one side the front edge of the shelf lands 3/8” proud and on the other it is 1/16” short. If you get a good fit between the shelf and the sides otherwise, I’d just recut the front edge so it isn’t proud on the one side. If you want to get fussy, rip a thin strip of face frame material and glue it on the front edge of your shelf so it is proud on both sides. The gap will then be eliminated when you mark/recut the front edge. Since it will be quite thin, sanding it flush (before assembly) should be a simple task.

Once the shelves fit I would drill out the pocket holes. Then clamp together the sides and shelves. I would rip spacers the same width as the distance from the bottom edge of the sides and the bottom surface of the bottom shelf. I’d clamp these in place and add a couple of clamps to pull the bottom shelf firmly against them. I’d also rip some spacers the same width as the distance from the top surface of the bottom shelf and the bottom surface of the middle shelf. Clamp those spacers in place and put the middle shelf firmly on top of that. Use your band clamp (two if you have them) to pull the assembly together. Where ever you can see to do it, add clamps to force parts (the shelves) into the proper location. Remember that the pocket screws are going to want to push the joint apart before pulling it together, and the more tightly you have the parts clamped the less this can throw off your assembly. I try to minimize this by running my drill on a very slow speed when driving the pocket screws, but even then they still try to force apart the joint. You also want the assembly firmly on a flat surface so you don’t introduce a twist. To avoid any chance of strip-out I don’t seat the screws using the drill, I do that by hand.

Looks good!

-- Greg D. -- the price of freedom is tolerance

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GregD

570 posts in 1637 days


#2 posted 981 days ago

BTW, the splined bevels turned out great, from what I can see. Getting those tight was probably the most important thing to accomplish during the glue up.

-- Greg D. -- the price of freedom is tolerance

View Angela's profile

Angela

205 posts in 1397 days


#3 posted 981 days ago

I probably would have clamped the side pieces to the shelves during the glue up.

This would have been a good idea but since this is new to me I didn’t think of it. I used the sides to determine the shelf size but if it wasn’t already cut I would do it differently. I’d cut the shelf to size and attach it all at once.

Do I understand the pictures correctly? It looks like on one side the front edge of the shelf lands 3/8” proud and on the other it is 1/16” short.

It’s actually the back and not the front so it won’t show. The front fits great so it’s not that big of a deal since I’m the only one that will ever see the back and so I’m the only one that knows what’s going on back there.

Use your band clamp (two if you have them) to pull the assembly together. Where ever you can see to do it, add clamps to force parts (the shelves) into the proper location. Remember that the pocket screws are going to want to push the joint apart before pulling it together, and the more tightly you have the parts clamped the less this can throw off your assembly. I try to minimize this by running my drill on a very slow speed when driving the pocket screws, but even then they still try to force apart the joint. You also want the assembly firmly on a flat surface so you don’t introduce a twist. To avoid any chance of strip-out I don’t seat the screws using the drill, I do that by hand.

It’s funny because I stopped for the day and order another band clamp because I only have one. I’d like to use three of them but didn’t want to purchase 2 more so I just got one. I’ll get it tomorrow.

I was worried about installing the screws and the force on the glued joint. Thanks for the ideas. I was throwing around a bunch of different ideas of ways to attach the pocket screws while still keeping everything together. I’ll use the spacers too.

I’m planning on attaching the bottom and the shelf then worry about fixing the back. I’m not sure what will happen with the back once I install the pocket screws so I’ll wait and see then determine what I’ll do with the back.

I try to minimize this by running my drill on a very slow speed when driving the pocket screws…To avoid any chance of strip-out I don’t seat the screws using the drill, I do that by hand.

Good idea. I’ve had trouble with plywood and the screws just turning so the hand thing is a good idea.

Thanks again for your time
Angela

-- www.WoodWorkersWebsite.com - Helping other woodworker's

View GregD's profile

GregD

570 posts in 1637 days


#4 posted 980 days ago

If the pilot hole of the pocket hole could be extended into the mating piece of the joint, driving the screw would not, I think, try to push the joint apart.

-- Greg D. -- the price of freedom is tolerance

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