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Maybe the beginning of a larger project #21: On to painting...

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Blog entry by Mark Shymanski posted 248 days ago 655 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 20: Come in to the Gudgeon & Pintle Today... Part 21 of Maybe the beginning of a larger project series Part 22: No brushes, so worked on the mast mount »

It has been a hectic week here. Last weekend I drove over 1500 km round trip to attend my cousin’s 40th wedding anniversary, then my mother came for a visit for a couple of days, Wednesday was family day Thursday was cold raining but I managed to do a bit on hull 816, Friday was mostly taken up with paperwork…a 24 page report on my holidays! Saturday I got back into the shop finished epoxying the tops of the bouyancy tanks and the bottom, the bow and stern. This is where I left off last night:

I have trimmed down my laminated mast blank and cut of the corners to make it more cylindrical. I may taper it as I plane off the corners, its been going pretty quick with my block plane.

The roughed out blank.

A little more cylindrical.

It has been very cool here we are normally into the upper 70s and mid to high 80s but I woke up the other morning and it was 54 in the house….made it real hard to get up out of my nice warm bed:-) As the epoxy has a minimum application temperature of 16°C (60 ish °F) I turned on the shop heat to warm it up a little. I was also concerned that the epoxy metering pumps would not measure correctly if the resin and hardener were too cool.

I mixed the first batch with the new container of thickener I bought early last week (drove by Lee Valley during my 1500 km journey). I’d also purchased more resin and hardener as I didn’t want to run out. It was a nice peanut butter consistancy as I was mixing it but when I got it into the pukemouse is was a little more confined so it started to heat a bit a so was just a tad more runny that I would have liked. To prevent any runs I hoisted up the side
I was working on so the joint was more horizontal. The need for this angle is why the top picture has the boat perched on my scrap crate.

Earlier in the morning I had sealed the bouyancy tanks and once those had hardened, I flipped the boat for access to the bottom. While I was waiting for the tops of the tanks to dry I figured I would work on the mast. So I shuffled the tablesaw over to the door and no sooner than when I got the saw set just right the skies opened up. It poured for over an hour so things were at a bit of a standstill. Once the rain stopped it actually warmed up a fair bit so I was able to open the garage door to be able to have enough room to trim my blank on the TS. I didn’t take pictures but in the last mast shot you can see the General roller stand underneath the mast. I bought two when I bought my saw and they have been enormously helpful. I am able to safely cut sheet goods as I put one roller stand on the infeed side one on the out and the material are supported the whole way through. This is why I actually cut the mast on my table saw as the bandsaw with the roller cart underneath is too high for the rollers to be able to support outgoing stock.

I have been figuring out the bracing for the mast and the step. I’ve decided to make a bit of a box up in the bow to store stuff but mainly be the reinforcing for the mast step.

This a pictute of the setup I used to measure back 12 inches from the joint of the hull and bow. This is an arbitrary distance. I am hopeful that after I have had 816 on the water I will be able to tell if the mast is too far aft or too far forward. This is the one part of the build that has me concerned as I do not want to epoxy the bulkheads and bracing for the mast until I know its in the right spot, so right now I am making bracing blocks and screwing everything in place. My concern is that the moment arm on a full sail will rip the screwed in mast step right out of the hull. But as long as I don’t get clobbered by falling gear I guess I’d just have to paddle the remnant back to shore and start again.

Well I am heading of to a garage sale that boasts lots of tools and even a lathe so painting will have to wait until I am back. I am thinking I will need to lightly sand the epoxy to give the latex paint a bit of a bit.

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2



9 comments so far

View Napaman's profile

Napaman

5275 posts in 2576 days


#1 posted 248 days ago

Looking awesome! FLOATING soon!

-- Matt--Proud LJ since 2007

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

4650 posts in 1297 days


#2 posted 248 days ago

Don’t over think the mast support Mark. The forces generated on this little rig will be fairly minimal and the thing people never take into account is that a lot of that force is dissipated by the boat moving away from the force, ie: heeling or (God forbid) sailing. We tend to think of the force that would be generated if the boat were nailed down to terra firma. I also don’t think that (please excuse me) given the complete lack of hull design in this vessel, the mast position moving an inch or so one way or the other will make one iota of difference. Of course I could be wrong about that but mast position and rake etc are nuances of design and this boat is not about nuance if you know what I mean.
No offence intended.
Get ‘er done, get out sailing and start assembling your thoughts about what improvements you would like to have in your next boat.
Looking great so far.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

4746 posts in 2212 days


#3 posted 248 days ago

Hey Matt, I am hoping to get the mast, sail and rigging sorted out soon, maybe next weekend it’ll get wet.

Paul I bust out laughing with you genteel description of my plywood floating box. ”...the complete lack of hull design…”. It is good to hear that I’m over analyzing the mast. I’ll just go with my plan, put it all together and start on the rigging. I absolutely have been thinking what I’d want in a real boat. These PDRs are butt ugly but they are supposed to be dead stable and easy for kids to learn to sail on and they are dead cheap to build (not a lot of money was spent on design;-). Mind you with what I’ve learned about applying epoxy, with your invaluable assistance, makes some of the more boat like plans a LOT less intimidating! I’m torn between making up a design or purchasing one from somebody who knows what they are doing.

Well I am off to the shop….I may have a wee bit of a tool gloat as a result of my first ever garage sale ‘purchase’.

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

4650 posts in 1297 days


#4 posted 248 days ago

I’ve been building boats for a lifetime and I would not try to design my own. There is a reason that yacht designers spend all that time in school and then apprentice with established design houses. This does not mean that you couldn’t improve on the PDR on your own but why go to the trouble of building a “serious” boat designed by an amateur when ther are so many well designed and proven models out there. Besides if it really sucks, you’d have to blame yourself. It’s much better to have someone else to blame. :-)

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

4746 posts in 2212 days


#5 posted 248 days ago

What was that phrase back in the 80s….”plausible denial ability”. You are right Paul, it would take me many many years of trial and error to get something that would work as well something an apprentice designer would shoot holes in. I want to build good boats not screw up lots of wood. Any variations on the PDR would still be putting lipstick on a pig so I don’t think I should use that as a starting place:-)

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

View Napaman's profile

Napaman

5275 posts in 2576 days


#6 posted 247 days ago

I remember WAAAAAAY back when i was building my Weekender I brought this up in a blog (mast rake/PERFECTION/concerns) and some old guy (not paul!!!) said—-”You could put a sail on a box and it would sail.”

LOL…now we are building pdr’s…so we are really building boxes…rmember—-YOU CAN CHANGE anything since you built it—-i dont think that is true on all designs…but I am finding a lot of flexibility in the sail plans and designs…

-- Matt--Proud LJ since 2007

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

4746 posts in 2212 days


#7 posted 247 days ago

Yeah the PDR is not a particularly finicky boat, I think I’m over complicating much of the build. My next boat would hopefully go more smoothly than this one. I’m learning a lot and hope to get 816 in the water soon.

If It floats and I get an understanding of how sailing feels like I’ll consider it a success.

Have you had a chance to work on yours at all? I guess with the school year starting soon time is at a premium.

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

View Napaman's profile

Napaman

5275 posts in 2576 days


#8 posted 247 days ago

Officially started back at work today. Feels good to be working again after a year off…and back at the school I started with which is a really neat educational environment.

I have not worked on either boat. So many other projects around the house since we moved back last month…and now school starts…but…I will keep trying…

Will be posting some non-boat projects—-because I really have been wood working…just not boat building…

-- Matt--Proud LJ since 2007

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

4746 posts in 2212 days


#9 posted 247 days ago

Good to hear that its your first day back. I can appreciate how good that must feel. Its funny how all the other jobs stack up. I’ve been working on a bathroom rennovation building maple cabinets for the vanity and am not real happy with the results. I really…really messed up the drawers and drawers faces…or should I say I had a lot of redesign opportunities on the drawers and fronts:-) Enjoy the new year! As long as we’re making sawdust its a good thing it doesn’t really matter which project we’re working on.

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

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