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A new life for a 1/4HP motor... is going to be a diy lathe! #1: first steps

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Blog entry by FreddyS posted 06-21-2011 05:56 PM 3618 reads 3 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of A new life for a 1/4HP motor... is going to be a diy lathe! series Part 2: change of plan, now a diy lathe and some parts for it »

Hi everyone, so I got this motor from a friend like 15 years ago, it was adapted to work as an airbrush compressor but it was not used any more.

Now I decided to recycle it and use it to power some diy machines at the tiny shop.

First I got a drill chuck, and a friend with a metal lathe made an adapter for it:

Looking good, but the paint job is lousy …

So I decided to clean the motor and paint it, while sanding it I found a tag with the motor specs. well buried behind some paint layers, that’s how I knew it’s a 1/4HP motor hehee.

And it looks like this is the fourth time this motor is recycled judging by the previous paint layers in it:

Original color: militar green

crappy silver paint job

crappy blue paint job

and finally, red!

Sanding done:

Primer layer done:

Paint finished:

Now it looks better, but as always, murphy law comes in…

I tested with a drill bit and found out the motor shaft oscillates almost 1mm, not good to be used with the chuck installed in it and doesn’t look like there’s an easy way to replace the bearings, or find new ones anyway.

So, I’ll go with a couple of ball bearing pillow blocks, another shaft and some pulleys to work around this, at least this way I’ll be able to do some more machine adaptations, here are some ideas:

- the original idea, spindle sander, a friend told me it may not be a good idea as the bearings are made for horizontal use, not vertical, any thoughts?

- Small wood lathe, which could have some extra jigs to work as any of the next ideas

- Disc sander

- Horizontal drum sander

- Horizontal drill for mortises

Any extra ideas are welcome!

A little update:

The cover plate for the wire connections was missing so I made one, and replaced both plates screws:

-- Learning one thing at a time



9 comments so far

View JL7's profile

JL7

7414 posts in 1689 days


#1 posted 06-21-2011 07:04 PM

Hey Freddy – I have a similar motor setup and use it for buffing and sanding…...details here.

Jeff

-- Jeff - I have not failed. I've just found 10,002 ways that won't work.

View FreddyS's profile

FreddyS

200 posts in 1498 days


#2 posted 06-21-2011 07:27 PM

Hi Jeff, buffing and sanding added to the list :)

-- Learning one thing at a time

View stilldking's profile

stilldking

3 posts in 1621 days


#3 posted 06-21-2011 07:29 PM

You could use it to turn a flex-shaft. (A little less than portable, but that would take away the wobble from your work.)
Nice work on the motor BTW.

JC
Glenburn, ND

-- "There are 10 types of people in the world, those that understand binary and those that don't."

View mafe's profile

mafe

9621 posts in 1813 days


#4 posted 06-21-2011 08:32 PM

Argghh Murphy.

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3193 posts in 1399 days


#5 posted 06-22-2011 03:35 AM

A word of caution. We were taught in the air force that you don’t paint motors. It supposedly makes them overheat. Just what they told us. Of course they probably told us cleaning latrines was fun too!

View peteg's profile

peteg

2978 posts in 1547 days


#6 posted 06-22-2011 09:16 AM

Locking screws on the shaft adaptor means that you have a “sloppy ” ( I mean 000’s”) fit meaning the smallest movement will translate to oscillation of some sort, transpose that thru a screw thread & a chuck thread all from differing scources and you will undoubtably have movement thru 3 mechanical fixings / attachments, this is probably why the old guys used to run thru a double ended bearing set and transfered the drive to a balanced shaft, might be worth a look at :)))
BTW, good ventilation thru the winding should negate any “paint job” the casing, ost motors came with a coat of paint from new

-- Pete G: If you always do what you always did you'll always get what you always got

View FreddyS's profile

FreddyS

200 posts in 1498 days


#7 posted 06-22-2011 05:22 PM

Thanks for the tip Grandpa, I think I’ll be safe as the motor appears to have good ventilation, and will be used only in hobby levels… unless I get more obsessed with woodworking hehee.

Hi Pete, yes, I didn’t thought about the oscillation until I found it, I ‘ll go with the balanced shaft so it should not be a problem in the end.

-- Learning one thing at a time

View EEngineer's profile

EEngineer

906 posts in 2337 days


#8 posted 06-22-2011 05:48 PM

- the original idea, spindle sander, a friend told me it may not be a good idea as the bearings are made for horizontal use, not vertical, any thoughts?

Nonsense! I have a vertical drum sander like this that I’ve used for years. I’ll see if I can post a picture later. The only problem I have with it is that sawdust tends to drop directly into the motor. I just blow it out with the compressor once in a while.

Oddly enough, I just used an drum sanding adapter on the motor shaft for it too. No detectable wobble. I just had to shim the mounting bracket to get it exactly perpendicular to the table.

-- "Find out what you cannot do and then go do it!"

View FreddyS's profile

FreddyS

200 posts in 1498 days


#9 posted 06-22-2011 07:04 PM

Hi EEngineer, nice to know, please post the picture ;)

The wobble in this case starts from the shaft itself, I guesstimate this motor is at least 20 years old and some wearing is showing, or maybe some hard hit made the shaft unbalanced.

“I just used an drum sanding adapter on the motor shaft for it too”, can’t be simpler than that isn’t it? I went with the drill chuck so I could replace de drum sanding pieces easily, maybe I should try anyway :).

-- Learning one thing at a time

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