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Maybe the beginning of a larger project #17: A blizzard of fuzzy white seeds!

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Blog entry by Mark Shymanski posted 08-02-2013 07:56 PM 935 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 16: Don't run with scissors! Part 17 of Maybe the beginning of a larger project series Part 18: Bouyancy tanks are closed in. »

So I am having a pretty lazy morning and while I got up early thus morning I kinda just puttered the morning away (looking at potential boat plans can consume a lot of time:-) . I finally got out to the shop, the coffee pot was empty anyway, and decided to fillet the lower starboard joint and then while hull 816 was on its side I coated the interior of both bouyancy tanks and anything else that was horizontal in this orientation. On Paul’s (shipwright) suggestion I wetted out the fabric on the flat and then pouring epoxy on top as he explains in his tips on epoxy blog. Not only is this method way way tidier it is also faster which surprised me. I was immersing my tape in a too small container, which was great for mixing but awkward for soaking. Laying it flat on a piece of poly was tidy, quick and used far less epoxy.

While I was puttering I was reading a bit about where I should put the mast step. PDR Shorty recommends 12 inches back from the bow, but he has a hull that is 16 to my 18 inches deep. I think I will mount the step 12 inches back from the joint of the bow and the hull. I hope this isn’t too close to the rudder that I lose some effectiveness of the rudder. I have a good handle on how I’m making my gudgeons (thanks Paul) but I haven’t settled on a style of rudder yet. I keep wanting to over design then I stop myself and remind myself that the more complicated I make it the less sailing time I’m going to have.

Oh yeah I was talking about finishing up coating the bouyancy tanks, all morning it had been pretty calm which is unusual for Brandon and I’m just about done coating the starboard outside inside the starboard tank, the in board side of the port tank and the interior of the port tank which as you can see in the above photo is right at ground level. Now keep in mind that all the surfaces are pretty tacky with epoxy, I have my head and entire attention focussed deep in the port tank when I feel a breeze start…oh nice I thought this will blow some of the fumes out. The fumes indeed were lessening but after I finish and start to sit up I realize the breeze is carrying a virtual blizzard of fine white puffy seeds! All across my very tacky glue! I am so glad this is not a refined boat where I’d spent a lot of effort to make it look good as I now something that looks like a cross between a polar bear and a packing crate :-) !

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2



5 comments so far

View Napaman's profile

Napaman

5365 posts in 2823 days


#1 posted 08-02-2013 08:23 PM

Mark (and Paul, lol):

Are you only putting tape on the corners or will you also put a sheet of fiber glass on the bottom as well?

I did not think of taping the corners on the inside of the boat…I figured with epoxy filet in the corners and clear epoxy spread in the bottom and inside air boxes I would be okay…what do you think?

Progress looks good…and your lazy??? LOL!

-- Matt--Proud LJ since 2007

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5119 posts in 2458 days


#2 posted 08-02-2013 09:51 PM

I’m not sure Matt. What I was going to do to test the water tightness was to pour some water into the bouyancy tanks and see if any escaped. I won’y be able to tell for certain for the top joints are okay but I figure if the first joints I made are tight than these last ones should be alright. Strength wise you are probably okay but I think I’d still fillet and tape them.

I’d thought about fibre glassing the whole bottom, and that would probably ensure a long lifespan for hull 816, but then I traded off durability for cost. I don’t intend this to be my last boat…I still want to build a real dinghy like the Whitehall. PDR Shorty even used a bed sheet in one of his boats as re-inforcing cloth…it probably would have been cheaper in epoxy to use glass cloth than the a super absorbant bed sheet. Mind you the more fun I have building this scow the more I think I’d like to build something even bigger than the Whitehall. ...far too much time on the Glen-L and CLC websites…LOL!

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

5298 posts in 1543 days


#3 posted 08-03-2013 12:10 AM

A bed sheet? Does this guy have any credentials at all to be dispensing advice?
I don’t think you should be putting a lot of weight on his advice.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View Napaman's profile

Napaman

5365 posts in 2823 days


#4 posted 08-03-2013 01:34 AM

LOL…Paul you should spend some time on the PDR site…you would either laugh or boil over…

I like it because it gets guys to try new things and puts people on the water quick and cheap (not counting me lol)...

-- Matt--Proud LJ since 2007

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5119 posts in 2458 days


#5 posted 08-03-2013 02:47 AM

He does have a unique perspective on things. I just hope his design actually floats!

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

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