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Bowl Making! - Showing off some of our new toys in action!! #11: Roebling #4 - Douglas Fir Beam to Bowl Video

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Blog entry by Eric M. Saperstein posted 06-17-2014 04:55 PM 1707 reads 1 time favorited 22 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 10: Pending arrival ... a 100 year old manzanita trunk! Part 11 of Bowl Making! - Showing off some of our new toys in action!! series Part 12: A 70.5lb Manzanita Burl »

This is the first of a series of promo/educational videos just for fun to show the creation of some of our turning projects, it will eventually span into other projects and venues if this campaign is successful.

This is a historic beam, lots of history to it, 100+ year old Douglas Fir heartwood.

OK Let’s have some fun with some opening thoughts …

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10152146036613148&set=vb.187687888147&type=3&theater

Added Remix Short Version 8/5/2014

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10152236984668148

Artisans of the Valley presents – Roebling Bowl #4 – 2014, an educational video showing the creative process from beam to bowl. Just nine minutes in time lapse format showing each stage of the simple layout, cutting the blank, the turning process, sanding, finishing, polishing, and hand burning in a signature.

#1 – Round is boring! After a while, ya know what it’s OK to leave some flat sides so if you love it or hate it that’s fine its artwork and it’s my art!

#2 – I don’t like face shields, its my face and I’ll get splinters in it if I want too. YES I have glasses on I’m not stupid I like my eyes, I need them to see with. Face shields fog up and when they do it’s more dangerous than without them as you can’t see what you are doing. I’ll eventually get an air shield.

#3 – I like my spindle rouging gouge … its a traditional sharpening style, its slightly swept back so the edges are NOT going to snag so easily. It’s 3/8” soft tool steel, its not snapping any time soon. It works … I like it … yes I am fully aware it is not an expensive specialized bowl gouge. It sharpens quickly and easily … important when cutting contaminated abrasive materials. If you don’t like them for this purpose, don’t use one!

#4 – I like scrapers … they work, maybe one day I’ll start playing with more bowl gouges but with this material and with manzanita I find that it just works much easier to simply scrape. The tools dull so often in this stuff with all kinds of abrasives and contaminates that its much faster for me to just quickly sharpen a scraper than it is to go mess with angles and perfect sweeps on a bowl gouge.

#5 – Power sander on lathe, this is a business! I am not spending hours and hours upon hours sanding. It works, and yes once and a while you can get it snagged up. It’s $69 and to smash one and completely destroy it would still be a savings even if it happened every 20 bowls compared to the time spent sanding without one. It doesn’t really happen though, run 50-100 rpm and be ready to let it go and get your hand out of the way if it does catch. I’ve done this for years, it works …

#6 – Faceplates vs Chucking reminder this is a BUSINESS … chucking takes time and effort. A faceplate takes a few minutes to mount and you’re spinning. Why loose 3/4” depth of the bowl in the center with an inset chuck mortise? Put the screw out wide on a face plate and use lots of small screws and you’re in business fast and you get the center depth. Fast … efficient …

#7 – Reminder, historic value … these will sell around NJ / NY for this reason. Douglas fir isn’t the most interesting material in the universe but this stuff happens to be very rare/unique. It’s also probably gonna kill me to turn it as who knows what’s in it so it is thus sealed with epoxy to ensure nothing leaches out of it. Some of that “black spot” may be the very oil that was used to lubricate the cables of the Brooklyn Bridge.

#8 – The Sorby sharpener is prob one of the best things we picked up to add to our sharpening lineup, and putting it right next to the lathe was the smartest shop layout decision we have made in years. Its fast, easy, and requires only a sidestep to the right and back to the work on the lathe.

#9 – The PowerMatic 3520B is a great machine … loving it! Yes would recommend, yes buy one! It has handled everything I have thrown at it so far w/o a single shake or vibration. There is a 70lb manzanita burl coming soon that will be my next test!!

-- Eric M. Saperstein, Master Craftsman www.artisansofthevalley.com



22 comments so far

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

5110 posts in 1533 days


#1 posted 06-17-2014 06:30 PM

Eric,

Looks like you are enjoying turning. Nice blog!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Roger's profile

Roger

14859 posts in 1495 days


#2 posted 06-17-2014 10:28 PM

Fantastic Eric.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Kentuk55@bellsouth.net

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

1853 posts in 881 days


#3 posted 06-18-2014 12:17 AM

Very interesting, hearing your point if view on things, the reasoning behind your methods of work. I was wondering about the flats on the sides, watched the video first, but your write up explained all quite well. Nice blog.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Eric M. Saperstein's profile

Eric M. Saperstein

765 posts in 1938 days


#4 posted 06-18-2014 02:20 AM

Thanks!

Also that black spot is history – that very oil may be the lubricant used to make the cables on the Brooklyn Bridge or some other famous span. At least some of it has to be preserved!

-- Eric M. Saperstein, Master Craftsman www.artisansofthevalley.com

View Underdog's profile

Underdog

547 posts in 726 days


#5 posted 06-18-2014 11:36 AM

I would only take issue with your point #2. Splinters aren’t the concern. A bowl blowing up at speed will not just give you splinters. It will crush all the bones in your face….

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3500 posts in 2651 days


#6 posted 06-18-2014 07:04 PM

I use a bunch of reclaimed for projects (round and flat).
The final result is very well done. I was wonderin’ where you were goin’ with the flats left.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Eric M. Saperstein's profile

Eric M. Saperstein

765 posts in 1938 days


#7 posted 06-19-2014 03:22 AM

At some point I’ll get one of those air circulation systems with a shield – I just can’t deal with the fogging. Every one I have tried just starts to haze up and then I can’t see straight or they get scratched and messed up around the shop and the scratches annoy me. Glasses are cheap enough to keep replacing!

-- Eric M. Saperstein, Master Craftsman www.artisansofthevalley.com

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

5110 posts in 1533 days


#8 posted 06-19-2014 03:39 AM

Eric,

An alternative is the kind of face sheild used for saw ing timber. Screen mesh. Might solve your problem for less?

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Eric M. Saperstein's profile

Eric M. Saperstein

765 posts in 1938 days


#9 posted 06-19-2014 03:57 AM

Ya know … I didn’t think of that!!!!! I have one of those w/ the headphones and the hard hat and such. I think it’s in my truck I keep it there so I don’t forget it when I grab the chainsaw. I could use that I guess. Wonder if they make those without the whole hardhat and ears setup I don’t usually need the ear protection.

-- Eric M. Saperstein, Master Craftsman www.artisansofthevalley.com

View Eric M. Saperstein's profile

Eric M. Saperstein

765 posts in 1938 days


#10 posted 06-19-2014 04:01 AM

Yeah something like this … could try one see how it feels. This type of stuff annoys me like crazy when it’s hanging on me or in the view.

http://www.amleo.com/product.aspx?p=1324MS&kc=AMLSHOP14&crcat=pla+tools-hoes-cultivators-weeders~Head+Protection&crsource=adwords&crkw=Wire+Mesh+Face+Shield&gclid=CNPuupaGhb8CFbNQOgodk0QAWA

-- Eric M. Saperstein, Master Craftsman www.artisansofthevalley.com

View Underdog's profile

Underdog

547 posts in 726 days


#11 posted 06-19-2014 02:33 PM

Make sure to try the thing on before you buy. I have tried the Trend Air Shield Pro, and for me there’s just not enough adjustment to make it comfortable. It’s a flat shield which allows for good visibility (and using peel off protectors) and it has good filtration and air flow.. but it’s uncomfortable and heavy and I wind up leaving it in the box…
I’ve also tried the Triton PAPR, and while it was comfortable it had a bubble shield which distorts the view. It also had less air flow and fogged up regularly in cold weather and was HOT in warm weather. I liked that it had ear muffs and a hard hat, but it did not do the job for me.

I would like to try the 3M PAPR but it’s really pricey…

I wind up using the Uvex Bionix face shield most of the time, because it’s very comfortable and adjustable. I also can use the peel off visor protector….

Unfortunately even these don’t do enough to protect you from a bowl blast.

The gal that wrote an article in the last AAW journal had her face bones crushed, and had months of reconstructive surgery and therapy, finally wound up using a crash helmet when she got back in the shop…. So sometimes I wonder if even the expensive PAPR units are enough protection.

I think sometimes I should just stick to turning pens or small objects…

View Eric M. Saperstein's profile

Eric M. Saperstein

765 posts in 1938 days


#12 posted 06-19-2014 03:47 PM

That’s part of what I’m afraid of with making the investment, I don’t like even having a watch on, or anything in my pockets. I don’t really like much at all touching me so to speak. It’s annoying kinda princess/pea type of thing if I get a small piece of dust in my boot or sock! So hanging an apparatus off my head/face just provides for a distraction/annoyance. Obviously I put up with glasses and ear protection as its an immediate problem with flying dust and the noise bothers me more than the headphones sometimes.

I try to actually maintain a little bit lower speed on some of this stuff even if it’s to my detriment in turning performance. Especially the manzanita … I have a 70.5lb chunk of that crazy stuff in transit from CA now. I think I will use the advice above and use my chainsaw mask while spinning that. It’s likely to be a bit of a crazy situation from time to time with it. I plan to shoot some video as the process goes on. I’m sure that’ll freak out a few people!

The reality is we’re mounting large unstable blocks of heavy wood on a machine, spinning it at a ridiculous RPM, standing in close proximity, and then we proceed to stab at it with sharpened metal spikes. We’re nuts … this is utterly insane … but its fun, its challenging, and we love the results.

You can zone out and force yourself to concentrate for hours as if you do not focus you get hurt – you HAVE to focus. It’s the only thing lately that can pull me out of the rest of the stress of life. It may be just for short periods, but I need a break and even sleep doesn’t give me a break as I rarely get any length of sleep and I end up having frustration dreams half the time anyway!

There’s an inherent risk in anything/everything. Almost fell out of a tree a couple years ago when a tree stand collapsed on me. Flipped 4wheelers, had vehicle accidents, had machines fail, done stupid things with equipment and was lucky not to be hurt. We try to eliminate/reduce risk but we’d have to live in rubber rooms and then we’d probably die of something from the off-gassing of the rubber.

I’m actually surprised until DocSavage mentioned it that I really never did think of using the wire mesh. I kept looking at plastic/lexan, etc. The mesh is the best compromise. It will offer protection, not perfect, and I’d still need glasses behind it for dust and that’s fine. It’s light, it breaths … I will be trying my chainsaw mask next time then prob ordering a lighter one without ears if it works for me.

-- Eric M. Saperstein, Master Craftsman www.artisansofthevalley.com

View Eric M. Saperstein's profile

Eric M. Saperstein

765 posts in 1938 days


#13 posted 06-19-2014 03:50 PM

I also need to pick out a bowl gouge … wonder how this new powdered steel will hold up to the abrasive environments of manzanita and such?

I have two blades in S230V – my custom chef’s knife which is insanely sharp and holds it and a folding hunting knife I sharpen once a year before deer season starts and it does every deer all season without an issue.

-- Eric M. Saperstein, Master Craftsman www.artisansofthevalley.com

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

5110 posts in 1533 days


#14 posted 06-19-2014 04:16 PM

Eric,

Guess I didn’t fix my post befor shutting down last night. It was a comment on being safe. I’m going to attempt some milling on some free logs at our local compost site. Commercial tree removal companies drop off stuff a lot. It’s something I want to try, but I’m gettting whoosie in my older years. Going to try anyway.

Got a steel chainsaw mill ( heavier0 and it turns out my saw may be underpowered. Don’t want to spend big bucks for my fantasy. did get kevlar gloves and chaps. Trying to find steel toe boots to fit my feet. Plus it’s gonna be hot and humid. Haven’t purchased the vest. When I was young I wouldn’t have thought so much about safety. Being older I think about the negative consequences of my impulsivity.

Going to meet the challenge though and find out how much of a freekin fantasy it is. LOL!

I also have a lath thats waiting for me. A grinder, and some not real expensive HHS tools waiting to be sharpened.

Be Safe, have fun.

I also have a walkie talkie for connecting to my wife when working on my own.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Eric M. Saperstein's profile

Eric M. Saperstein

765 posts in 1938 days


#15 posted 06-19-2014 04:34 PM

Yeah I wouldn’t want to run that mill alone! Never know with those contraptions what can go wrong.

I’d def get a vest and the protective legs. I have both for chainsaw work – obviously not required in the video for a small electric but I use it when I fire up the big 71cc Johnsred. That thing ever catches and kicks and I’m in trouble FAST … no games with that.

We still have tons of logs around, but nobody wants to mill them after the storm the market fell out of lumber! Go figure … just when I get myself a pile of logs.

-- Eric M. Saperstein, Master Craftsman www.artisansofthevalley.com

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