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Picking up steam... #1: New tools, new skills, happier days

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Blog entry by ForestGrl posted 08-07-2015 06:14 AM 1140 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Picking up steam... series Part 2: Jazz and Woodturning »

Well, it’s finally happened—I can walk up to the lathe and not feel like a total stranger. Had a mission to make a wine stopper for a friend in Eastern Washington as a thank-you present, put the finish on it today. Then I free-hand sharpened a couple of tools (free-hand! wheeee) and proceeded to practice a little hollowing in endgrain and working with the skew. Actually succeeded in using the skew left-handed. OMG! never thought it would work.

Picked up a set of Rockwell HSS tools from the mid-1960’s on Craigslist, thinking I might use the larger gouge. But what turned out to be a big treat was a spear-point tool. It used to be one of the basic tools in beginners kits, and it is a fun tool to use. Cuts beads and grooves, shear scrapes and other stuff I haven’t learned yet. Really fun. The skews are nicely balanced, perfect bevel and angle, and cut like a dream. The gouges are a big tough, because they’re very shallow and have an aggressive bevel, not quite ready for that yet. Also picked up a pyramid tool from a turner’s estate sale last weekend, it’s a sweetie! Oh, and a square Sorbey scraper, and a few nice pieces of wood.

Stopper still on mandrel, spalted alder. Not perfect, but I like it.

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)



7 comments so far

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17108 posts in 2565 days


#1 posted 08-07-2015 01:55 PM

Nice going, Jamie. You are on your way now. Take a look at a bedan. I use mine all the time for hollowing. It really hogs out the wood, too.. Are the lines wire burned?

I love that Alder. I have a big log of it and have not gotten into it yet to see if there is any spalting. It was gift from a guy in Ana Cortes who was cutting firewood.

cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 545 days


#2 posted 08-07-2015 11:09 PM

Yep, the lines are burned, I thought they would look good with the vertical spalting. Hope the alder log you have is in a somewhat dry area. Alder walks a tightrope between spalted and punky, LOL. LMK if you ever run out, I can send you some. When I get to hollowing (may be awhile), I’ll check out the bedan. Cheers!

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View lew's profile

lew

11331 posts in 3215 days


#3 posted 08-07-2015 11:17 PM

Nice!

Have you seen some of Ruth Niles work? Here’s a link to her site- http://nilesbottlestoppers.com/

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 545 days


#4 posted 08-08-2015 02:50 AM



Nice!

Have you seen some of Ruth Niles work? Here s a link to her site- http://nilesbottlestoppers.com/

- lew


Thanks, Lew, yep I buy my stoppers from Ruth, they are super-high-quality. She wrote me, wanted to know how I heard about her stoppers, and it’d been so long I couldn’t remember. Hope she gets a big percentage of the stopper action out there!

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View lew's profile

lew

11331 posts in 3215 days


#5 posted 08-08-2015 11:31 PM

She lives just a few miles from here. I used to go there to pick up the stoppers. It was always neat to see what she was turning in her shop.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View BobTheJanitor's profile

BobTheJanitor

8 posts in 626 days


#6 posted 08-09-2015 06:23 PM

Turning is a dangerous rabbit hole, for $200 you can get everything you need to start making some really nice stuff out of scrap wood, next thing you know you have spent $1000 on tuning tools looking at droping 1,300 on a new lathe

-- When the going gets tough, the tough get a mop and bucket

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 545 days


#7 posted 08-11-2015 03:04 AM


Turning is a dangerous rabbit hole, for $200 you can get everything you need to start making some really nice stuff out of scrap wood, next thing you know you have spent $1000 on tuning tools looking at droping 1,300 on a new lathe

- BobTheJanitor

Oh, yeah, I learned that 6 years ago when I bought the first 1236 lathe. Fortunately, I had some discretionary $$ then, of which I have little now, so I am so glad I accumulated so many tools already. Buying the lathe is, on a smaller scale, like buying a horse—the initial purchase is nothing compared to the ongoing expenses. At least the lathe won’t cost me $35,000 in medical bills (I hope!). Hmmmm, actually that’s only $1,000 per year of riding and training. Unfortunately, it all came in an 8-month block of time.

Oh, and we’re really lucky to have so much free wood here in the Great Northwest!

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

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