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Handmade Jewellery Box #2: nothing but trouble

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Blog entry by Flemming posted 07-09-2010 09:32 PM 1196 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: part 2 of 1 Part 2 of Handmade Jewellery Box series Part 3: there's light at the end of the tunnel! »

So the past 4 days have brought nothing but trouble… ahem… challenges… I was very close to scrapping the project at one point because I got so fed up one day (one of those days where nothing goes right and everything you do has the complete opposite effect of what you intended..). But I’m over that, and the jewellery box has survived with only a few nicks and dents ;)

actually the biggest hurdle these past few days has been the lid… It’s had 2 modifications. The box is 300mm long by 230mm wide, and the original plan was to have a solid mahogany lid the same dimensions.. and that’s where it all started.. I managed to cut the lid 230mm by 290mm (i often apply the drink once, cut twice rule).. so a new design was in order..

I decided to take the lid down to 210mm by 280mm and put in an oak border 20mm wide on all sides. right, so the plan was set… but plans are made to be changed unfortunately. on this particular day my hand was about as steady as a ship stuck in a storm.. and then I made the big mistake of thinking it would be alright to just glue it together… riiiiiight… it turned out quite lopsided and looked like crap to put it nicely. however, (and very lucky!) the miter joints actually fit quite nicely close to the inner mahogany. SO, another plan was made.

In order to minimize the eye-gouging ugliness of it, I decided to trim down the oak by 15mm, leaving a 5mm boarder and fill in the 15mm with an outer trim of mahogany. Luckily my hand was more steady today and the cuts went perfect, it’s glueing now and now I’m beginning to see the light at the end of the tunnel.

needless to say the lid has produced a lot of unnecessary scrap wood… but so goes sometimes. sorry trees..

pictures to come soon.

on another note… glueing any square shape is incredibly difficult, any suggestions to make it easier?

-- Flemming. It's only a mistake if you can't fix it.



4 comments so far

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

7019 posts in 1962 days


#1 posted 07-09-2010 10:10 PM

well it sounds like you just had a rough time on this one…things that normaly go right went wrong…ive had those days…and sometimes you just have to be willing to say ok…this is firewood…....and start over…ive had a few of those…its all part of the live and learn process…it will all be ok…just laugh it off….and move on…i dont see any pictures here…so im waiting…now ive got to see what gave you so much trouble…lol…grizzman

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View Greg..the Cajun  Box Sculptor's profile

Greg..the Cajun Box Sculptor

5113 posts in 1967 days


#2 posted 07-10-2010 06:48 PM

If you don’t make mistakes you ain’t doing nothing.

-- If retiring is having the time to be able to do what you enjoy then I have always been retired.

View Flemming's profile

Flemming

417 posts in 1555 days


#3 posted 07-10-2010 09:55 PM

glad to know i’m not the only one making mistakes ;)

grizzman – theres a few pictures on the previous blog. tomorrow i’ll make a new one and add some photos so you can see what’s been troubling me.

greg – too true :)

-- Flemming. It's only a mistake if you can't fix it.

View stefang's profile

stefang

13059 posts in 1993 days


#4 posted 07-11-2010 11:51 AM

Your trials seem all to familiar Flemming. On the philosophical side, they say the more mistakes you make the more you learn. If that were entirely true I would now be the Michaelangelo of woodworking. There is lot of truth to it though. Mistakes can also lead to becoming more flexible and even discovering new design ideas underway. Over the years I have had to fix so many errors that I no longer feel panic when something goes wrong on a project, because I know just about anything can be fixed. I’m sure even the masters have to do this, and in fact I’ve learned many of the fixes from top woodworker’s articles. So my advice is to revel in your mistakes and when you are no longer making them, it’s time to move on to some more challenging work.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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