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Maybe the beginning of a larger project #5: Port side chine logs installed!

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Blog entry by Mark Shymanski posted 07-15-2013 01:07 AM 789 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Bulkheads cut and mast material bought Part 5 of Maybe the beginning of a larger project series Part 6: Progress - pictures pending. »

Saturday was a pretty productive day. I spent the morning trying to locate a local source of two part epoxy. Other than those little syringes of glue the sell in blister packs I was SOL. Canadian tire had epoxies but the didn’t have the thin wetting fabric kind, theirs already had the thixotropic ingredients in already. The only fabric they sold came in big squares not rolls so it would have meant a lot of working with short pieces and a lot more cutting of the fabric. I did find a large can of epoxy at Princess Auto but it wasn’t a brand I recognized and I wasn’t really comfortable with the sparse directions…perhaps if I knew what I was doing but…

In order to get as much done as possible I decided to proceed with the chine log construction as the closest epoxy and fabric source is a 5 hour drive away….it kinda kicks the stuffing out of the boat budget if I spend on gas almost what it’d cost me for the epoxy. I had cut chine logs a while ago from a 2×10 I had stored from another project. In my reading of the PDR website they recommend 7/8” chine logs so I trimmed down what I had. In retrospect I probably could have still bent what I’d originally cut.

Those thinner strips are the chine logs. You may notice some of them have a pronounced curve. The beauty of using kiln dried construction grade lumber :-) But there is an upside to this unintentional bending…I used the natural curve to complement the more severe curve I was imposing thus actually reducing the net stress on those select ‘bent’ elements.

In using the curved pieces I positioned them on the boat to best advantage which left a bunch of material extending beyond the plywood side. When I trimmed the pieces with my trusty handsaw I realized that they were cut to the exact angle I needed to properly fit the cutoffs into the vertical fore and aft chine logs! It was almost like I’d planned it that way LOL!

I cut the front one spot on and was feeling quite pleased with myself…until I attempted the back one :-( I got cocky and eyeballed it as I had done the front one, well lets just say after the 3rd piece I finally got it…I don’t know how I screwed up the measurement! Eyeballing sure that is easy for me to botch but how difficult is it to cut a trapezoid 32.7 cm long… it was at this point I thought I’d take a break:-)

Earlier I had ripped the 2×6 I’d bought for the mast. Keep in mind this is Home Depot construction grade pine so clear wood is not even a concept there. You get what you pay for:-) Last time I was wondering if I should rip and let it sit or rip and glue. I decided to glue immediately after ripping, we’ll see if this was a good idea. This mast may just turn out to be another prototype and I may spring for the Sitka spruce Paul recommended.

This is why we have the adage that you can never have too many clamps LOL! I used up all my clamps and would have liked a few more. I was going to trim the taper on 1) the bandsaw 2) the tablesaw or 3) on the jointer but decided to use handplanes as a more controlled way of shaping the mast. There is just something about hand planing I am enjoying more and more. I think this stems partially from having good tools and not fighting with my inheritted No.4s. Or maybe I am just learning how to effectively use a plane. I do like the heft and solidity of my Lee Valley planes!


Following Paul (shipwright’s) advice I’m going to plane the corners successively until I have something resembling a tapered column.

I was asked to post the plans I am using. I am using the plans and tips and instructions from the PDRacer.com website. If you Google Puddle Duck Racers or PDR racers you’ll find a bunch of links. Most importantly there are some pretty good resources here on LJs. I mentioned Paul aka shipwright a couple of times…if you are thinking of building a boat check out Paul’s blogs. Napaman or Matt is a fellow LJ who is also racing to build a PDR and I’ve got to hustle to pass him otherwise I’m gonna find out how the PDR handles the ice of the Northwest Passage LOL!

Actual working time this weekend is about 7 hours and I spent another $15 on plywood and I think about $15 for the 2×6! So I am in the $80 range so far. Mind you I am using ‘stock’ inventory for the chine logs and I intend to use up all the remnant cans of paint on this boat so there won’t be a lot of cost there. If you see a funny loking sailboat with pink flotation tanks its a good chance its my first boat:-) I am planning to itemize all the costs as I incur them so by the end I should have a fair idea of what a second would cost. I know already it would go much faster and efficiently. I’m learning every time I work on this boat!

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2



7 comments so far

View Boatman53's profile

Boatman53

839 posts in 883 days


#1 posted 07-15-2013 02:57 AM

I’m surprised you can’t find epoxy closer to you. Look into Jamestown Distrbuters they will ship it to your door. Good luck with the build.
Jim

-- Jim, Long Island, NY Ancorayachtservice.com home of the chain leg vise

View stefang's profile

stefang

13270 posts in 2021 days


#2 posted 07-15-2013 04:34 PM

Sounds like you are having fun Mark. As for shaping the mast, wouldn’t it be easier and faster to rough it out with the bandsaw set at appropriate angles and then finish with the hand plane?

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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Boatman53

839 posts in 883 days


#3 posted 07-15-2013 06:01 PM

Hey Mark, do a search for “spar gauge” for a handy tool to help you get a square tapered blank to a round tapered mast. They are easy to make and will save a lot of time.
Jim

-- Jim, Long Island, NY Ancorayachtservice.com home of the chain leg vise

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5113 posts in 2399 days


#4 posted 07-16-2013 04:21 AM

Hey Jim, thanks for the tips about Jamestown Distributors and the spar gauge. I actually want to find a vendor that I talk with and bounce some questions off, but if I can’t find that local I may have to go the ordering route. I have asked one of our local paint and hobby stores what they can find.

Hello Mike, I’d thought about using one of the power tools to shape the mast but I’m finding shaping it this way to be a pretty good stress relief. Unlike my ‘paying the bills job’ which has little tangible results, here I have a pile of shavings at my feet to show that I’ve actually done something tangible.

The biggest stumbling block I am having with the spar gauge is how does it mark out a taper? My internet connection is a bit dodgy so watching videos is painfully slow and herky-jerky. A new network should be up and running soon though! I’m afraid that I didn’t quite get how the whole thing was set up using Pythagoras’ theorum. I will need to spend a bit more time with it before I’ll get it sorted in my head. It looks like a really good solution to marking out the spars. I am thinking I will need to make actual spars so this is certainly worth figuring out.

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

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Boatman53

839 posts in 883 days


#5 posted 07-16-2013 12:25 PM

Sorry if I confused you. The spar gauge doesn’t mark the initial taper. When the mast is straight and square all around you mark on the end (top) what the plans say it should be. Then mark on the body of the spar the end of the full round/ beginning of the taper. Connect those two points Then with a band saw or plane remove the wood outside those lines. Now the spar gauge comes into play. It lays out the lines to plane the corners down, and because of the way it is used the lines are all in proportion even along the taper. Hope that cleared it up some, if not just ask away shipwright or I should be able to answer your questions.
Jim

-- Jim, Long Island, NY Ancorayachtservice.com home of the chain leg vise

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5113 posts in 2399 days


#6 posted 07-17-2013 02:06 AM

That makes sense, if I’d thought a little more about that it probably would have occurred to me. I will be wanting to make oars and,I can’t think of the terminology, the horizontal spar that holds the sail away from the mast. My apologies to all the sailors out there who are now cringing at the prairie boy’s description of common sailing gear LOL!

I’m going to check out sitka spruce for the mast because the collection of knots I am currently working on may nit work so well. What would be good for oars. I’m thinking douglas fir because of its strength and light weight?

Mark

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

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Boatman53

839 posts in 883 days


#7 posted 07-17-2013 04:21 AM

I’m working on some oars now (but not in a rush to finish them ‘cause the boat got all beat up in a storm, that’s now on my next winter schedule). They are Sitka spruce. I have a guide boat that has Ash oars and I used Maple oars on another guide boat that I built. The last two have very thin looms with a lot of flex, they are very nice to row with.
Jim

-- Jim, Long Island, NY Ancorayachtservice.com home of the chain leg vise

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