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Cyanoacrylate wood finish?

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Blog entry by FrankLad posted 07-24-2009 05:10 PM 16151 reads 18 times favorited 23 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I thought “What if I coated the whole ring in cyanoacrylate finish?”

...and I tried it.

The rings have since been through regular everyday wear including dishwashings, handwashings and showers.

END RESULT: This finish is holding up better than both Waterlox and Arm-R-Seal. And, in my opinion, it actually looks better.

CAVEATS: Obviously, this would be difficult to do on anything but very small woodworking projects. It’s just right for these wooden rings, but would be difficult to apply for a table finish. LOL!

Here’s a pic of a Wenge ring with the cyanoacrylate finish applied:
Wenge Ring

Golden Koa ring:
Golden Koa Ring

I’m curious to know what you guys think about this.

-- Frank, Mississippi, Handcrafted wooden rings - http://www.bentwoodrings.com



23 comments so far

View TedM's profile

TedM

2002 posts in 2422 days


#1 posted 07-24-2009 05:56 PM

Frank, as I understand it many penturners use a CA finish on their pens for durability. The key is to build successive thin layers instead of one thick layer to aid in drying and offset the chance for it clouding. Also popular is a CA and BLO combination.

btw, the rings look great!

-- I'm a wood magician... I can turn fine lumber into firewood before your very eyes! - Please visit http://www.woodworkersguide.com and sign up for my project updates!

View SouthpawCA's profile

SouthpawCA

254 posts in 1922 days


#2 posted 07-24-2009 05:57 PM

The rings look awesome!!! The CA really pops the grain. I’ve heard of putting a CA finish on pens which look great. There was a “how to” article doing this same treatment on pens in Woodturning Design in the Spring 2004 issue. I’ve wanted to try it, just haven’t gotten back to the lathe. There are just too many inspirations on this site.

-- Don

View FrankLad's profile

FrankLad

270 posts in 1999 days


#3 posted 07-24-2009 07:18 PM

TedM: Thank you! Would the clouding be similar to the “blooming” that CA is known for, or would it be comparable to how an epoxy will cloud/go chalky over time? That CA and BLO combination sounds interesting. Does it affect adhesion adversely? I wonder if a CA and Walnut Oil combo would work. ????

SouthpawCA: Thank you! It does pop the grain very well. I’ll see if I can find that article or something similar. You are right about the inspirations on this site. I’ve seen so many wonderful projects from some talented folks. It’s where I come to get a nice dose of daily woodworking inspiration! :)

-- Frank, Mississippi, Handcrafted wooden rings - http://www.bentwoodrings.com

View Will Mego's profile

Will Mego

307 posts in 2402 days


#4 posted 07-24-2009 08:02 PM

very cool to see some pics of the finish. I’d read of it before, but never really gotten a chance to see what it would look like. As mentioned above, I’d heard of it on pens and other small projects, but I’m wondering about it’s use on a mallet. The difficult part would be the application, but considering how many years I’ve had gluing amazingly tiny things together as a fencer (very small parts inside the tip assembly) I think applying many coats of a very thin finish of CA glue should be within my grasp..as long as I don’t glue said grasp to said tool.

-- "That which has in itself the greatest use, possesses the greatest beauty." - http://www.willmego.com/

View TedM's profile

TedM

2002 posts in 2422 days


#5 posted 07-24-2009 09:33 PM

Frank, yes, ‘blooming’ or ‘frosting’ is the ‘cloudy’ look that sometimes occurs during a slower drying process. This effect can be reduced by minimizing the amount of CA applied, or applying a CA accelerator, thereby speeding up the curing time so that it “polymerizes before it can volatize”.

Here’s a link to one penturner’s procedure for applying CA/BLO to a pen in which he also suspects the acceptable use of Walnut Oil:

http://content.penturners.org/articles/2004/ca-blo.pdf

-- I'm a wood magician... I can turn fine lumber into firewood before your very eyes! - Please visit http://www.woodworkersguide.com and sign up for my project updates!

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5435 posts in 2275 days


#6 posted 07-24-2009 09:48 PM

I have a dvd of a guy making pens he uses this method I tried it and it didn’t work for me maybe I am not doing it right LOL Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View Hix's profile

Hix

161 posts in 1967 days


#7 posted 07-25-2009 01:09 AM

I’ve used it on pens and bottle stoppers for a while now. It is a durable finish and with a little practice, easy to master. The key is practice. If you ask 1000 turners who use a CA finish you will get 1001 replies so if you decide to try it, stick with it for a while because it can be frustrating. You can also glue your fingers together or glue them to the lathe (so I hear).

-- ---call me---- Mark

View FrankLad's profile

FrankLad

270 posts in 1999 days


#8 posted 07-25-2009 01:31 AM

REALLY appreciate all the info, guys!

I think I hit it right with my first attempt, mostly because I only did the outside and it was quite easy to do … small surface area helped too. The inside of the rings is another story. This MXBON 105 cures nearbout instantly, it seems. Have to move blazingly fast. ...or I can rig up something to spin inside the ring… should be easy to come up with.

I’m thinking about trying some Walnut+CA to see how that goes, as opposed to CA first, then buffing over with Walnut.

Will: LOL! I’d be curious to hear back on how that goes if you do it! I bet it would look nice! I find myself thinking about what other projects I could use the CA on. One drawback is the cost… coating these rings is one thing, but bigger projects is another.

TedM: Thanks for the info and that link! I’ve got it open in another window now, about to read…

Scotsman: From what I’ve read, it seems to have a high failure/frustration rate. I haven’t seen that yet but like I said – I think the small size of these things really helps. I’d say pens would have to be at least 10x more difficult. ;)

Hix: Ouch! Glued to the lathe? ...while moving? :(

-- Frank, Mississippi, Handcrafted wooden rings - http://www.bentwoodrings.com

View Danation's profile

Danation

6 posts in 1897 days


#9 posted 08-14-2009 12:56 AM

I’ve actually been doing this for years on my wood rings. As you’ve experienced, if you do it right, it’s an extremely smooth durable, and glossy finish.

I’ve been wearing two woods rings pretty frequently. One for about 2 years, and one for about 1 year. On the edges, the CA has worn off a little, particularly on the first. But it’s pretty easy to refinish them. And 2 years it quite durable for a wood ring’s finish.

-- -Dan

View FrankLad's profile

FrankLad

270 posts in 1999 days


#10 posted 08-14-2009 03:32 AM

It’s great to hear how well yours have held up for that length of time, Danation!

I’ve started using thicker viscosity for the slower cure time, making things a lot easier than with the thin stuff.

Went swimming in a creek while wearing my ring this past weekend. Never second-guessed it; I just keep it on all the time. :)

-- Frank, Mississippi, Handcrafted wooden rings - http://www.bentwoodrings.com

View Danation's profile

Danation

6 posts in 1897 days


#11 posted 08-17-2009 06:51 PM

Yeah, CA is absolutely the way to go for wood rings.

Your rings look quite good. I have to say I was quite shocked to see that somebody else is creating the same type of rings that I’ve been making (i.e. bending the wood to eliminate the end-grain problem and finishing with CA.)

Sometimes it’s a small world after all :)

-- -Dan

View FrankLad's profile

FrankLad

270 posts in 1999 days


#12 posted 08-17-2009 07:19 PM

Thanks, Danation!

Yeah, I almost gave up on bentwood style rings. It was the first method I attempted, and it was frustrating. Then I went more for the laminate-cut rings, as they are really easy to mix different layers and achieve an inlay look with.

I eventually moved back to the bentwood style and was finally able to develop a decent workflow. It’s certainly not a fast/high-volume kind of deal, but I don’t really want/need for it to be… and I’m thinking that’s how it is for any bentwood ring maker…

David Finch from Canada (“Touch Wood Rings”) has been making them since 1999. His prices start at $400. Gustav Reyes (“Simply Wood Rings”), from Chicago, also makes (or “made”... not sure if he’s still into them) some nice bentwood rings. ...around the $250 or so price range.

Do you sell your rings or have an online gallery, Danation?

-- Frank, Mississippi, Handcrafted wooden rings - http://www.bentwoodrings.com

View Danation's profile

Danation

6 posts in 1897 days


#13 posted 08-20-2009 02:44 AM

You can tell me Dan :)

First, I tried the block method, when I was about 14 years old. Then I tried different laminate-type methods. I pretty much came to the same conclusion you mentioned on your website.

I finally “discovered” the bentwood style a few years ago. I though it was quite original, but it looks like I was mistaken. It makes sense, though. It’s the best way to make a strong, beautiful wood ring. I should have realized more people would think of it.

Right now, I’m working right now to get an inventory of rings and set up my website. That’s how I discovered this site: I was searching to see if anybody else did CA finish.

At first, I was a little disappointed to know that I’m not alone, but after thinking about it…. there’s still a very wide market for this that isn’t even close to being saturated, so I’m sure we’ll both do fine.

Do you normally do yours by hand or do you lathe them?

-- -Dan

View FrankLad's profile

FrankLad

270 posts in 1999 days


#14 posted 08-20-2009 03:00 AM

I agree – there aren’t very many doing them this way… it is still very much a wide-open market.

The issue is with all the really inexpensive, cheaply-made wooden rings people see on Ebay and elsewhere. ...one reason I’m trying to educate about “bentwood” rings on my website.

Mine are all crafted totally by hand; No lathe or drill press. The first ones (laminate-cut) were done with a hand drill, but I no longer offer those.

-- Frank, Mississippi, Handcrafted wooden rings - http://www.bentwoodrings.com

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112325 posts in 2266 days


#15 posted 08-20-2009 05:42 AM

unique Idea looks super

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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