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Again with the Dutch tool chest... #5: Done! (almost)

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Blog entry by Fraxinus posted 09-25-2016 02:57 AM 1418 reads 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Paint it black Part 5 of Again with the Dutch tool chest... series no next part

Spent pretty much all day today finishing up the tool chest. I finished painting it and scrubbed everything with a green pad to blend in the paint. I really liked how the milk paint looked, so I decided against boiled linseed oil. It’s black black black, almost sucks in the light since there’s nearly no sheen. Some of the pictures make it look lighter and much chalkier than it does in person.

After the paint was done, I reinstalled the hinges, this time taking great care to get everything squared up. Went smoothly.

Then I installed the handles. I got these on eBay, they were advertised as antique hand made. They definitely look both. They’re not quite the same size, the holes aren’t quite centered, one of the loops is a bit smaller than the other, etc. I think of this as character. The rivets on the back stuck out, so I had to cut out tiny little mortises for the handles to sit flush on the side.

The handles went on without problem. I then did the hasp. Another eBay purchase, but this was newly manufactured. I had a choice between powder finish and rust. I chose rust. True to the description, the hasp was quite rusty. Last night I brushed some Klean-Strip Phosphoric Prep & Etch on it. I’m impressed with this stuff, I’ve only used it a couple times but it works surprisingly fast, is easy to apply, and doesn’t require a full dunking like vinegar. The Prep and Etch knocked off almost all the rust but left a nice patina. I gave the hasp a quick brushing with a bronze wire brush, then wiped with oil. It matched the hinges and the handles almost exactly.

I had to chop a mortise for half of the hasp, which I did with a chisel. I used a Stanley 71 router plane at first, but it was too big to get to the bottom, the iron kept hitting the sides. The mortise turned out good, I’m happy with the fit. The router plane damaged the paint on the edges, so I touched it up later.

I wasn’t sure I was going to add a hasp, but I’m glad I did. I really like the way it looks, and it might come in handy to be able to lock the chest if I ever take a class. I’m going to have to get an antique-style padlock for it.

Aside from the saw till that I’m going to screw to the inside of the lid, the chest is done. Yay!

Of course I couldn’t wait to put my tools in it.

The chest weighs almost exactly 90 lbs when full of tools. I forgot to weigh it before I filled it. It’s not the most comfortable thing in the world to carry, certainly wouldn’t want to walk up several flights of stairs with it. If I ever have to carry it a fair distance, I’ll use a hand truck.

The only thing left is the lid saw till for my 18” and 22” Disston panel saws. I was going to make a till that sits on the inside for my Japanese razor saw and ryoba, but I’m not sure now. There’s not really enough room for both saws, so I may just leave the razor saw in there loose.

Overall I’m very happy with how the chest turned out. I tried a lot of new things and made a fair number of mistakes on this project, which I will hopefully learn from. I definitely feel like my hand tool skills improved over the course of the build.

I don’t have a good table to keep the chest on, just an ugly little “temporary” table that has managed to stay in use much longer than intended. I plan on making a base for the chest, probably on casters, though I have a couple other projects that are higher priority. I can’t fit all of my tools in this chest, and I’m constantly acquiring more (damn eBay), so it’ll be nice to have another small chest for tools I don’t use much.



8 comments so far

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

1993 posts in 1731 days


#1 posted 09-25-2016 03:39 AM

Nicely done—looks great!’

Way too heavy for an old guy like me!

-- just rjR

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

13733 posts in 2083 days


#2 posted 09-25-2016 11:25 AM

Looks hreat, and I like the interior arrangement too. Congrats on your new Dutch Chest!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View theoldfart's profile (online now)

theoldfart

8121 posts in 1916 days


#3 posted 09-25-2016 04:42 PM

Really looks good. I bought a folding hand truck to move mine since I take it to a class every week.

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

13733 posts in 2083 days


#4 posted 09-25-2016 06:15 PM

^ And then Kevin hangs out with us, here on LJs, when he has no class… :-)

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View theoldfart's profile (online now)

theoldfart

8121 posts in 1916 days


#5 posted 09-25-2016 08:49 PM

^ i resemble that remark!

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

View theoldfart's profile (online now)

theoldfart

8121 posts in 1916 days


#6 posted 09-25-2016 11:32 PM

Frax, I do have a question. If this is to be portable, i would be concerned about the saw plates exposed in the lower compartment getting beaten up by the loose planes and parts. I have built in holds for most of my tools to avoid collisions since sometimes i am less than nimble moving the chest around. Any plans in that direction?

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

View Fraxinus's profile

Fraxinus

25 posts in 196 days


#7 posted 09-26-2016 01:52 AM

Thanks for the encouragement guys. I only started woodworking in January, it feels good to build something halfway decent.

Old Fart, I did see the potential for problems with the saw plates sticking through the bottom, but I don’t plan on hauling this thing around. It will live on its table/base in the shop 99.9% of the time. I rent the house I’m in and seem to move every few years, so I’m building my shop to be semi-portable.

I live in rural Oregon pretty far from any woodworking schools, but if I ever do take a class I’ll likely just cover the saw plates with a towel to keep the planes from sliding into them. I might also line the back of the chest with leather or cloth to keep the handles from getting worn as I slide them in and out, though I’m not sure this will be necessary.

I stole the saw holder idea from She Works Wood, who did a good blog series on her build of the Dutch tool chest. I figured if I don’t like it, I can always rearrange things. The tool tills are just screwed in, no glue.

View Tugboater78's profile

Tugboater78

2447 posts in 1656 days


#8 posted 09-27-2016 08:21 AM

Looks great! I love my dutch chest, aure is great for keeping all the tools in place.

-- "....put that handsaw to work and make it earn its keep. - summerfi" <==< JuStiN >==>=->

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