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A non-plywood 4 drawer filing cabinet #4: The reveal

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Blog entry by GCM posted 04-13-2015 07:35 AM 1548 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: The build Part 4 of A non-plywood 4 drawer filing cabinet series no next part

The finished project:

The finish on this project is shop made country/shabby chic using chalk paint made from cheap flat ceiling paint tinted with even cheaper poster paints, mixed with not-so-cheap calcium carbonate, and shop made finishing past wax made from a chunk of bees wax and boiled linseed oil.

One coat of Ivory chalk paint, 2 coats of Cyan chalk paint (first coat epic fail due to miscalculation of amount required), and 2 coats of finishing wax after sanding and distressing.

Note: I would have preferred all black hardware but couldn’t source it. I may go back and paint it black but as the hardware is all solid brass (not cheap) I am a little loath to do that.

All in all the objective was achieved, an all solid wood (mainly premium pine) 4 draw filing cabinet (one draw is actually a stationery cabinet). The use of reclaimed pine lining helped keep costs under control. Not a skerrick of plywood in the whole thing, and, most importantly, no fat, greedy, lazy, rip-off merchant plywood supplier was involved or fed during the whole of this project ;-) Oh! and the same can be said of paint suppliers too!.

Only 2 more to go!

-- Make things as simple as possible, but no simpler.



5 comments so far

View handsawgeek's profile

handsawgeek

591 posts in 862 days


#1 posted 04-13-2015 02:11 PM

That is one cool build! Nice work!

-- Ed

View eccentrictinkerer's profile

eccentrictinkerer

38 posts in 2495 days


#2 posted 04-15-2015 03:25 AM

Beautiful cabinet!

BTW, how large is a skerrick? ;-)

I wanted vintage hardware for my linen closet when I repainted my hallway. (My home is 100 years old in June!)

I found bright brass cup handles and a latch, expensive, but they looked cheap.

I soaked the parts for several days in stripper to remove powder coating then buffed them up on a soft wire wheel.

I tried Rockler’s aging solution, but didn’t get the results I wanted. Then I Googled!


I wound up fuming the parts in ammonia. I suspended each part on a hook hanging from the plastic lid of a coffee can 1/5 filled with ammonia. I set the can in a laundry tub with 2” of very hot water for 15 minutes and got exactly the finish I wanted. (After many trials and more errors). SWMBO and I are very happy with the results.

View GCM's profile

GCM

86 posts in 1793 days


#3 posted 04-15-2015 04:38 AM



That is one cool build! Nice work!

- handsawgeek

Thanks Ed!

-- Make things as simple as possible, but no simpler.

View GCM's profile

GCM

86 posts in 1793 days


#4 posted 04-15-2015 04:45 AM



Beautiful cabinet!
- eccentrictinkerer

Thanks :-)

BTW, how large is a skerrick? ;-)

- eccentrictinkerer

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/skerrick

;-)

I wound up fuming the parts in ammonia. I suspended each part on a hook hanging from the plastic lid of a coffee can 1/5 filled with ammonia. I set the can in a laundry tub with 2” of very hot water for 15 minutes and got exactly the finish I wanted. (After many trials and more errors). SWMBO and I are very happy with the results.

- eccentrictinkerer

What an amazing tip! Only 15 minutes? – it seems to good to be true!

I will definitely be trying that.

I assume that only works with brass?

-- Make things as simple as possible, but no simpler.

View erm's profile

erm

6 posts in 603 days


#5 posted 04-17-2015 02:18 AM

nice

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